Wooden propeller in Fw 190 D and others

Discussions on all (non-biographical) aspects of the Luftwaffe air units and general discussions on the Luftwaffe.
Romani
Member
Posts: 83
Joined: 14 Nov 2007 22:08
Location: Crimea

Wooden propeller in Fw 190 D and others

Postby Romani » 29 Dec 2007 19:51

I have found recently that the Dora had a wooden propeller, was this a materials saving measure as the wooden tails of Bf109s? Was a compromise solution because there was no time to make tools to machine propellers of that wide paddle shape? Or it was a deliberate design choice to save weight?

I only ask because i saw a recovered wreck of a bomber at a British museum, I think it was a Lancaster and was recovered from a fjord in Norway and seemed like it had wooden propellers, splintered and broken like in that photo, I thought it was a creative license to display the airplane, but now i am in doubt at wether that bomber had wooden props to increase range and ceiling by saving weight.

JodelFlieger
Member
Posts: 144
Joined: 07 Aug 2007 18:17
Location: Ireland

Postby JodelFlieger » 30 Dec 2007 04:16

hi there
Often wooden props were/are used to get the Centre of Gravity within limits, ie, if a metal prop would bring the C of G out of limits.Sometimes, it was simply a matter of availability of production capacity and a desire to save alloys for more vital production.
regards
JF

User avatar
Erich
Member
Posts: 2519
Joined: 12 Mar 2002 23:28
Location: OR

Postby Erich » 01 Jan 2008 18:48

wooden props were used on the Fw 190A-8 and A-9 at the pilots request enabling the a/c to have more power than metal

User avatar
phylo_roadking
Member
Posts: 17478
Joined: 30 Apr 2006 23:31
Location: Belfast

Postby phylo_roadking » 01 Jan 2008 20:49

Laminated wooden propellors were, in certain shapes, curves and pitches - intrinsically stronger than shaped tubular metal, allowing higher revolutions and airspeeds...very much like carbon fibre blades recently. The downside is they take longer to produce - correct woods need to be selected, seasoned, laminated, formed by soaking and tensioning and finally shaped.

User avatar
Mark in Cleveland, Tn.
Member
Posts: 3515
Joined: 27 Jul 2004 01:30
Location: Cleveland ,tennessee

Postby Mark in Cleveland, Tn. » 01 Jan 2008 23:13

I know through my helping restore a mid 1930's me 108
that wooden props were used. The one i helped restore for the CAF had a black varnished wooden prop, and also had a metal one in a replacement crate.
The me 108 was a very simple aircraft. I was amazed at the ease of construction.. solid, but very simple.
The hardest part of the restoration was the refabrication of the windscreen(canopy) front.. Maybe I will post a thread on what we went through, and the simple but time consuming way in which we made an all new one from stratch!!!! so to speak

JodelFlieger
Member
Posts: 144
Joined: 07 Aug 2007 18:17
Location: Ireland

Postby JodelFlieger » 04 Jan 2008 18:09

Hello there
Wooden propellors and other wooden parts, such as the tails of late-model 109s were often built by the furniture industry and not just dedicated aircraft factories. Metal props took longer to machine, heat-treat and repair and required much greater industrial capacity, which is still the case today.
regards
JF

Kurfürst
Member
Posts: 282
Joined: 01 Apr 2005 15:04
Location: Hungary

Postby Kurfürst » 06 Jan 2008 15:18

Wooden propellors were widely used on WW2 fighters, the reason was a technical/design consideration, rather than to save a minimum amount of material. Spitfire IXs for example also used wooden propellors. I guess the prime reason was weight/centre of gravity issues, rather than any other. Wooden propellers also have an advantage that if they hit the ground, they break and probably won`t wreck the engine internals so badly... the downside is, like all wooden parts, they are far more sensitive to weather and humidity.

The wooden tails of 109s weren`t either some material saving issue, it was just that the tails themselves were not very sensitive parts, and wooden units could be made elsewhere using the woodworking industry, and so metalworking industry is freed up in capacity.

willerving
Member
Posts: 3
Joined: 08 Feb 2008 21:57
Location: NY USA

Russian Yaks also had wood and steel propellers

Postby willerving » 09 Feb 2008 05:27

From the 1940's right up to the 1980's

User avatar
Topspeed
Member
Posts: 4316
Joined: 15 Jun 2004 15:19
Location: Finland

Re: Wooden propeller in Fw 190 D and others

Postby Topspeed » 21 Jan 2017 13:49

Also the FW 154 was entirely out of wood. Wood epoxies are nowadays stronger so in fact you could make better aeroplanes outa wood than metal...far better....and simpler to make than carbon..and cheaper. Weldwood, Duramold etc were in use in 30Iies, but no good epoxies were at hand.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
Topspeed
Member
Posts: 4316
Joined: 15 Jun 2004 15:19
Location: Finland

Re:

Postby Topspeed » 21 Jan 2017 13:56

phylo_roadking wrote:Laminated wooden propellors were, in certain shapes, curves and pitches - intrinsically stronger than shaped tubular metal, allowing higher revolutions and airspeeds...very much like carbon fibre blades recently. The downside is they take longer to produce - correct woods need to be selected, seasoned, laminated, formed by soaking and tensioning and finally shaped.

Staypak and compreg are the procedures to make 4 x stronger woodcomposite as aluminium. The pressure in such press is enermous and heat so it is not easy. It no longer sucks water like wood after that treatment. You can make it outa practically any wood...even low density pine can be pressed beyond the density of Duramold of the colonel Clark at the Hughes Aircraft Company with todays epoxies.


Return to “Luftwaffe air units and Luftwaffe in general”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot]