Axis History Forum

This is an apolitical forum for discussions on the Axis nations and related topics hosted by Marcus Wendel's Axis History Factbook in cooperation with Michael Miller's Axis Biographical Research, Christoph Awender's WW2 day by dayand Christian Ankerstjerne’s Panzerworld.

Skip to content

If you found the forum useful please consider supporting us. You can also support us by buying books through the AHF Bookstore.

Japanese War Crimes

Discussions on the Holocaust and 20th Century War Crimes. Note that Holocaust denial is not allowed.
Hosted by David Thompson.

Re: Japanese War Crimes

Postby Peter H on 15 Jan 2009 11:14

Thanks Bill,for your poignant,but relevant,family history.

Peter
User avatar
Peter H
Forum Staff
Australia
 
Posts: 28605
Joined: 30 Dec 2002 13:18
Location: Australia

Re: Japanese War Crimes

Postby Sewer King on 26 Jan 2009 05:37

The JALUIT ATOLL Case in which three US airmen were executed and cremated at the Japanese naval garrison there in March 1944. The senior commander Rear Admiral Nisuke Masuda, three officers and a warrant officer were accused of their murder in late 1945. Masuda committed suicide before trial but three of the others were found guilty and hanged, while the fourth received ten years' imprisonment.

This case was comparable to other war crimes, though less infamous and probably less remembered for it. The defense plea of "superior orders" was invoked but the trial rules were those as applied under Occupation command in Japan. Similar defense was argued at other, more well-known trials, and at the 1947 Guam trials of Japanese officers for murder of other US prisoners-of-war held in the Bonin Islands. Like Admiral Masuda, an IJN lieutenant sought in connection with that latter trial also committed suicide before he could be questioned.

One particular difference for me is the suicide note that Admiral Masuda left in which he took responsibility for ordering the executions. It was read into the trial proceedings, though I would like to read it in entirety. Masuda may have claimed responsibility as commander, but I have not yet seen why he ordered the PoWs executed. Reportedly the US Strategic Bombing Survey also quoted his dying statement that troops under his careful administration at Jaluit had not starved, as did other Imperial garrisons elsewhere in Micronesia. This kind of paradox seems to come across in some Japanese officers connected to various of the Pacific war crimes, which they had abetted by action or omission.

-- Alan
User avatar
Sewer King
Member
United States
 
Posts: 1691
Joined: 18 Feb 2004 04:35
Location: northern Virginia

Re: Japanese War Crimes

Postby Peter H on 28 Jan 2009 01:26

"The butchered bodies of New Guinea"

GRAPHIC
http://www.warbirdforum.com/cannibal.htm
User avatar
Peter H
Forum Staff
Australia
 
Posts: 28605
Joined: 30 Dec 2002 13:18
Location: Australia

Re: Japanese War Crimes

Postby Peter H on 06 Feb 2009 05:43

Laha,Ambon,February 1942:

http://www.geocities.com/dutcheastindie ... sacre.html

http://www.ww2australia.gov.au/japadvance/laha.html

Four Japanese servicemen were executed for war crimes committed on Ambon. Commander Hatakeyama Kunito, the officer who commanded the execution parties, was convicted and hanged but Rear Admiral Hatakeyama Koichiro, who ordered the massacre, died before his trial.
User avatar
Peter H
Forum Staff
Australia
 
Posts: 28605
Joined: 30 Dec 2002 13:18
Location: Australia

Re: Japanese War Crimes

Postby Peter H on 06 Feb 2009 05:45

More..

http://www.cofepow.org.uk/pages/asia_ambon1.htm

Acording to Kamamoto he and his said three companions did not arrive at the scene of the executions until about 1900 hrs by which time it was almost dark. Several bonfires had been lit and cast dancing shadows on a spectacle reminiscent from the pits of Hell. A large group of Dutch and Australian prisoners of war, all with their their arms and hands securely bound behind them and heavily guarded stood waiting in the shadows to be executed.

The punishment site was situated in the same wooded area where the first mass execution of POW s at Laha had been earlier carried out. Kanamoto states that there were two large holes of similar dimension and situated about five metres apart, hereinafter referred to as grave 'A' and grave 'B'.

Grave 'A' was encircled by about thirty marines many of whom were carrying borrowed swords. Among them Kanamoto perceived one officer and a couple of NCOs whose names he could not recall. He was able to state positivcly that no soldiers or marines stood around grave 'B'.

Kanamoto then provided a harrowing description of what followed. He recalls witnessing the beheading of a young prisoner who shouted desperately and despairingly before being decapitated on the nearest side of grave 'A', followed seconds later by the beheading of another prisoner on the opposite side of the said grave. The flickering light from nearby bonfires was insufficient to properly illuminate the carrying out of the punishments (executions), consequently battery torches were produced and used to light the necks of each victim.

After about twenty decapitations, curiosity impelled Kanamoto to step forward and peer into grave 'A'. Some corpses were headless but several bodies with heads half-attached were .jerking feebly and making faint gurgling moans. Kanamoto avers that a feeling of revulsion mixed with pity swept over him, but he could not interfere in the punishments that had been ordered by the Japanese High Command in the area.

A little time later and with about forty executions carried out, subordinate 1st Class Seaman Nakamura borrowed Kanamoto's sword following which he beheaded four Dutch in quick succession on the nearest side of grave 'A' . A short time later 1st Class Seaman Ikezawa took Kanamoto's sword and similarly beheaded three more prisoners, this time Australians. According to Kanamoto, Ikezawa then passed his sword to another subordinate (name not recalled) to behead more prisoners on the far side of grave 'A'.

Two further decapitations were successful, but the third attempt required two sword strokes, a strange sound and sparks concluded the sword's use. Kanamoto claims that he then recovered his sword which, upon inspection by torchlight, was found to be nicked at several places and slightly bent.

After watching a dozen more beheadings and feeling somewhat uncomfortable witnessing such mass butchery, Kanamoto avers that the constant shouts of jubilation from watching marines mixed with ribald scorn as some prisoners begged for their lives. became too much for him...


Ambon was the biggest mass killing of Australians in 1942--229 executed.

Other massacres in 1942--approximately 150 Australians were killed at Tol on New Britain,150 were killed at the 2/13th Australian General Hospital at Singapore,and 110 killed at Parit Sulong,Malaya.
User avatar
Peter H
Forum Staff
Australia
 
Posts: 28605
Joined: 30 Dec 2002 13:18
Location: Australia

Re: Japanese War Crimes

Postby Peter H on 06 Feb 2009 12:37

The seven Australian Hutchins brothers,four died as POWs of the Japanese:

Pte Fred Hutchins died on 6 July 1945, Pte David Hutchins on the 29 July 1945, Pte Eric Hutchins on 20 February 1942,all 2/21st Battalion(Gulf Force).

Pte Alan Leslie Hutchins, 2/22nd Battalion (Lark Force), died as a POW on the 31 March 1942 at Rabaul, New Britain.

Pte Ivan Robert Hutchins, 2/4th Field Ambulance, Bombardier Malcolm George 'Mike' Hutchins, 156th Light Anti Aircraft Battery, and Pte William Ernest Hutchins, 2/22nd Battalion (later 2/23rd Battalion), survived the war and returned to Australia.They had served in the Middle East and New Guinea.

Another cousin ,taken as a prisoner by the Japanese,Pte Thomas Hutchins,2/21st Battalion,died on the 4 September 1945.

Composite photo of the Hutchins boys made by their parents after the war.From the AWM:

L to R Back-David,Malcolm,Eric,Fred,William and Ivan.Alan sitting between parents.

More here: http://sevensoldiersons.org.au/
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
User avatar
Peter H
Forum Staff
Australia
 
Posts: 28605
Joined: 30 Dec 2002 13:18
Location: Australia

Re: Japanese War Crimes

Postby Peter H on 16 Feb 2009 07:32

Buna Massacre August 1942

http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2002/08/ ... 13113.html

This was never more true of eight civilians, among them two women and a six-year-old boy, captured by invading Japanese troops in Papua in the last week of July 1942. What happened to this small group is told, in all its grimness, in Retreat from Kokoda, the celebrated account of the Kokoda campaign written by ABC war correspondent Raymond Paull and acknowledged as "a classic military history" by The Oxford Companion to Australian Literature. Paull died in 1972. His book was published in 1958. In it he wrote of the missionary group:

"The rapid [Japanese] advance inland trapped many of the Europeans at the hospitals, missions and plantations on the Buna coast [of east Papua]. Few succeeded in eluding the enemy and crossing the [Owen Stanley] mountains to the south coast. Lieut Louis Austin and an Anglican mission party travelling from Ioma to Tufi were betrayed to the Japanese by the natives of Perembata village. [The group consisted of] Miss Margaret Branchley, Miss Lillian Lashman, the Rev Henry Holland, the Rev Vivian Hedlich, Mr John Duffill, two half-caste mission workers, Louise Artango and Anthony Gore, and Gore's six-year-old son.

