BULGARIAN Army in 1920s-1930s (organization, equipment)

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BIGpanzer
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Motor vehicles in Bulgarian Army between WWI-WWII

Postby BIGpanzer » 30 Dec 2004 22:59

Hello, Dibo!
Hello, AJK!

Great information about Bulgarian generals of 1920-1939! You help me a lot! Even much more!
As for Bulgarian commanders - I had almost nothing information before, just a few names, but I have something about the motor vehicles, were used in Bulgarian Army before 1940. May be this is also interesting for you and, probably, you could add some info to this list (for example, another models, photos, or find some mistakes)...

Reconnaissance and commanders two-axis cars

1. Phanomen Granit 30 - delivered in 1936 (62 units)
2. Tempo G-200 - delivered in 1936-1941 (5 or more units)
3. Fiat 508 - delivered in 1934 (? units)
4. Opel P4 - delivered in 1936 (100 units)

Commander, passenger and cargo three-axis cars

1. Steyr 440-B - delivered in 1937 (333 units)
2. Tatra 72 - delivered in 1936 (? units)

Tractors

1. Pavesi-Fiat model P.4-100 P.C.26 - delivered in 1930
2. Pavesi-Fiat model P.4-100 P.C.30 - delivered in 1935 (100 or more units)
3. Pavesi-Fiat model P.4-100 P.C.30A - delivered in 1938 (50 or more units)
4. Allis Chalmers WKO - delivered in 1938 (? units)

Trucks

1. Mercedes-Benz Lo-2000 - delivered in 1936-1937 (336 units)
2. Mercedes-Benz L-3000 - delivered in 1935-1943 (? units)
3. Krupp L2H42 - delivered in 1935 (120 units)
4. Citroen 5 - delivered in 1932 (? units)
5. Renault unknown model - delivered in 1926 (? units)
6. Ford BB - delivered in 1931 (? units)
7. Wikov unknown model - delivered in 1939 (? units)
8. Opel Liferwagen - delivered in 1936 (? units)
9. Opel Blitz 3.6-36 - delivered in 1939-1944 (1930 units)

Ambulances

1. Phanomen Granit-25 - delivered in 1936-1941 (250 units)

Special vehicles

1. Krupp-bakery L2H42 - delivered in 1935 (? units)
2. Mersedes-Benz radiostation - delivered in 1936 (? units)
3. Mersedes-Benz cistern L-3000 - delivered in 1935 (? units)
4. Bussing-sound-ranging central unknown model - delivered in 1938 (? units)
5. Krupp-butcher L2H42 - delivered in 1935 (? units)
6. Crysler-radio range unknown model - delivered in 1934 (? units)

Note: Unfortunately, I still not have the book "Equipment and Armour in the Bulgarian Army": Armoured Vehicles 1935 - 1945 (Trucks, Tractors and Automobiles 1935-45) by Kaloyan Matev, but would like to buy it.


Happy New Year! Good luck in your life in 2005! Have an excellent mood during 2005!
BIGPanzer
Last edited by BIGpanzer on 03 Jan 2005 11:25, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby BIGpanzer » 02 Jan 2005 12:41

Also one question - according to Neuilly Treaty Bulgaria could have small amount of armored cars, but I have no information about the types and amount of armored cars in Bulgarian Army in interwar period. Do you know something about this?

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Postby dibo » 02 Jan 2005 14:03

BIGpanzer wrote:Also one question - according to Neuilly Treaty Bulgaria could have small amount of armored cars, but I have no information about the types and amount of armored cars in Bulgarian Army in interwar period. Do you know something about this?


No armoured cars until 1943 when 20 Sd Kfz 222 and 223 were supplied for the Recon Bn of the Armoured Brigade.

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Postby BIGpanzer » 02 Jan 2005 14:26

Hi, Dibo!
Ok, I knew about Germans Sd.Kfz. 222 and 223 in Bulgarian Army during WWII, but I thought that I had no information about armored cars before WWII. Now you cleared up the situation - simply, there were no armored cars in Bulgaria in 1920s-1930s. Thank you very much!
Could you add something to my list of motor vehicles of Bulgarian Army in interwar period, if you'll have a possibility (see, please, my reply from 30.12.2004)?

Best regards, BIGpanzer

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Postby dibo » 02 Jan 2005 15:49

No, your list is incomplete, but AFAIK correct. I have not seen a complete list of the motor vehicles used in the Bulgarian army, but the book you refer to (I have it) could provide you with some answers to your questions.

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Postby BIGpanzer » 02 Jan 2005 16:28

Ok, I'll try to complete the list of motor vehicles in pre-WWII Bulgarian Army by myself.

As for the book by K. Matev about armored vehicles of Bulgaria in 1935-1945 - does it contain some info about motorcycles? I only know that Bulgarian Army used German BMW R-12 and AWO during WWII, but have no information about their exact amount (probably, 18 of BMW R-12) and years of delivery to Bulgaria, as well as about other models of motorcycles in Bulgarian service.

Best regards

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Postby dibo » 02 Jan 2005 17:31

BIGpanzer wrote:Ok, I'll try to complete the list of motor vehicles in pre-WWII Bulgarian Army by myself.

As for the book by K. Matev about armored vehicles of Bulgaria in 1935-1945 - does it contain some info about motorcycles? I only know that Bulgarian Army used German BMW R-12 and AWO during WWII, but have no information about their exact amount (probably, 18 of BMW R-12) and years of delivery to Bulgaria, as well as about other models of motorcycles in Bulgarian service.

Best regards


I'l see what I can find on your vehicle lists :)

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Postby Panzergenadier » 02 Jan 2005 18:36

Hello!!! Just saw this tread and now to work.

PLANES IN THE BULGARIAN AIRFORCE 1918-1945

FIGHTERS
Avia B-135"Swallow"(Czech)-12 delivered
Avia B-534 "Dogan"(Czech) - ?
Arado Ar-65 " Eagle"(German) - 12 delivered
Devoatin de-520(French) - 100 delivered tropheys of Germany after the occupation of France
Messerschmidt Bf-109 E-4"Arrow"(German) - ?
Messerschmidt Bf-109 G-series(German) - 145 delivered(G-2 and G-6 , the G-4s were very few from Romania
PZL-24 "Hawk"(Polish)-?
Heinkel He-51B "Falcon"(German)-?

BOMBERS AND GROUND ATTACK
Avia B-71 "Crane" (Soviet produced in Czechoslovakia) - ?
Aero MB-200 "Owl" (French Marsel-Bloch MB-200 En-4 produced in Czechoslovakia) - ?
Dornier Do-11 "Bat"(Bulgarians called it "Flying coffin") (german)- ?
Dornier Do-17 Ka "Hurricane" (German) - ? (found in Yugoslavia and brought to Plovdiv)
Dornier do-17 M/P-2 "Hurricane" (Gernman) - ?
Letow-Schmolik 328(Czech) - ?
PZL-43B(Polish)- ?
Focke-Wulf 58(German)-?
Junkers Ju-87 D-4"Stuka" - ?

RECONNAISSANSE
Aero A-304 - ?
Messerscmidt Bf-108 "Swan" -?
Nardy F.N.305 (Italian) - 1 (In 1943 the Italian attache tried to escape with that plane3 in Turkey but he and his aircraft were captured)
Potez-XVIII(French)-?
Fieseler-Storch Fi-156 (german)- ?
Focke-Wulf FW-189 A-2 "Cyclop" (German)
Heinkel He-45A "Stork" - ?
Junkers A-20- ?

TRAINING
Avia B-122(Czech) - ?
Henrio de Ash-XIV(French) - ?
Bristol 83A (British) - ?
Bristol 88A(British) - ?
Buker Bu-131(Geraman)- ?
Buker Bu-181(German) - ?
Codron S-59 (French) - ?
Letow Sh-18(Czech) - ?
PWS-26 "Hero" (Polish) - 2(two polish pilots flew to Bulgaria in 1939 to avoid German captivity)
Potez VIII(French) - ?
Focke-Wulf FW-43(German) - 1 (a gift from the German Ministero of the Aviation Gen. Milch)
Focke-Wulf FW-44 "Sparow"(German) - ?
Focke-Wulf FW-56 "Mosquito" - ?
Heinkel He-72 "Canary"

TRANSPORT
Albatros L-73 (German)- 2(gift from Lufthansa)
Codron-440 (French)- 1(later given back )
Junkers W-34 (German) - ?(captured after Sept. 1944)
Junkers F-13 (German) - ?
Junkers Ju-52/3m "Barn-owl" (German) - ?
Focke-Wulf A-20"Roselius" (German)- 1(gift from Dr. Roselius, the German tradå representative in Bulgaria)
Heinkel He-111 (German) - ?

HYDROPLANES
Avro-522 (British) - ?
Arado Ar-196A-3 (German) -12(today only 1 still exists near Plovdiv in the museum and it is the only A-3 in the world left)
Macci Che-18 (Italian) - ?
Heinkel He-42"Duck" (German) - ?
Heinkel He-60 E-2 "Seal" - ?

That's it!!! In future I'll try to find info about the missing numbers and provide info about the airplanes produced in Bulgaria. By the way are you interested in Bulgarian helmets?

Panzergrenadier

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Postby dibo » 02 Jan 2005 22:33

Hmm, the reinforcements have finally arrived :wink:

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Bulgarian military aircrafts of interwar period - part I

Postby BIGpanzer » 02 Jan 2005 22:51

Hello, Panzergrenadier!
Hello, Dibo!

I hope that with your help as Bulgarians we could sum up the information about all aspects of Bulgarian Army (equipment, organisation and uniform) from the period between world wars (1920-1939). There is a few information in literature and Internet about Bulgarian Army as well, this is not a well known theme, unfortunately. Thanks to Dibo and AJK - they helped me a lot. And, of course, it will be interesting for many guys here.

Panzergrenadier, thank you very much for the interesting info about types of Bulgarian military airplanes of 1918-1945. I have some materials about Bulgarian Air Force, too (several books and articles). And Dibo already sent me a lot of info about organisation and equipment of Bulgarian Air Force of interwar period. So lets complete together the list of Bulgarian military aircrafts in 1920-1940.

Now what I remember that after WWI in accordance with the terms of the Treaty of Neuilly all Bulgarian Army's aviation squadrons (Army Aviation Corps) were disbanded and their equipment destroyed, except one, which carried out the police functions.

In 1924 Bulgaria could get the permission to build the aircraft factory and to buy some modern aircrafts: Hanriot HD-14, Potez XVII (30 were exported to Bulgaria), Bristol P.T.M. and Avro 552. The first aircrafts, were built at Bulgarian aircraft factory DAR (Derzhavna Aeroplanna Rabotilnitsa), were DAR U-1 - the copy of German DFW CV.

Until mid-1930s the Bulgarian aviation had a very critical shortage of pilots and aircrafts. In the mid 1930s the Bulgarian government established the nucleus of an clandestine Air Force by gathering together a varied collection of aircraft. The new Bulgarian Royal Air Force (Bulgarski Voennovazdushni Sili - BVVS) remained an integral part of the army. By 1937 the restrictions of the Treaty were openly renounced and a rapid expansion of the air arm initiated. Germany began to strengthen its military aviation very fast and Bulgaria follow to German's example, starting to create full Air Forces, which in 1940 consisted of 1st front division (36 PZL 43 and 11 training aircrafts of different types), 2nd fighter division (60 Avia B-534 and 12 training aircrafts of different types), 3rd reconnaissance division (48 Letov S-328 and 12 training aircrafts of different types), 5th bomber division (36 Avia B-71 (SB) and 12 training Aero M.B.200), flying-training division (11 He 51, 9 PZL 43, 11 PZL 24), officer's flying school (19 FW 44 and 42 training aircrafts of different types) and flying school (52 training aircrafts of different types).

Notes:
a) Polish light bomber PZL P-43A, B "Karas" or "Tchaika" - an export version, was produced in Poland for Bulgaria, 12 + 42 were delivered in late 1937 - March 1939 (engine Gnome-Rhone 14Ks, 920 hp or Gnome-Rhone 14N 01, 970 hp, correspondingly; elongated fuselage; modified cockpit; armament - 2 x 7.9mm Wz in the bow, 1 x 7.7mm Vickers F in the upper weapon emplacement; 1 x 7.7mm Vickers F in the lower weapon emplacement; up to 600 kg bombs).
Fighter PZL P-24B "Yastreb" was an export version for Bulgaria (with modified cowls of landing gear, 4 x 7.9 mm; 50 kg of bombs), 14 were delivered since 1938. Also some sources report that PZL P-24C, F were also delivered in 1938-1939 (20 + 24).
Reconnaissance LWS-3 "Mewa" B (engine Fiat A.74 - 860 hp, three-blade propeller with variable pitch, modified equipment) - 60 aircrafts were ordered by Bulgaria (1938?), not belonging to a compete set. Some LWS-3 were evacuated from Poland to Bulgaria in September 1939 after beginning of WWII.
b) Biplan fighters Avia B-534 "Dogan", reconnaissance bombers Letov-Shmolik 328 "Vrana", twin-engine bombers Avia B-71 "Jerav" (licence Soviet SB-2M-100A) and twin-engine bombers Aero M.B.200 were bought by Bulgarian mission to German-annexed Czechoslovakia in 1939. 60-72 of Avia B-534, 60 of Letov S-328, 36 Avia B-71 and 12-18 Aero (Bloch) M.B.200En-4 were delivered to Bulgaria. One twin-engine Czechoslovakian reconnaissance bomber Aero A-304 was also delivered to Bulgaria.
c) German fighters He 51B "Sokol" were delivered since 1938 (20 aircrafts) and training airplanes Focke-Wulf Fw 44J "Stieglitz" or "Vrabche" were delivered since November 1937 (42 aircrafts).
Also Bulgaria had in 1939 following German aircrafts: twin-engine bomber Dornier Do 11 (since 1937, 12 aircrafts); twin-engine transport plane Focke-Wulf Fw 58 "Weihe" (since 1939, 17 aircrafts); float training seaplane Heinkel He 42 (since 1938, 2 aircrafts, were used by Bulgarian Air Force for coastguard); reconnaissance bomber Heinkel He 45 (since 1937, >12 aircrafts); reconnaissance Heinkel He 46C-2 (? year, 18 aircrafts with NACA engine jacket, special order of Bulgaria); three-engine transport plane Junkers Ju 52 (since 1938, 2 aircrafts).


Bulgarian Air Force in 1939 also had several models of domestically produced aircrafts:

1. Reconnaissance and auxiliary aircraft DAR-3 "Garvan" (Laz-3)
It was used also as a communications, training and auxiliary aircraft. 21 (with prototypes) were produced since 1929.
This biplane had three modifications - "Garvan-I" (with engine Wright Cyclone SGR-1820 F3 - 7 cyl., 650 hp; 6 were produced); "Garvan-II" (modified by Tsvetan Lazarov, with engine (but consignment of engines had some defects) Siemens "Jupiter-VI" - 9 cyl., 650 hp, three-blade propeller, new landing gear and tail, partly closed cockpit; 6 were produced) and "Garvan-III" (1939, with engine Alfa Romeo 126 RC34 - 9 cyl., 780 hp, with NACA cowl; it was an excellent multi-role plane; 12 were produced).
Specifications of DAR-3 "Garvan-I", 1936: engine - 1 x Wright Cyclone SGR-1820 F3 - 7 cyl., 630 hp; wing span - 11.90/10.75 m; length - 9.17 m; wing area - 37.00 sq.m; empty weight - 1300 kg; flying weight - 1950 kg; speed - 250 km/h (at 1000 m); range - 700 km; ceiling - 6850 m; armament - 1 x 7.92mm MG in the cockpit (for the observer); crew - 2.
Specifications of DAR-3 "Garvan-III", 1939: engine - 1 x Alfa Romeo 126 RC34 - 7 cyl., 750 hp; wing span - 11.90/10.75; length - 9.46; wing area - 37.00 sq.m; empty weight - 1300 kg; flying weight - 2100 kg; speed - 275 km/h; range - 1000 km; ceiling - 7000 m; armament - 1 x 7.92mm MG in the bow for the pilot, 1 x 7.92mm MG in the cockpit for the observer; bombs up to 200 kg; crew - 2.

2. Training aircraft DAR-6 (Laz-1)
It was used also as a communications aircraft. DAR-6 was built up, using the basis of FW 44. 62 were produced since 1932. This biplane had two modifications - DAR-6 (with engine Walter Mars - 145 hp) and DAR-6A (base-training version with engine Walter Vega - 85 hp).
Specifications of DAR-6: engine - 1 x Walter Mars (145 hp) or 1 x Siemens Sh-14A (7 cyl., 160 hp); wing span - 9.05 m; length - 6.85; height - 2.85 m; wing area - 19.30 sq.m; empty weight - 510 kg; flying weight - 770-920 kg; speed - 175-185 km/h (at the ground); rate of climb - 3000 m for 12 min; range - 715 km; ceiling - 4200-4500 m; crew - 1 + 1.

3. Communications and training aircraft SFKB KB-4 "Tchutchuliga-II"
It was used also as a close reconnaissance and light bomber aircraft, but mainly was used in flying schools. 28 were produced in 1938-1940 by "Samoletna Fabrika Caproni Bulgarski" (engineer K. Kaligaris) in Kazanlyk. This biplane of mixed construction and fixed landing gear had two-blade propeller and dual control.
Specifications of KB-4: engine - 1 x Wright E1P-975 Whirlwind with Taunend's cowl (9 cyl., 220 hp) or later 1 x Walter Castor II; wing span - 11.54 m; length - 8.615; wing area - 31.87 sq.m; empty weight - 1070 kg; flying weight - 1480 kg; speed - 208 km/h (at the ground); rate of climb - 180 m/min; range - 700 km; ceiling - 6500 m; armament - 1 x 7.69mm Vickers F in the cockpit (for the observer); crew - 2.

4. Reconnaissance and communications aircraft SFKB KB-5 "Tchutchuliga-III"
It was used also as a light bomber aircraft. KB-5 was built up, using the basis of KB-4. 45 were produced in 1939-1940. KB-5 was adopted in Air Force since the end of 1939 and was used for reconnaissance of Yugoslavian borders. This biplane had two-blade propeller, modified landing gear and bow of fuselage, enlarged fuel-supply, upper wing with reduced span.
Specifications of KB-5: engine - 1 x Walter Pollux II (9 cyl., 450 hp); wing span - 10.90/8.85 m; length - 8.850 m; wing area - 25.40 sq.m; empty weight - 1250 kg; flying weight - 1650 kg; speed - 275 km/h (at the ground); range - 800 km; ceiling - 6800 m; armament - 1 x 7.7mm FK-33 in the bow (for the pilot), 1 x 7.7mm FK-36 in the cockpit (for the observer); up to 8 x 25 kg bombs; crew - 2.


Also some info about Bulgarian aircraft markings (1920-1939) .
During the summer of 1918, a specifically Bulgarian national marking was introduced. This consisted of a black Saltire cross on a white square and it was carried on the wings and fuselage sides. This marking does not appear to have been widely used in 1918-1920, with most aircraft retaining German national insignia (German cross). Also cross of St. Andrei (green "X" on white square) joined already the service.
In 1918-1920, Bulgarian naval planes carried a triangle in the national colors and a black lion rampant.
Between 1920-1937 Bulgarian military aircrafts were officially manned and all aircrafts in Bulgaria had civil registration according to Neuilly Treaty (B-B*** and later LZ-***). The civil registration was marked in black on the fuselage and wings, with the national colours displayed in vertical stripes on the rudder. On some aircraft the rudder stripes were white, green and red (front to rear), while others displayed them red, green and white (front to rear). A large black 'B' was sometimes added on the fin to indicate Bulgaria.
With the official establishment of a small Air Force in 1937, a new national insignia was introduced and used in 1937-1938, in the form of a roundel in the national colours. The rudder marking is not known.
In 1938 a completely new rather intricate national insignia was officially introduced and used in 1938-1941 till Bulgaria became the German ally in WWII. This marking was based on the royal coat of arms and consisted of a rampant red lion on a red and yellow Maltese cross (Bulgarian Cross for Bravery) with two yellow crossed swords, painted on a round white background. On a few aircraft a red outline was applied to the fuselage roundel. The rudder marking consisted of horizontal stripes in the national colours - white, green and red from top to bottom.
Aside from national markings, many of Bulgaria's individual squadrons had specific insignia just for aircraft in their squadron. Art work such as flying dragons, eagles carrying bombs, devils, and similar adorned many aircraft in Bulgaria's Air Force.

Ok, now I got a little bit tired (worked several hours on this reply), :) :)

P.S. As for Bulgarian helmets - I am interested a little bit, know that in Bulgarian Army the M 16 (German WWI type) and later, since 1937, the M 36 types A,B,C were used (which were produced in Czechoslovakia at Sandrik - Dolne Hamre; Bruder Gottlieb und Brauchbar - Brun and Bratri factories). On the left side of the Bulgarian helmet was a three-colour (as Bulgarian flag) shield, on the right side - the red shield with golden Bulgarian lion rampant (sometimes not used). But that is almost all that I know :D

The photos are from http://www.geocities.com/bulgarian_aviation/ and http://www.airwar.ru

Bulgarian light auxiliary and reconnaissance airplane DAR-3 "Garvan-I" (1936, 6 copies)
with armament 1 x 7.92mm MG in the cockpit (for the observer) + light bombs up to 200 kg

Bulgarian light bomber and reconnaissance airplane KB-4 "Tchutchuliga-II" (1938-1940, 28 copies)
with armament 1 x 7.69mm Vickers F in the cockpit (for the observer) + light bombs up to 200 kg
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Bulgarian Aircraft's Factories of interwar period

Postby BIGpanzer » 04 Jan 2005 18:09

By the way, what do Bulgarian names of military aircrafts mean? "Tchuchuliga", "Garvan" and others, see, please, my previous reply. If I made some mistakes in Bulgarian names of aircrafts, factories etc, please, let me know. Unfortunately, I don't know the Bulgarian language, only know Cyrillic alphabet and can understand Bulgarian a little (simple texts only) :) .

Do you know the names and location of Bulgarian military airfields and naval air base(s) of interwar period, as well as Bulgarian pilot's schools?


As for the aircraft's factories - as I understand there were two in Bulgaria in 1920s-1930s:
1. DAR (Derzhavna Aeroplanna Rabotilnitsa or State Airplane Workshop) in Sofia (Bojurishte), which was founded by Bulgarian government's decree in 1924-1925 with the help of German engineers (especially of Herman Wilter - the first chief of DAR's design office). Also Bulgarian engineers Kiril Petkov and Tsvetan Lazarov played a big role in the appearance of Bulgarian aircraft building. The first DAR aircrafts were the copies of German WWI aircrafts.
2. SFKB (Samoletna Fabrika Caproni Bulgarski or Airplane Factory Bulgarian Caproni) in Kazanlyk, which was finished in December 1926 (Czechoslovakian AERO-Praga branch at first, then it was bought by Italian "Caproni di Milano" in 1930, which concluded a treaty for 10 years of its exploitation).
3. Also DSF (Derzhavna Samoletna Fabrika or State Airplane Factory) in Lovech was built by Polish project shortly before WWII to produce Polish aircrafts for Bulgarian Air Force. But it started to work as aircraft-repair factory only during WWII.

Also tomorrow I will try to add some info to the full list of Bulgarian aircrafts of 1920-1939 (started by Panzergrenadier), it seems quite easy, but in reality not so, because Bulgaria had a lot of different models of foreign and several native aircrafts and the information about them (amount, years of service etc.) is contradictory. So your help, dear friends, is welcome!!!!

Bulgarian aircraft markings see here:

1938-1941
Image

1937-1938
Image

1918-1920
Image
Last edited by BIGpanzer on 19 Sep 2005 18:48, edited 10 times in total.

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Postby Panzergenadier » 04 Jan 2005 19:28

Hello, BIGpanzer!!! Garvan = crow and Tchuchuliga=skylark.

Here are some of the aircraft built in Bulgaria:
DAR"Uzunov-1"
DAR-2
DAR-1A
DAR-3
DAR-4(prototype)
DAR-5(prototype)
DAR-6
DAR-6A
DAR-7(project)
DAR-7 SS.1(Samolet za Svruzka-comunication aircraft)
DAR-8"Slavei"("Nightingale")
DAR-9"Siniger"("Titmouse")
DAR-10"Bekas"("Snipe")
KB-1"Peperuda"("Butterfly")
KB-2 UT("Instructor-Training")
KB-2A "Tchutchuliga"("Skylark")
KB-3 "Tchutchuliga-I"
KB-4 "Tchutchuliga-II"
KB-5"Tchutchuliga-III"
KB-309(KB-6)"Papagal"("Parrot")
KB-11"Fazan"("Pheasant")


Panzergrenadier

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My two-part article on Bulgarian aviation industry

Postby DenesBernad » 04 Jan 2005 23:29

For details on Bulgarian aviation industry - including a complete list of indigenous aircraft types, numbers manufactured, etc. - you may check out my two-part article, titled 'Balkan Birds. Thirty-five years of Bulgarian aircraft production', published in AIR Enthusiast, Issues Nos. 94 & 96/2001.

Dénes

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Bulgarian military aircrafts of interwar period (full list)

Postby BIGpanzer » 05 Jan 2005 16:54

Thanks, Denes for the reference to your articles about Bulgarian aviation.
I'll try to find them.

