Khabarovsk Protocol 1929

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GregSingh
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Khabarovsk Protocol 1929

Post by GregSingh » 16 Feb 2016 04:25

Here is a text of the Protocol I came across in 1931 German railroad publication. Good thing - it's in English!
Khabarovsk Protocol - part 1.jpg
Khabarovsk Protocol - part 2.jpg
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If we become increasingly humble about how little we know, we may be more eager to search.

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The 51st Division
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Re: Khabarovsk Protocol 1929

Post by The 51st Division » 27 Apr 2016 01:08

The 1929 Sino-Soviet border clash over control of railways? It's called the "Zhongdonglu Incident" or "CER Incident" in China (CER for 中东路, Chinese Eastern Railway). The Russians go by something like "Far East Conflict."
When it comes to Manchuria and the Russian Far East, the names become the ultimate pain in the XXX. Both the Russians and the Chinese have completely different names for completely everything. For example, even today Chinese still refer to Khabarovsk by its original Chinese name "Boli," and the Khabarovsk Protocol (from the Russian name "Хабаровский протокол") is called the "Boli Conference Resolution" or "Boli Protocol" by Chinese scholars.

Anyway, awesome to have this primary source, thank you Greg. :milsmile:
"The nation might be powerful, yet it shall be destroyed if it seeks war; the world might be peaceful, yet it shall be doomed if it forgets war."
--The Method of the Sima, Qin Dynasty Chinese Military Classic

sarhang
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Re: Khabarovsk Protocol 1929

Post by sarhang » 03 May 2016 05:33

The 51st Division wrote:The 1929 Sino-Soviet border clash over control of railways? ... The Russians go by something like "Far East Conflict."
The Russians call it "Conflict on the CER"
The 51st Division wrote: even today Chinese still refer to Khabarovsk by its original Chinese name "Boli,"
This should not mislead us into believing that Boli was the original name of Khabarovsk. Indeed, the Aigun Treaty of 1858 which is sometimes quoted as an example of the unequal treaties imposed on the Chinese, was, so to say, equal on both sides, as the Chinese (in fact, Manchu) presence on the Amur was due to an expansionism that matched any other.

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