Axis History Forum

This is an apolitical forum for discussions on the Axis nations and related topics hosted by Marcus Wendel's Axis History Factbook in cooperation with Michael Miller's Axis Biographical Research, Christoph Awender's WW2 day by dayand Christian Ankerstjerne’s Panzerworld.

Skip to content

If you found the forum useful please consider supporting us. You can also support us by buying books through the AHF Bookstore.

Acts of Chivalry and Honour

Discussions on WW2 covering more than one theatre of the war.

Acts of Chivalry and Honour

Postby hauptmannn on 19 Mar 2004 17:43

Are there any accounts of honourable or gentlemanly acts during ww2 between the two sides? I am aware that there were some in North Africa but i cannot get a hold of any accounts :( If anyone has anything to share, please do :)
User avatar
hauptmannn
Member
France
 
Posts: 1001
Joined: 12 Jul 2003 14:15
Location: France

Postby cuski on 19 Mar 2004 20:49

To me, the most memorable account is that of Herr Oberleutnant Franz Stigler.

Story.
User avatar
cuski
Member
Canada
 
Posts: 69
Joined: 21 Aug 2003 23:44
Location: Vancouver, Canada

Postby Gyenes on 19 Mar 2004 21:48

That is a very nice story cuski. Thanks for sharing it.
User avatar
Gyenes
Member
United States
 
Posts: 208
Joined: 11 Nov 2003 05:11
Location: United States of America

Postby alf on 19 Mar 2004 23:49

I'll post an act of Japanese chivalry here because of the heading

During the Battle of Milne Bay in August/September 1942 where the Japanese suffered their first defeat of the war, the Australian Hospital Ship Manunda, was able to load Australian wounded and sick and sail out of the bay and through the Japanese Naval task force unhindered.

The Japanese Cruiser Tenryu lit the Manunda up with her searchlights but the Manunda was allowed to sail to safety.

Image

That action by the Japanese Navy showed chivalry.
alf
Member
Australia
 
Posts: 1211
Joined: 09 Oct 2003 10:45
Location: Australia

Postby hauptmannn on 20 Mar 2004 03:28

Yes those were indeed very good stories reminding us of some good acts in the war.
User avatar
hauptmannn
Member
France
 
Posts: 1001
Joined: 12 Jul 2003 14:15
Location: France

Postby Jeremy Chan on 20 Mar 2004 05:52

There was the battle in the Hurtgen Forest in 1945, where the US and German combatants stopped fighting to evacuate their wounded.
User avatar
Jeremy Chan
Member
Australia
 
Posts: 1235
Joined: 25 Aug 2003 10:32
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Postby Wiking Ruf on 20 Mar 2004 06:18

Colonel SteelFist wrote:There was the battle in the Hurtgen Forest in 1945, where the US and German combatants stopped fighting to evacuate their wounded.


Same in Arnhem, September 1944. Allied forces (english) requested a chease-fire for a couple of hours. The germans accepted so both could take care for their wounded and dead.

Both english para's and german Waffen-SS troops fought ferociously, but gained respect for each other.
User avatar
Wiking Ruf
Member
Netherlands
 
Posts: 233
Joined: 23 May 2003 20:17
Location: The Netherlands

Postby Conacher1941 on 21 Mar 2004 22:51

In the book Das Reich Lucas tells a story of an SS squad bumping into an American squad one night during Wacht Am Rhein. Not being able to tell who they ran into, the German asked "Are you American?" to which the American replied "Yeah". "You want to fight?" asked the German. "No..." came the reply, and they both went their separate ways.


...Conacher
User avatar
Conacher1941
Member
United States
 
Posts: 729
Joined: 17 Sep 2003 22:56
Location: Toronto, Canada

Postby Beppo Schmidt on 22 Mar 2004 00:22

Field Marshal Erwin Rommel gave Allied POWs the same rations and medical treatment as himself and his men. Rommel also refused Hitler's orders to execute British Commandos and Jewish soldiers.
User avatar
Beppo Schmidt
Member
United States
 
Posts: 3377
Joined: 14 May 2003 02:05
Location: Ohio, USA

Postby Piet Duits on 22 Mar 2004 01:31

Another Rommel-act of chivalry, or stubborness?: he refused to shoot the french foreign legionairs defending a fort in the desert of Libia, although these Legionairs were germans.
User avatar
Piet Duits
Member
Netherlands
 
Posts: 429
Joined: 18 Apr 2002 21:07
Location: Oudenbosch, Netherlands

Postby cyberdaemon on 22 Mar 2004 12:42

Colonel SteelFist wrote:There was the battle in the Hurtgen Forest in 1945, where the US and German combatants stopped fighting to evacuate their wounded.


in the movie "stalingrad" there was a same thing - both side sieged fire to evacuate theyr wounded
one german even exchanged hes piece of bread against russians piece of meat.
User avatar
cyberdaemon
Member
Estonia
 
Posts: 414
Joined: 11 Mar 2004 22:04
Location: estonia

Postby Jon G. on 26 Mar 2004 08:05

Double post, sorry.
Last edited by Jon G. on 26 Mar 2004 08:06, edited 1 time in total.
Jon G.
Former member
Denmark
 
Posts: 6452
Joined: 17 Feb 2004 01:12
Location: Europe

Postby Jon G. on 26 Mar 2004 08:05

The Italians had a reputation for treating their POWs well. After the Taranto strike in November 1940, three RN airmen who had participated in the strike were captured alive after their two planes had been shot down. The Italians treated them with impeccable courtesy, even though they had just badly shot up the Italian fleet.

At least the early parts of the war in North Africa was fought with precious little hate between the Italian and Commonwealth units - maybe because O'Connor had fought with the Italians in WWI, and he had an Italian medal to show for it.

When marshal Balbo, Italian governor of Libya, died in a plane crash in 1940, a British plane flew over the lines and dropped a letter of condolence.

One of the Italian frogmen who participated in the December 1941 attack on Alexandria, which sank the warships Valiant and Queen Elizabeth was decorated for this deed in 1943 (after Italy had changed sides) by the British captain of the Valiant!
Jon G.
Former member
Denmark
 
Posts: 6452
Joined: 17 Feb 2004 01:12
Location: Europe

Postby Piet Duits on 26 Mar 2004 09:01

Shrek wrote:One of the Italian frogmen who participated in the December 1941 attack on Alexandria, which sank the warships Valiant and Queen Elizabeth was decorated for this deed in 1943 (after Italy had changed sides) by the British captain of the Valiant!


Well, this is sick. To decorate somebody who sank your own ship is not right.
How many crewmembers were killed in the sinking? What did they get?
Maybe I am missing the point, but in my opinion it is a disgrace of the decoration.
User avatar
Piet Duits
Member
Netherlands
 
Posts: 429
Joined: 18 Apr 2002 21:07
Location: Oudenbosch, Netherlands

Postby Jon G. on 26 Mar 2004 09:10

Piet Duits wrote:Well, this is sick. To decorate somebody who sank your own ship is not right.
How many crewmembers were killed in the sinking? What did they get?
Maybe I am missing the point, but in my opinion it is a disgrace of the decoration.


Actually, some of the Italian frogmen were captured after attaching underwater charges to the British ships, but before the charges went off. They were interned aboard one of the ships they had mined but didn't say anything and went down with the ship.
Jon G.
Former member
Denmark
 
Posts: 6452
Joined: 17 Feb 2004 01:12
Location: Europe

Next

Return to WW2 in general

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot] and 1 guest