Guys!
I am also trying to make the full list of the aircrafts (foreign and native), were used by Bulgaria in 1920 - 1939. Some info about native Bulgarian aircrafts (DAR, Bulgarian Caproni), I think, are from Denes's articles (!!!!), but I found it in Internet.

Here it is (some info was repeated with above one, so sorry...)

Note: according to the Treaty of Neuilly the planes in the future Bulgarian civil aviation could be bought only from the countries that won the WWI and the capacity of the engine (or the summary capacity of all engines for one plane) could not exceed more than 180 hp.

*************************************************************************************

Aero A.304 "Pelican" (Czechoslovakia, 1 were on service in 1939-1943)

Aero (Bloch) MB.200BN4 "Buhal" (Czechoslovakia, France, 18 (6 Aero + 12 Bloch) MB.200 "Buhal" (owl) were on service in 1939-1941 for the bomber role and patrol of the Black Sea coast)

Albatros L.73 (Germany, 2 were delivered in 1929 or 1932? as ex-Lufthansa passenger aircrafts)

Arado Ar 65F "Orel" (Germany, 12 biplane fighters Ar 65 "Orel" (eagle) were delivered from manufacturer in 1936 or 1937 and were used for the utility transport till 1940. Military register number - 7026. This was the first fighter (officially) in the Bulgarian aviation after WWI)

Avia Av-135 "Ljastuvka" (Czechoslovakia, 12 were obtained in 1939)

Avia B.71 "Jerav" (Czechoslovakia, license-built Soviet bomber Tupolev SB-2M-100, 32 B.71 "Jerav" (crane) were delivered in September 1939)

Avia B.122 "Osa" (Czechoslovakia, 28 B.122 "Osa" (wasp) were obtained in 1939. The version with the Avia RK-17 355 hp engine was used to pull air targets and withdrawn from service in 1940. The version with Walter Kastor II 260 hp engine was probably a single airplane with registration number: LZ-TAD)

Avia B.534 "Dogan" (Czechoslovakia, 78 biplane fighters B.534 "Dogan" (kestrel) of the IV serie were obtained in 1939, military registration number - 7037. Used for air defence of Bulgaria)

Avro 552 (UK, at least 2 floatplane biplanes were delivered in 1923 (first post-WWI imported aircrafts). The Avro 552 was a conversion of the Avro 504K using the Wolseley Viper in-line engine from the wartime S.E.5A fighter and mounted on twin wooden floats. Used on the Black Sea coast for advanced pilot training in 1923-1924, registration numbers: B-BAHA and B-BBAH)

Bloch BS-122 "Osa" (France, 27 were delivered since 1939)

Bloch BS-222 (France, 1 obtained in 1939)

Boginov (Bulgaria, built by Georgi Boginov in 1926)

Bristol P.T.M./83A "Lucifer" (UK, 1 was delivered in April 1926, following an offer by Bristol in October 1924 to supply 6. The type was variously known as the Bristol Trainer, Bristol Primary Trainer and P.T.M. (Primary Training Machine) or Type 83A. The aircraft was fitted with a Bristol Lucifer IV engine of 120 hp, registration number: B-BEPK 6936)

Bristol 88 "Tourer" (UK, 4 were ordered from the manufacturer by Bulgarian Department of Posts and Telegraphs in August 1923. The Tourer was a reconditioned Bristol Fighter adapted for civil training and transport use. The Bulgarian aircrafts were fitted with in-line 180 hp Wolseley Viper engines. 2 aircrafts, designated "Bulgarian Tourer" or Type 88 (29) were delivered to Bojourishe, near Sofia in April 1924. The balance of the order was held pending service trials. 3 further aircrafts of improved specification ordered in April 1926, and delivered in May 1926. The second batch was designated "Improved Bulgarian Tourer" or Type 88A (29A) and featured a revised radiator design. Registration numbers: B-BECA 6383, B-BEHA 6384, B-BEBA 6937, B-BETO 6938, B-BEKA 6939)

Bucker Bu 131B "Jungmann", "Ljastovitza" (Germany, 10-15 Bu 131 "Ljastovitza" (swallow) were delivered from manufacturer in 1937 or 1938. Used for the utility transport and trainer till 1940. Registration number: LZ-BUH, military registration number: 7041)

Caudron C-59 (France, 5 were obtained in 1924 and used as training aircrafts. Registration numbers: B-BACO...)

Caudron C.440 or C.444 Goeland (France, this transport aircraft was tested in Bulgaria in August 1936 in Bozhurishte, led by Nikola Kokilev. It showed lower performance than requested, so the deal was cancelled and the airplane flew back to France. Caudron C.448 was not delivered. Registration number: LZ-REA)

DAR DAR U-1/Uzunov-1 (Bulgaria, 7 two-seat biplanes with Benz-IV 220 hp engine delivered from manufacturer by the end of 1925. It was a copy of the German DFW C.Va. Maiden flight was 16 November 1925. Used for primary pilot training, reconnaissance and as a light bomber. Registration numbers:
B-BACA 1, B-BAKO 2, B-BAPA 3, B-BATA 4, B-BATE 5, B-BATO 6, B-BAXA 7)

DAR DAR-1 "Peperuda" (Bulgaria, 12 DAR-1 "Peperuda" (butterfly) two-seat biplanes delivered in 1926. Had Walter NZ radial engine, 60 hp (later retrofitted with Walter Vega). Maiden flight was in 1926. Used for primary pilot training. Withdrawn from service in the early 1940s. Registration numbers: (none) 10, B-BIKA 11 or from late 1927 LZ-IKA, B-BIKB 12 or from late 1927 LZ-IKB, B-BIKC 13 or from late 1927 LZ-IKC, B-BIKD 14 or from late 1927 LZ-IKD, B-BIKE 15 or from late 1927 LZ-IKE, B-BIKF 16 or from late 1927 LZ-IKF, B-BIKH 17 or from late 1927 LZ-IKH, B-BIKK 18 or from late 1927 LZ-IKK, B-BIKL 19 or from late 1927 LZ-IKL, B-BIKM 20 or from late 1927 LZ-IKM, B-BIKN 21 or from late 1927 LZ-IKN)

DAR DAR-1A (Bulgaria, 8 delivered in 1928. This upgraded version of DAR-1 had Walter Vega engine, 85 hp. Used for primary pilot training. Withdrawn from service in the early 1940s. Registration numbers: LZ-IKP 35, LZ-IKR 36, LZ-IKS 37, LZ-IKT 38, LZ-IKU 39, LZ-IKV 40, LZ-IKX 41, LZ-IKZ 42)