"At Buna, on 12th August, 1942, outside the headquarters of the Sasebo No 5 Special Naval Landing Party, the entire group was beheaded one by one with the sword, the boy last of all. The self-appointed executioner of the Christian mission workers was Sub-Lieut Komai, a company commander. Komai was identified also as the 'Bushido' executioner of Flight-Lieutenant William Ellis Newton, VC, at Salamaua [in Papua] on 29th March, 1943. An Australian War Crimes investigation team traced Komai to the point where his death was established beyond doubt. The natives responsible for the betrayal of the mission party were hanged."
User avatar
Peter H
Forum Staff
Australia
 
Posts: 28605
Joined: 30 Dec 2002 13:18
Location: Australia

Re: Japanese War Crimes

Postby Peter H on 16 Feb 2009 07:46

Gona missionaries 1942

http://www.smh.com.au/news/opinion/last ... 99696.html

The shadow of enemy activity, looming towards the few miles of swampy [Papuan] coastline, fell upon a handful of civilians still engaged in normal peacetime occupations. Some, like the Reverend James Benson, Miss May Hayman and Miss Mavis Parkinson at the Anglican Gona Mission, stayed from a strong sense of Christian duty, with some foreboding perhaps but without fear…"

Later, after the invasion and the beheading of the Buna group, Paull recounted: "A traitorous guide betrayed Miss Hayman and Miss Parkinson from the Gona Mission [along the coast from Buna]. After a night under guard at Popondetta, the Japanese took the two women to a spot where graves had been dug and repeatedly bayoneted them. Their bodies, recovered some months later, received Christian burial at Sangara Mission. Father Benson alone survived captivity."



According to Peter Fitzsimons in Kokoda their location was betrayed to the Japanese by a village councillor named Embogi:

In September 1943..native policemen and ANGAU officers gathered the villagers of Higaturu together so they could witness..the hanging of seventeen men,including the original traitor Embogi..and as a large group of village women and men wailed,the job was done..


From: http://anglicanhistory.org/aus/png/bell_ruins1946.html

Image

Image
User avatar
Peter H
Forum Staff
Australia
 
Posts: 28605
Joined: 30 Dec 2002 13:18
Location: Australia

Re: Japanese War Crimes

Postby David Thompson on 21 Feb 2009 01:25

Peter H -- Do you have any information about the unit(s) involved in those killings and their commander? It's horrible to read about this sort of thing without knowing who was to blame and what happened to him/them.

For the execution of native New Guineans as accomplices and perpetrators, see http://www.pngaa.net/Books/Recollections_of_ANGAU.htm .
David Thompson
Forum Staff
United States
 
Posts: 22010
Joined: 20 Jul 2002 19:52
Location: USA

Re: Japanese War Crimes

Postby Peter H on 21 Feb 2009 02:19

David

Marines of the SNLF 5th Sasebo were involved in both cases,part of the Nankai Shitai (South Seas Detachment) ( viewtopic.php?t=81839 ).

The initial landing force at Buna was the "Yokoyama Force consisted of the 15th Engineers,the 47th Field Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion, the 1/144th Regiment of the Nankai Shitai,and a company of the SNLF 5th Sasebo".However the killing of the women happened on the 13th August 1942,when only 430 men of the SNLF 5th Sasebo(having landed in Late July) were the only troops there. ( http://ajrp.awm.gov.au/ajrp/AJRP2.nsf/0 ... ent#con1.3 )


As Paul Ham relates in Kokoda,page 64:

'Mavis was the first to die',wrote Dr Tony Matthews.'A Japanese soldier grasped her from behind and attempted to embrace her:she struggled,almost managed to break free,but the soldier took a step backwards and plunged his bayonet deep into her side.She screamed and sank to the ground.May was ordered to cover her face with a towel;as she was doing so she was bayonted in the throat'....many Japanese troops witnessed these events..yet no war Crimes Tribunal punished the perpetrators..One reason is that those responsible were part of the unusually brutual Sasebo 5 Special Naval Landing led by Tsukioka Torashigo,most of whose troops later died in the Pacific War,making identification of the culprits difficult..


The SNLF 5th Sasebo later landed at Milne Bay in August 1942,a battle also known for its atrocities,as already mentioned in this topic.They were effectively 'gutted' by the Australian defenders there so few survived the war.


Peter
User avatar
Peter H
Forum Staff
Australia
 
Posts: 28605
Joined: 30 Dec 2002 13:18
Location: Australia

Re: Japanese War Crimes

Postby David Thompson on 21 Feb 2009 02:45

Thanks, Peter H. I appreciate the additional information, and I'm sure our readers do too.
David Thompson
Forum Staff
United States
 
Posts: 22010
Joined: 20 Jul 2002 19:52
Location: USA

Re: Japanese War Crimes

Postby Peter H on 24 Feb 2009 08:30

From JapanToday,6th December 2008:

Imperial Japanese Navy slaughtered leprosy victims in 1943: documents

TOKYO, Dec. 6 (AP) - (Kyodo)—The former Imperial Japanese Navy slaughtered 39 Hansen's disease sufferers in Nauru in the Micronesian South Pacific in July 1943 according to court documents found by a Japanese scholar last month in the National Archives of Australia and the Australian War Memorial.

