Need ID Chinese artillery

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YC Chen
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Re: Need ID Chinese artillery

Post by YC Chen » 31 Oct 2013 14:10

tomschen6645 wrote:These photos just the N4A arsenal of products in 1943 or 1944.
Yes, it's highly possible that the caption is incorrect and some of these are in fact N4A's own products.

BTW, the book "安徽省军事工业志" contains detailed information on knee mortars, little mortars and infantry guns produced by N4A's arsenals(unfortunately no photos). Worth refrencing if anyone is interested.

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ain92
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Re: Need ID Chinese artillery

Post by ain92 » 01 Feb 2014 15:27

Hello all,
I found today two interesting photos on Wikimedia Commons, both made in 1911 in Wuhan.
Image
The first gun seem to be a 1890s semi-QF (with resilient spade) Krupp mountain one.
Image
The second image (clickable) shows a 1900s QF Krupp field gun, probably 7.5 cm L/30.
Can anybody help with their Chinese designation?
With best regards, Ilya.

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Re: Need ID Chinese artillery

Post by YC Chen » 04 Feb 2014 16:42

Ah, two well-known photos of Chinese artillery in 1911.

The first one, Gruson 57mm QF gun(most probably copy from Hanyang arsenal), in Chinese, 格鲁森五七(五生的七, which means 5.7cm)过山快炮.

The second one, 7.5cm Krupp field gun - the type selected by Imperial Chinese government was L/29. In Chinese, 克虏伯(or simply 克式)二十九倍七五野炮. For more detailed info on Chinese Krupp 7.5cm guns see here: http://63528.activeboard.com/t51281329/ ... ns/?page=3 (also the previous page). I am the "kkfj1" on Landships Forum. :wink:

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Re: Need ID Chinese artillery

Post by Sturm78 » 04 Apr 2014 14:21

Hi all,

Any idea about this coastal gun?
It seems that these soldiers are loading this gun....with the barrel blown !! :? 8O

Image from EBay
Sturm78
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Stephen_Rynerson
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Re: Need ID Chinese artillery

Post by Stephen_Rynerson » 05 Apr 2014 02:39

Sturm78 wrote:Hi all,

Any idea about this coastal gun?
It seems that these soldiers are loading this gun....with the barrel blown !! :? 8O

Image from EBay
Sturm78
I'm pretty sure that's a gun at the Wusong Fort on the coast outside of Shanghai. If I'm correct about that, the picture is presumably taken during the Shanghai Incident in 1932.

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Re: Need ID Chinese artillery

Post by YC Chen » 05 Apr 2014 05:46

Stephen's ID is correct. This is a 4.7in QF gun in Woosung Battery. One possibility is that this gun was a copy made in Kiangnan Arsenal, another is that this is one of the guns salvaged from Chinese crusier "Hai Tian". My unproven theory is that this gun is a hybrid of these two - British-made barrel on Shanghai-made carriage.

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Re: Need ID Chinese artillery

Post by Sturm78 » 06 Apr 2014 18:47

Thank you, Stephen and YC Chen

Regards Sturm78

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Re: Need ID Chinese artillery

Post by YC Chen » 13 May 2014 14:14

Hello all,

Take a look at this rare item appeared on a Chinese online bookstore: http://book.kongfz.com/4581/220690594/
(for larger photos: http://book.kongfz.com/item_pic_4581_220690594/)

This seems to be a Krupp category book for a certain "Zerlegbare 7.5cm Feldkannon" for selling to China. I have never seen this kind of gun before(or, more accurately, I can't remember seeing this kind of gun before :D ). However, I think this gun is very similar in configuration to the Jin made 10.5cm Type 16 mountain gun. I'm not really sure when this thing is printed(the seller claim it was printed in 1936).

Any ideas?

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Re: Need ID Chinese artillery

Post by nuyt » 20 May 2014 21:32

Definitely a pre WW1 model with a lot of characteristics of Krupp mountain guns of the period. Nevertheless it appears to be called a field gun.
Cant find it in Kosar's mountain guns book.

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Re: Need ID Chinese artillery

Post by YC Chen » 23 May 2014 12:05

Thanks a lot for your reply. I also thought that it has many pre-WW1 features, and that was why I thought this thing must be earlier (perhaps much earlier) than 1936, most probably an item from Warlord Era.

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ain92
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Re: Need ID Chinese artillery

Post by ain92 » 29 Sep 2014 17:35

Hello again.
Here're some more photos of late 19th-century Chinese artillery of German origin from Commons:
  1. A German-produced light field gun dated 1896 from the former Tai Po Police station in Hong Kong, the Police Museum states the calibre is 7.5 cm.
    ImageImage
  2. Two Krupp-ish coastal guns on their carriages at the Guangzhou Museum.
    Image
  3. A heavy coastal gun with Krupp-ish breech-block at Weiyuan Fort near Dongguan in 1923 and 2006.
    Image
    Image
  4. A German-produced light coastal (or naval) gun dated 1891 at the Guangxi Museum.
    Image
Thanks in advance.
With best regards, Ilya.

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Re: Need ID Chinese artillery

Post by forttravel » 03 Nov 2014 17:02

I found also Chinesse translation for practice of Krupp guns add ammo, it is from Austrian National Library sources.
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Re: Need ID Chinese artillery

Post by YC Chen » 25 Nov 2014 17:28

YC Chen wrote:Hello all,

Take a look at this rare item appeared on a Chinese online bookstore: http://book.kongfz.com/4581/220690594/
(for larger photos: http://book.kongfz.com/item_pic_4581_220690594/)

This seems to be a Krupp category book for a certain "Zerlegbare 7.5cm Feldkannon" for selling to China. I have never seen this kind of gun before(or, more accurately, I can't remember seeing this kind of gun before :D ). However, I think this gun is very similar in configuration to the Jin made 10.5cm Type 16 mountain gun. I'm not really sure when this thing is printed(the seller claim it was printed in 1936).

Any ideas?
Could it be a derivative of the late-WW1 German infantry guns introduced here? http://www.landships.info/landships/art ... tives.html#

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Re: Need ID Chinese artillery

Post by YC Chen » 25 Dec 2014 08:20

Found this quite interesting video on the Internet: the disposal of bombs and artillery ammunitions unearthed in the city of Jinan this November. Quite a lot of shells for old field/mountain guns and mortars, and an unearthed aerial bomb as well 8O :

http://v.iqilu.com/ggpd/msztc/2014/1113/4146905.html

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Re: Need ID Chinese artillery

Post by YC Chen » 14 Nov 2016 04:19

Hello all,

Have just won this photo on a Chinese auction site.

Have Never seen such a gun and have definitely no information about it. It seems that the gun had a barrel that could be dissembled into two parts, very much like the "screw guns" - mountain guns developed by the British in late 19th century. However it is not a rigid-mount gun.

The only Chinese gun I know with a two-part barrel was developed by Hanyang Arsenal in 1910s(if I remember correctly) and was based on the Krupp field gun. I have only seen this mentioned in a document as several prototypes were built, and nothing more.

Any clues on this one?
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