DAR DAR-2 (Bulgaria, 12 delivered from manufacturer late 1926-1927. Design closely based on German Albatros C.III with Mercedes D.III 160 hp engine. Used for pilot and observer training in Aviation School. Registration numbers: B-BOPA 22, B-BOPB 23, B-BOPC 24, B-BOPD 25, B-BOPE 26, B-BOPF 27, B-BOPI 28, B-BOPK 29, B-BOPL 30, B-BOPM 31, B-BOPN 32, B-BOPO 33)

DAR DAR-3 prototypes (Bulgaria, DAR-3 "Garvan" (raven) two-seat biplane first prototype was rebuild twice. First prototype - DAR-3(I) - maiden flight was Autumn 1927 with in-line Loraine-Dietrich W-type engine, 400 hp. In 1930 it was fitted with a Gnome et Rhone Jupiter 9Akx radial engine, 480 hp and shortly afterwards it was modified again by T. Lazarov with enlarged fin and rudder and revised main landing gear (referred to as the "second prototype"). It was written off in a fatal crash in 14 February 1934. A second aircraft - DAR-3(I.bis) "third prototype" was flown in 1929. In 1935 it was modified with Wright Cyclone engine and triangular pointed fin. Intended role - short-range reconnaissance/light bomber. Registration numbers: B-BDIA 34 or later LZ-BDIA, LZ-DIA for DAR 3(I), (none) 43 for DAR-3(I.bis))

DAR DAR-3 "Garvan I" (Bulgaria, 6 DAR-3 "Garvan I" (raven) aircraft delivered from manufacturer in 1936. Mixed construction, open cockpit and Wright Cyclone R-1820 F3, 630 hp radial engine in a Townsend ring. Used for reconnaissance. Registration numbers: LZ-DIB 63, LZ-DIC 64, LZ-DID 65, LZ-DIE 66, LZ-DIF 67, LZ-DIH 68 )

DAR DAR-3 "Garvan II" (Bulgaria, 6 DAR-3 series 2 aircraft delivered from manufacturer in 1937. Open cockpit, wheel spats, Siemens Jupiter VI engine, 650 hp. Later retrofitted with Alfa Romeo 126 RC 34 750 hp engine. Used for reconnaissance. Registration numbers: LZ-DII 69, LZ-DIK 70, LZ-DIL 71, LZ-DIM 72, LZ-DIN 73, LZ-DIO 74)

DAR DAR-3 "Garvan III" (Bulgaria, 12 DAR-3 series 3 aircraft delivered from manufacturer in 1939 and used till 1945. Alfa Romeo 126 RC34 750 hp engine in longer cowling, driving a three-bladed two-position metal propeller. Cockpit canopy for pilot but not gunner, lengthened fuselage, revised landing gear. Used by Bulgarian AF for training, reconnaissance and army co-operation (multi-role airplane). Registration numbers: 76-87. Military registration number for DAR-3: 7056)

DAR DAR-4 prototype (Bulgaria, this passenger airplane (2 crew and 4 passengers) with 3 x 145 hp engines was built in 1930)

DAR DAR-5 "Brambar" prototype (Bulgaria, 1 DAR-5 "Brambar" (beetle) prototype. Maiden flight was in 1930. It was a single-seat biplane with 220 hp engine. Intended as a trainer but there was no production order and instead it was used for meteorological reconnaissance and liaison. Registration number: LZ-UDA 44)

DAR DAR-6 prototypes (Bulgaria, 2 DAR-6 prototypes (two-seat training biplanes). First prototype - DAR-6(I) - maiden flight was on 19 January 1932, it was used till 1937. It had Walter Mars radial engine (85 hp) with narrow Townsend ring. Second prototype - DAR-6(II) - flew in 1934 (1937?). Uncovered Walter Vega radial engine, 145 hp. Intended as a trainer but no production order. Registration numbers: LZ-BZL 45 for DAR-6(I), (none) 46? for DAR-6(II))

DAR DAR-6A prototype (Bulgaria, 1 DAR-6A prototype. Two-seat biplane trainer with Siemens Sh-14A 160 hp engine. Airframe based on Fw 44 Stieglitz, with He 72 nose and modified tail section. Maiden flight was circa 1938. No production. Registration number: LZ-ZLB 62)

DAR DAR-7 SS.1 prototype (Bulgaria, 1 DAR-7 SS.1 prototype. Two-seat light sports monoplane with enclosed cockpit and 130 hp engine. Maiden flight was circa 1935. No production. By 1937 "carrying military markings". Date withdrawn from service not known but scrapped during the late 1930s. Registration number: ? 46)

DAR DAR-8 "Slavey" (Bulgaria, 12 DAR-8 "Slavey" (nightingale) biplane delivered from manufacturer in 1935 or 1938?. First single-seat prototype had de Havilland Gipsy major in-line engine, 145 hp. Production aircraft (two-seat) had Walter Major IV in-line engine, 130 hp. Installation of Walter Mars radial resulted in designation DAR-8A. Used for training and aerobatics. Registration numbers: LZ-BAA 47, LZ-BAB 48 and in 1938 to DAR-8A, LZ-BAC 49, LZ-BAD 50 and in 1938 to DAR-8A, LZ-BAE 51, LZ-BAF 52, LZ-BAH 53, LZ-BAI 54, LZ-BAK 55, LZ-BAL 56, LZ-BAM 57, LZ-BAM 58 )

Dornier Do 11 "Prilep" (Germany, 12 twin-engine Do 11 "Prilep" (bat) were delivered from manufacturer in 1937. Came with registration numbers: D-AMIN, D-AQUR… Used for the bomber role. Withdrawn from service in 1941)

Focke-Wulf A20a "Roselius" (Germany, at least 1 was delivered from manufacturer in 1930 (as the gift of German trade representative, Dr. L. Roselius). Used as transport aircraft with registration number: B-BROS 52)

Focke-Wulf Fw 43 "Milka" (Germany, at least 1 Fw 43 delivered from manufacturer in 1939 as a gift from general Milch and used as transport aircraft. Registration number: LZ-MIL)

Focke-Wulf Fw 44J "Stieglitz" or "Vrabche" (Germany, 42 Fw 44J "Vrabche" (sparrow) were purchased from the manufacturer in 1936-1939 (6 aircrafts delivered in 1936, 6 more in 1938 and 30 in 1939). Used for the training role. Withdrawn from service in 1940. Registration number: LZ-FOB, military registration number - 7021)

Focke-Wulf Fw 56 "Stosser" or "Komar" (Germany, 6 Fw 56 "Komar" (gnat) were acquired from the manufacturer in 1936 or 10 in 1938? Used for the training role. Withdrawn from service in 1940)

