Guangdong Army OOB

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theltlev
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Posts: 2
Joined: 21 Nov 2020 10:40
Location: Ukraine

Guangdong Army OOB

Post by theltlev » 26 Nov 2020 08:41

Hello there, found a lot of great information here among sources listed-but have been unable to find much on the "Proto-NRA" which existed before August 1925 in Guangdong. Specifically which units joined Chen Jiongming's rebellion, and which stayed loyal?

The numbers in several sources vary wildly, for example the First and Second Eastern Campaigns list Chen Jiongming's force as being 40000, 50000 or even 100000 strong, yet those same forces list his capitol as being defended by 2000-4000 men, and the most that engages KMT forces is 10000

Orders of battle are even more sketchy, with the first campaign listing
1st Whampoa Trainee Regiment (1200+)
2nd Whampoa Trainee Regiment (850+)
Whampoa Artillery, Engineer, Additional units (2000 men)
2nd Guangdong Division,
7th Guangdong Brigade (one english-language source listed it as a division, but I've seen Divisions, Brigades and Corps all been translated as "Army" in various sources
(Total Guangdong forces 6000 men)

The "Dian Army" which eventually becomes the third army is, on the other hand, consistently listed as having 30000 men (Possibly with Liu Zhongnan's Gui Army) in three divisions before trying to take Guangzhou, and 10000 men at the beginning of the campaign, likewise reliable numbers crop up for the second (Formerly Hunan) army (Always listed as 15000, under Tan Yankai)

Has anyone got a good idea of what a Chen Jiongming OOB looks like for the eastern campaigns? as when the margin of error is between 2000-100000 some clarification is required.

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Robert24
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Posts: 66
Joined: 12 Feb 2009 03:28

Re: Guangdong Army OOB

Post by Robert24 » 15 Feb 2021 04:55

Try this site:
http://translate.google.com/translate?h ... rev=search

Let me know how it works for you.

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