It appears that the documents discovered by Hirofumi Hayashi, professor of modern history at Kanto Gakuin University, are the first public documents that disclose details of the killings during World War II, although they had been mentioned by local residents and others.

The Republic of Nauru, an island nation in the South Pacific that Japan seized in 1942, established independence in 1968 with a population of about 10,000.

The documents concerning the trials of Class B and C war criminals include the record of the court testimony by a soldier who was involved in the killings and was later sentenced to life in prison. The documents shed light on discrimination against sufferers from leprosy as well as war crimes against civilians.

According to the documents from the trial, held in Hong Kong from Nov. 29 to Dec. 3, 1948, a leader of the Sea Defense Branch of the navy, who was executed on a separate charge, ordered one of his subordinate officers around July 9, 1943, to kill the Hansen's disease victims, who were quarantined due to the disease, to prevent them from escaping during possible air raids by U.S. forces.

The officer concocted a plan, telling the people that they were going to be transferred to a newly built facility by boat.

Four navy personnel and eight civilian employees boarded a naval vessel and led a boat carrying the victims offshore, and then opened fire on the boat and sank it. They shot and killed those who managed to escape from the sunken ship.

Most of the 12 personnel involved in the killings died in battle during the war, but three were brought to trial, two of whom were sentenced to life in prison.

The victims, 24 men and 15 women, were aged between 11 and 69.

The Australian government, which once ruled the area, earlier conducted an investigation based on testimonies from local residents but was unsuccessful in discovering how much senior-level officers of the former Japanese military knew about the killings.
User avatar
Peter H
Forum Staff
Australia
 
Posts: 28605
Joined: 30 Dec 2002 13:18
Location: Australia

Re: Japanese War Crimes

Postby Peter H on 27 Feb 2009 00:50

Fighting the Enemy,Mark Johnston,page 99:


Sattleberg in November 1943...'The singing out we heard yesterday was coming from one of our chaps who was wounded,he had been laying out all night,the Japs[sic] kicked him,slashed his face with a knife and left him for dead'...in describing the same incident [its] said that up to ten wounded Australians were bashed and killed.


In March 1945,a signalman on Bougainville reported that Australian provosts caught in a jeep by the Japanese had been tied to their vehicle and set alight.
User avatar
Peter H
Forum Staff
Australia
 
Posts: 28605
Joined: 30 Dec 2002 13:18
Location: Australia

Re: Japanese War Crimes

Postby Peter H on 02 Mar 2009 08:12

Yala incident 12th December 1941

From Australia's Forgotten Prisoners,Christina Twomey.

On the 8th December 1941 Japanese forces entered Thailand..."within three days local Siamese police..had herded together the twenty-seven whites living in the area.." of Yala.These were the European managers(and their families) of the tin-mining company at Yala.They included British,Australian and Swiss.

The entire group was housed in a small mine bungalow intended to accomodate two people...the following evening the sleeping occupants of the bungalow were awken by the blasts of hand grenades.Japanese guards then entered the chaos,dragged out some Indian prisoners who had recently joined the group and executed them.Another guard climbed underneath the raised bungalow and sprayed bullets up through the floor.When he had finished,other Japanese guards procedded to shoot and bayonet those whom they thought still alive.Believing their work finished,the guards left the bungalow and drove away in trucks.Those who had survived,by pretending to be dead,fled into the nearby jungle.


At least a dozen European civilians died..the rest wandered off into the jungle until interned and sent to Changhi.However one Australian was "later murdered while he slept by a party of armed Siamese in sympathy with the Japanese cause".


Another Australian working in Bangkok,Geoffrey Scott-Settle,was arrested by the Thais as a spy and handled over to the Kempetai:

This resulted in a four month detention in a prison in southern Siam,where Scott-Settle's ribs and all his fingers were broken.He was confirmed to a cage and received more than 200 bayonet wounds.In an act of astonishing cruelty,a sword was inserted in his arm at the elbow and pushed beneath his skin until it emerged at his shoulder.The sword remained lodged in his arm for four days.Despite such torture ,Scott-Settle's life was spared and ultimately he was transferred to Changi prison.
User avatar
Peter H
Forum Staff
Australia
 
Posts: 28605
Joined: 30 Dec 2002 13:18
Location: Australia

Re: Japanese War Crimes

Postby Arek on 03 Mar 2009 22:11

Please excuse me if I repeat question about Japanese atrocities comitted in China from 7 July 1937 to siege of Nankin 13 december 1937. I haven`t found a topic related to that matter.

I would really appreciate for help.
User avatar
Arek
Member
Poland
 
Posts: 31
Joined: 19 Dec 2004 16:48
Location: Poland

PreviousNext

Return to Holocaust & 20th Century War Crimes

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot], emil d. kjerte, Hecht, Renner aus Schlesien and 2 guests