Focke-Wulf Fw 58B, C-2, KB-2,3 "Weihe" or "Golob" (Germany, 10 Fw 58B "Golob" (dove) were acquired from the manufacturer in 1939 or 2 in 1937 and six more in 1939, making a total of 8. Another sources give the information about 18 Fw 58B in 1937, 10 FW 58C-2 in 1937 and 6 Fw58 KB-2 and KB-3 in 1939, some sources - 22 in 1938. Used for the training and transport role)

Fokker D.VII (Germany, single seat fighter-biplane. Had BMW-IIIA engine (185 hp), 8 delivered in 1918. 1 was hidden after the peace treaty and used during 1920s as B-BIXP trainer with a second false cabin. Many sources say the machines were 2, but it is more probable that it was a single aircraft)

Grigorov-1 (Bulgaria, 1 two-seat reconnaissance biplane hydroplane with Mercedes D-III engine 150 hp, designed and built by Atanas Grigorov in 1924. The first Bulgarian-designed floatplane. Basic layout based on the Friedrichshafen FF-33 seaplane. Named "Leitenant Liapchev". Evaluated by Bulgarian Navy with favourable results, better than the English Avro-522, but series production cancelled when prototype destroyed in a violent storm in 1925)

Hanriot DH-XIV (Belgium via France?, 4 Hanriot DH-XIV delivered in 1924 and used as training aircrafts. Registration number: B-BRAT...)

Heinkel He 42E "Patitza" (Germany, 2 He 42 "Patitza" (duck) delivered in 1938 (1933?) and used as training hydroplanes. Registration number: LZ-HED)

Heinkel He 45A "Shturkel" (Germany, 12-14 fighters He 45 "Shturkel" (stork) delivered in 1936 or 1937. Used for the reconnaissance role since 1938)

Heinkel He 46C-2 (Germany, 18 delivered in 1937, had NACA cowling; another sources report about He 46 eBu - the export version for Bulgaria wuth engine Panter V, was added to Bulgarian armoury in 1936).

Heinkel He 51B, C "Sokol" (Germany, 12 or 20 He 51 "Sokol" (falcon) delivered in 1936 or 1938. Used in the fighter role. Withdrawn from service in 1940. Military registration number - 7067)

Heinkel He 72 "Kadet" or "Kanarcze" (Germany, 6 He 72 "Kanarcze" (canary) delivered in 1936 or 1938. Used as training aircrafts. Withdrawn from service in 1940. Registration numbers: LZ-HAE, LZ-HAC)

Junkers F-13 (Germany, 2 delivered from manufacturer in 1927 and used as light transport aircraft by BUNAVAD - Bulgarian National Airline Company, opened in October 1927)

Junkers K 23/A 20 "Kuma Lisa" (Germany, 1 delivered in 1930 or 1932. Used as a mail airplane, also as reconnaissance aircraft. Registration number: LZ-UNK)

Junkers Ju 33 (Germany, 2 obtained from the manufacturer in 1923)

Junkers W 34 (Germany, at least 1 passenger aircraft delivered from manufacturer in 1933. But another sources report that it was not officially imported to Bulgaria)

Junkers Ju 52/3m "Sova" (Germany, 2 Ju 52/3m "Sova" (owl) purchased from the manufacturer in 1938. Used for the transport role. Registration numbers: LZ-UNA and LZ-UNB)

Kaproni Bulgarski KB-1 "Peperuda" (Bulgaria, 1 KB-1 "Peperuda" (butterfly) two-seat biplane delivered from manufacturer in 1931 and 6 more in 1932. It was a licenced-built Caproni Ca.100 with Walter NZ radial engine, 120 hp. 2 additional aircrafts finished as seaplanes in 1932. Used for primary pilot training in flying school in Kazanlyk. Registration numbers: LZ-COA 1, LZ-COB 2, LZ-COC 3, LZ-COD 4, LZ-COE 5, LZ-COF 6, LZ-COH 7, (none) 22, (none) 23 )

Kaproni Bulgarski KB-2UT (Bulgaria, 8 two-seat biplanes delivered from manufacturer in 1933-1935. It was a licenced-built Caproni Ca.113 with BMW IVa 250 hp in-line engine, later Junkers L 2, 230 hp and Hispano-Suiza 8Be 250 hp in-line engine fitted. Used for basic and advanced pilot training in Bulgarian army, but had significant disadvantages: low-powered engine, uncomfortable cockpit. Withdrawn from service by September 1939. Registration numbers: LZ-CTA 8, LZ-CTB 9, LZ-CTC 10, LZ-CTD 11, LZ-CTE 12, LZ-CTF 13, LZ-CTH 14, LZ-CTI 15)

Kaproni Bulgarski KB-2A "Chuchuliga" (Bulgaria, 6 KB-2A "Chuchuliga" (lark) delivered from manufacturer in 1936. Improved version of KB-2UT (engineers Kaligaris and Lazarev) with Walter Castor radial engine, 240 hp. Used for advanced pilot training in training regiment in Kazanlyk. Withdrawn from service in the late 1930s. Registration numbers: LZ-CEA 16, LZ-CEB 17, LZ-CEC 18, LZ-CED 19, LZ-CEE 20, LZ-CEF 21)

Kaproni Bulgarski KB-3 "Chuchuliga I" (Bulgaria, 20 KB-3 "Chuchuliga I" (lark) delivered from manufacturer in 1937. Improved version of KB-2A with Walter Castor II radial engine, 340 hp, new fuselage with improved aerodynamics, new cockpits and reinforced landing gear. Used for advanced pilot training in training schools of Bulgarian Air Force. Individual serial numbers 1 to 20, registration numbers: LZ-CIA 25, LZ-CIB 26, LZ-CIC 27, LZ-CID 28, LZ-CIE 29, LZ-CIF 30, LZ-CIG 31, LZ-CIH 32, LZ-CII 33, LZ-CIJ 34, LZ-CIK 35, LZ-CIL 36, LZ-CIM 29, LZ-CIN 30, LZ-CIO 31, LZ-CIP 32, LZ-CIQ 33, LZ-CIR 34, LZ-CIS 35, LZ-CIT 36 )

Kaproni Bulgarski KB-4 "Chuchuliga II" (Bulgaria, 28 delivered from manufacturer in 1938-1939. Improved version of KB-3 with Wright Whirlwind R-975 E-2 radial engine, 220 hp. Used for training, reconnaissance and liaison duties. Military register number for the type was 7022, constructors numbers 45 to 72, individual serial numbers 1 to 28. The 16th aircraft (c/n 40, LZ-CIP) was retained to act as the prototype for the KB-5 with Piaggio P.VII C.I radial engine and longer fuselage)

