'Rays of the Rising Sun:China and Manchukuo' by Philip Jowett

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Hama
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'Rays of the Rising Sun:China and Manchukuo' by Philip Jowett

Post by Hama » 31 Mar 2017 22:40

If anyone here has a copy of this book would you be able to do me a small favour? :)

On page 56 under the heading 'Inner Mongolian Equipment 1936' it apparently mentions the Inner Mongolian Army's use of the SIG Model 1930 submachinegun. Unfortunately I can only see the first sentence in Google Books preview and I don't own it myself. Would anyone be able to summarise for me what it says about this gun in that section?

Thanks!

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wstraka
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Re: 'Rays of the Rising Sun:China and Manchukuo' by Philip Jowett

Post by wstraka » 01 Apr 2017 00:08

Hama,

Here you go,

"The Army was armed with the usual wide variety of rifles, most of which had been bought by Prince Teh Wang or acquired from the Japanese. 10,000 Model 13 Mauser rifles manufactured in the Mukden Arsenal were given to the Inner Mongolians. Other more exotic types of firearms found their way to Inner Mongolia and included the Swiss Sig. Model 1930 sub-machine gun, used in small numbers by bodyguard troops. How this modern model of sub-machine gun which didn't see service with any of the other armies in China found its way to Inner Mongolia is not known. Machine guns used by the Inner Mongolians totalled 200, with some of them being the Czech ZB-26 light machine gun. This type had been in service with the Young Marshal Chang Hsueh-liang's forces and were captured by the Japanese in 1931-32 and handed on to the Inner Mongolians. Artillery pieces in service with the Inner Mongolians totalled 70 and these were made up of mortars as well as a few mountain and field guns. Again these would have come from captured Nationalist sources and would have been a variety of types, with the replenishing of ammunition being a problem. Reportedly, a handful of tanks and armoured cars were in service with the Inner Mongolians. These would have mostly likely been vehicles captured by the Japanese during their takeover of Manchuria and crewed by Japanese."

Hope this helps.

Bill

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Hama
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Re: 'Rays of the Rising Sun:China and Manchukuo' by Philip Jowett

Post by Hama » 01 Apr 2017 01:04

Thanks! That was definitely helpful. :)

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