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AcK AcK

Discussions on the equipment used by the Axis forces, apart from the things covered in the other sections.
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AcK AcK

Postby BuddaBell123 on 07 Jul 2013 19:54

Can't find a recent enough thread to ask this question on. Does anyone know why German anti-aircraft guns such as the Flak 1936 was nicknamed the AcK AcK?
Last edited by BuddaBell123 on 08 Jul 2013 09:02, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: AK AK

Postby Christian Ankerstjerne on 07 Jul 2013 21:10

It was a reference to the sound of it being fired. I've usually seen it spelled ack ack.
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Re: AcK AcK

Postby BuddaBell123 on 08 Jul 2013 09:04

Was the name Ack Ack only refering to the Flak 1936 alone? Or did it refer to all German anti-aircraft and anti-tank guns?
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Re: AcK AcK

Postby Christian Ankerstjerne on 10 Jul 2013 00:04

It was a generic term for any anti-aircraft tank. The 8,8 cm Flak 36 wasn't special in that regard.
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Re: AcK AcK

Postby amcl on 10 Jul 2013 01:24

It originated in WW1, long before the Flak 36 was thought of, and meant any sort of AA.

And why ack ack? Because the British Army phonetic alphabet of the time went "A for Ack, B for Beer, ..., Y for Yorker, Z for Zebra". This sounds rather like the RAF alphabet of WW2 but wasn't quite the seem: differences included M for Emma (so Pip Emma = After noon) rather than Monkey/Mother and G for Gee rather than George.

Somewhat more tedious detail to be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAF_phonetic_alphabet

P.S. The Navy did things differently. Their A was for Apple. But they were both wrong. As any fule kno, A is for Horses.
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Re: AcK AcK

Postby nordfriese on 10 Jul 2013 09:02

Hi,

...or maybe it is wrong pronounced...

German soldiers called the 8.8 cm Flak just "Acht-Acht" (Eight-Eight),
which is quite close to your "Ack Ack"

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Re: AcK AcK

Postby StefanSiverud on 11 Jul 2013 00:15

As amcl pointed out, the origin is the phonetic alphabet word for A as used by several armies in the WW1 and to some extent during the inter-war era. That it sounds a bit like you'd expect a smaller AA gun would probably helped the word survive (Able Able and Apple Apple doesn't have the same ring to it), but is in no way the origin of the word Ack Ack.

As for the term AA or Ack Ack, it's an acronym of Anti-Aircraft (usually referring to guns, although there are other kinds of AA), but has nothing to do with anti-tank guns (unless, of course, it's an AA gun that happens to used against tanks).
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