Kaproni Bulgarski KB-5 "Chuchuliga III" (Bulgaria, 45 delivered from manufacturer in late1939-1940. Differed from the converted KB-4 prototype in having a shorter lower wing, Walter Pollux II radial engine, 450 hp and modified fuselage. Used for training, reconnaissance (for example, Yugoslavian border zone), bomber and liaison duties. Military register number for the type was 7032, constructors numbers 73 to 117, individual serial numbers 1 to 45 )

Lazarow LAZ-3 (Bulgaria, used in 1929-1937)

Letov-Smolik S-18 (Czechoslovakia, 10 delivered in 1925-1926 and used in Airplane school as trainers. Registration numbers: B-BONA, B-BILO, B-BITO, B-BIKO, LZ-ISA)

Letov-Smolik S-328 "Varana" or "Vrana" (Czechoslovakia, 60-62 S-328 "Vrana" (crow) delivered in 1939 and used as the reconnaissance aircrafts and for patrol of the Black Sea coast till 1942)

LWS 3 "Mewa" (Poland, in April 1939 the Bulgarian AF ordered a special version of the LWS 3, fitted with a Fiat A.74RC radial engine, as the Mewa B. The first batch of 60 ordered was scheduled for delivery in early 1940, but was not fulfilled due to the German invasion of Poland in 1939)

Macchi C.18 (Macchi 18/2000) (Italy, 2 flying-boats delivered in 1926 and used by navy. Registration numbers: B-BPAK...)

Potez VIII (France, 4 were obtained in 1924 and used as training aircrafts. Registration number: B-BLEN...)

Potez XVII-XVIII (France, 6(?) or 30 reconnaissance and training airctafts delivered from France in 1925 or 1926. They were especially built for Bulgaria. Had Lorraine-Dietrich 12Db engine, 400 hp. Registration numbers: B-BPEH, B-BPEM, B-BPEX....)

P.W.S.16bis (Poland, 5 obtained in 1939 (1937?), used as training aircraft)

P.W.S.26 "Yunak" (Poland, 1 biplane trainer P.W.S.26 "Yunak" (hero) obtained in September 1939 when a Polish Air Force example with two pilots fled to Bulgaria via Romania following the collapse of the Polish Government)

P.Z.L. P.24B "Yastreb" (Poland, 12 or 14 P.24B "Yastreb" (hawk) gull-winged monoplane fighters ordered in 1937 and delivered early in 1938. Had 930 hp Gnome-Rhone 14Kfs engine. Used for the fighter role. Majority of aircraft reportedly grounded for lack of spares by mid-1940. Withdrawn from service in 1941)

P.Z.L. P.24C "Yastreb" (Poland, 20 ordered in 1938 and delivered by the end of 1938. Had 930 hp Gnome-Rhone 14Kfs engine. Used for the fighter role. Majority of aircraft reportedly grounded for lack of spares by mid-1940. Withdrawn from service in 1941) But probably, never delivered to Bulgaria.

P.Z.L. P.24F "Yastreb" (Poland, 26 P.24F ordered in 1938. 22 aircrafts delivered by July 1939. Remaining 4 aircrafts delayed at factory awaiting French propellers and damaged in Luftwaffe attacks on Poland in early September 1939 - not delivered? Had 970 hp Gnome-Rhone 14N07 engine. Used for the fighter role. Majority of aircraft reportedly grounded for lack of spares by mid-1940. Withdrawn from service in 1942) But probably, never delivered to Bulgaria.

P.Z.L. P.43A "Chayka" (Poland, 12 P.43A "Chayka" (gull) delivered from late 1937. Developed version of the P.43B with longer fuselage and 930 hp Gnome-Rhone 14Kfs engine. Used by 1st Orliak (Air Regiment) for the light bomber/reconnaissance role)

P.Z.L. P.43B "Chayka" (Poland, 36+6 P.43B ordered in 1938. Variant of the P.43A with 970 hp Gnome-Rhone 14N01 engine, specially built for Bulgaria. 21 aircrafts delivered in March-April 1939, 12 more delivered May-August 1939, remaining 9 aircrafts were planned for delivery in late August 1939 but taken over by Polish Air Force for use against the German attack. One of these nine aircraft was later evaluated by the Luftwaffe and then delivered to Bulgaria after overhaul. The other eight had been delivered in the meantime. Used for the light bomber/reconnaissance role. Military registration number for P.43A, B - 7139)

Also in Bulgaria were built several gliders, for example: type "Zdravka" (1926, two gliders - "Maior Vekilski" and "Porutchik Topraktchiev"); "Polkovnik Drangov" (1930, glider-biplane, constructed by Tsvetan Lazarov ); "Rilski Orel" (1935, two gliders were built, one received Gold medal in the Berlin Olympics in 1936!).

The photos are from http://www.geocities.com/bulgarian_aviation/

Bulgarian light auxiliary and reconnaissance airplane DAR-3 "Garvan-III" (1939, 12 copies)
with armament 1 x 7.92mm synchronized MG for the pilot + 1 MG for the observer + bombs up to 200 kg
Image
The colour camouflage picture of DAR-3 "Garvan-III" - http://www.geocities.com/bulgarian_avia ... rvan3r.jpg


Bulgarian light bomber and reconnaissance airplane KB-5 "Tchutchuliga-III" (1939-1940, 45 copies)
with armament 1 x 7.7mm F-33 MG for the pilot + 1 x 7.7mm FK-36 MG for the observer + 8 x 25 kg bombs
Image
The colour camouflage picture of KB-5 "Tchutchuliga-III" - http://www.airwar.ru/image/idop/spyww2/kb4/kb4-c1.jpg
Last edited by BIGpanzer on 06 Jan 2006 12:49, edited 52 times in total.

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BIGpanzer
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Postby BIGpanzer » 05 Jan 2005 17:51

The full (or almost full) list of the Bulgarian aircrafts (1920-1939) I will try to finish soon, not so easy. Please, enjoy!!! :P :) :)

The info about organization of Bulgarian Air Force of interwar period: http://www.aeroflight.co.uk/waf/bulgari ... _units.htm

An excellent site about Bulgarian aviation: http://www.geocities.com/bulgarian_avia ... glish1.htm
Last edited by BIGpanzer on 08 Oct 2005 16:13, edited 2 times in total.


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