1940 Incident at Kanze

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Stephen_Rynerson
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1940 Incident at Kanze

Post by Stephen_Rynerson » 08 Jan 2017 06:36

I'm looking for more details about an incident that took place at Kanze (Ganzi) in 1940. While researching something else, I ran across an account in a 1941 issue of the journal Asia of the palace of the princess of Kanze being seized during "the early months of 1940" by what the author merely described as "belligerents," who were in turn besieged in the palace by some other (unspecified) force before surrendering due to lack of water. From the context of the piece, I think the "belligerents" who seized the palace were troops belonging to Liu Wenhui and that the force which in turn besieged them were Tibetan troops of some sort. However, the article is vague enough that my reading of it could be wrong. Any additional information that someone might have would be appreciated.

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The 51st Division
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Re: 1940 Incident at Kanze

Post by The 51st Division » 08 Jan 2017 22:06

Here's some information about the Ganzi Incident (or Kanze Incident, or Garzê Incident, or whatever transliteration method people use...)

First you need to know, the history of Han-Tibetan relations in the 20th Century is a GIGANTIC MESS. I am not Tibetan and knows close to nothing about the details of all this business, so I'll only try to give you a VERY general account...

The Ganzi Incident erupted in 1939 between Khampa Tibetans and Han Chinese in Xikang (Sikang, or "West Kham") Province (today's western Sichuan Province). The background is that the 9th Panchen Lama, because of squabbles with the 13th Dalai Lama, left Kham for inland China in the early 1930s, and for VARIOUS REASONS decided to align with the Chinese KMT government. In 1934 the KMT government, for VARIOUS REASONS agreed to send Panchen back to Kham, and organized an elite KMT-standard 100-men Panchen Xing Yuan (班禅行辕) security force made up of Tibetan soldiers to escort him along the way. For VARIOUS REASONS the Tibetan Kashag government refused to let the escort enter, and Panchen died in 1937. After Panchen's death, the KMT government ordered the Xing Yuan security force to bring the coffin to the county of Ganzi. Liu Wenhui (刘文辉), Sichuan warlord and commander of the NRA 24th Corps (or 24th Army as older English sources may call it), basically wanted to seize the Xing Yuan's elite equipment, and confrontation eventually escalated into a tiny war in 1939 between his 24th Corps and the Xing Yuan, which had allied with the local Tusi (土司) in Ganzi called Kongsa Deqinwangmu (孔萨·德钦旺姆, this is her transliterated Chinese name, I could not find the original Tibetan name, since she's the only female character involved in this affair I think this might be your "princess") for another reason involving she being forced into an unwanted marriage by Liu Wenhui, who for VARIOUS REASON also happens to be her adoptive father.

And then it sorta turned into a little Kham Tibetan uprising against Chinese warlord forces, but also not really since the Xing Yuan was directly funded by the Chinese KMT government... so yeah it's a mess.

Ultimately Liu Wenhui's warlord 24th Corps won, and the KMT government disbanded the Panchen Xing Yuan in 1941. But the female Tusi Deqinwangmu and her true lover Yixiduoji (益西多吉) from the Xing Yuan security forces managed to run away and live happily ever after (sort of), so I guess it's not toooo bad?

This whole thing could be made into a pretty darn good Disney princess movie.
"The nation might be powerful, yet it shall be destroyed if it seeks war; the world might be peaceful, yet it shall be doomed if it forgets war."
--The Method of the Sima, Qin Dynasty Chinese Military Classic

Stephen_Rynerson
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Joined: 07 Jul 2013 05:08

Re: 1940 Incident at Kanze

Post by Stephen_Rynerson » 09 Jan 2017 05:12

Thank you, The 51st Division! This gives some helpful context.

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