Shanghai 1932

Discussions on all aspects of China, from the beginning of the First Sino-Japanese War till the end of the Chinese Civil War. Hosted by YC Chen.
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Peter H
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Re: Shanghai 1932

Post by Peter H » 19 Sep 2010 12:51

Japanese photo.

Brave Chinese defender in death
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Re: Shanghai 1932

Post by Peter H » 19 Sep 2010 12:56

Under arrest
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Re: Shanghai 1932

Post by Peter H » 19 Sep 2010 13:00


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tigre
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Re: Shanghai 1932

Post by tigre » 07 Jan 2015 22:09

Hello to all :D; more follows ....................

Attack of Japanese troops to the North Gate - Shanghai 1932.

Seemingly they were troops of the Kaigun Tokubetsu Rikusentai - Special Naval Landing Forces of IJN...................

Source: L'Illustration 27 Fevrier 1932 Vintage Print of Battle Shanghai Japanese War Soldiers Military 1932.

Can anyone identify these vehicles? TIA. Cheers. Raul M 8-).
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Re: Shanghai 1932

Post by YC Chen » 08 Jan 2015 07:59

British armored car Vickers-Crossley M1923 "Indian pattern", 9 of them were used by Japanese SNLF during the "Shanghai Incident" in 1932. It also appeared again in Shanghai in 1937 and also in Zhoushan Islands in 1938.

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Re: Shanghai 1932

Post by tigre » 08 Jan 2015 14:31

Thank you very much pal :wink:. Saludos. Raúl M 8-).

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Re: Shanghai 1932

Post by tigre » 10 Jan 2015 15:18

Hello to all :D; more follows ....................

Japanese troops (Kaigun Tokubetsu Rikusentai - Special Naval Landing Force IJN) marching through the streets of Chapei, sown with Chinese corpses.....

Source: L’Ilustration 27 Fevrier 1932. Vintage Print of Battle Shanghai Japanese Soldiers Military War 1932

Cheers. Raúl M 8-).
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Re: Shanghai 1932

Post by tigre » 25 Dec 2015 13:49

Hello to all :D; a briefing about an article written about this subject....................

THE SINO- JAPANESE CLASH AT SHANGHAI, 1932.

SHANGHAI.

The city of Shanghai is situated on the Whangpoo River, which flows into the mouth of the Yangtse kiang at Woosung.

The Woosung forts are situated on the north bank of the Whangpoo and the south bank of the Yangtse, and the Shihtzulin forts some five miles further up on the south bank of the Yangtse.

The city of Shanghai, with the greater portion lying on the left bank of the Whangpoo River, is divided into five integral parts:

The Chinese native city and suburbs of Nantao and Lunghwa.
The Chapei-Paoshan area.
Pootung, lying on the right bank.
The International Settlement.
The French Settlement.

These three first comprise the Chinese Municipality of Greater Shanghai.The Chinese native city, which is situated on the south-east corner of Shanghai, is a small, compact, homogeneous area, consisting of tortuous streets and narrow, evil smelling lanes. The Chapei-Paoshan area, situated on the northern side of Shanghai, is a somewhat similar district. The French Settlement comprises an area of about 2,420 acres. The International Settlement lies to the north of the French Settlement, and covers an area of about eight square miles.

Outside the Settlements is a fringe of Chinese habitations merging into flat country, covered with rice fields, creeks and dykes, and in particular the district north of Shanghai, lying to the west of the Whangpoo River, is flat and intersected by innumerable creeks, ditches and dykes. One of the largest of the creeks is the Woosung Creek, or Wentsopang, which joins the Whangpoo at a point just south of Woosung village. At this point it is about 300 yards wide, and is spanned by two wooden bridges, side by side, one of which carries the Shanghai-Woosung railway.

Population.

Greater Shanghai 1,703,574 (Chinese) 9,882 (Foreigners) 1,713,456 (Total).
International Settlement 971,397 (Chinese) 6,221 (British) 30,250 (Others foreigners) 1,007,868 (Total)
French Settlement 421,885 (Chinese) 2,219 (British) 10,116 (Others foreigners) 434,220 (Total)
Grand Total 3,155,544.

Government.

The International Settlement is governed by a Municipal Council consisting of twelve members selected annually by the ratepayers. In I932 the Council was composed of five British, two Americans, two Japanese and three Chinese. Six Chinese are also selected to serve, one on each of the six advisory committees of the Council. The government of the French Settlement is independently carried out by the French, on generally similar lines to that of the International Settlement.

The Policing of Shanghai.

The Chinese parts of the city are policed by the ordinary Chinese policemen, and in certain districts, such as Nantao, there are the public safety guard, who are in reality a form of gendarmerie, working under the Bureau of Public Safety. In the French Concession there are French, Chinese and Annamite police. In the International Settlement the majority of the policemen are Sikhs, with a large proportion of Chinese, with British and Russian sergeants, inspectors and high officials; there are also Japanese and numerous other nationalities.

Foreign Troops in Shanghai.

In normal times, each foreign Power keeps a peace garrison at Shanghai. Their numbers are usually of the following order :

British . . . . 2 battalions of infantry.
United States . . 1 battalion, 4th Marine Corps.
French . . . . 1 battalion.
Japanese . . Naval landing party ashore, approximately 700 strong.
Italian . . . . Naval landing party (150). (Only landed if required.)

In addition to the above forces, there is the Shanghai Volunteer Corps, which totals some 2,000. The Shanghai Volunteer Corps is under the orders of the British commandant. With the exception of the Russian company, the Shanghai Volunteer Corps are unpaid, and only mobilise when required in a state of emergency.

19th Route Army - Reasons for its being at Shangai.

When the Japanese exploded their bombshell on 28th January, the Shanghai area was garrisoned by troops belonging to the Cantonese 19th Route Army. These troops were under the orders of no one but their own commanders. Their sole reason for being in the area at all was that their presence there had been insisted upon by the Cantonese politicians, as a sine quâ non of their attendance at the 4th plenary session of the Kuomintang.

Source: THE NAVAL REVIEW. February 1933.

Cheers. Raúl M 8-).

Feliz Navidad - Feliz Natal - Frohe Weihnachten - Joyeux Noël - Merry Christmas - Wesołych Świąt!. :D
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Re: Shanghai 1932

Post by tigre » 28 Dec 2015 20:27

Hello to all :D; a little more....................

THE SINO- JAPANESE CLASH AT SHANGHAI, 1932.

Chain of incidents that led to the clash.

On 18th January, 1932 five Japanese, including two priests, were assaulted by a Chinese mob just outside the boundary of the International Settlement, two of the party being seriously injured. On 20th January, an armed gang of some forty Japanese retaliated by burning down the Chinese factory whose workmen were alleged to have been responsible for the assault. Returning to the Settlement, these Japanese came into conflict with the municipal police, one Chinese constable being seriously injured and another stabbed to death, while one of the Japanese was shot and subsequently died. On 21st January a Japanese mob rioted and demonstrated in the Settlement.

A set of four " demands " were, however, presented by the Japanese to the Chinese authorities of Greater Shanghai, in connection with the assault on the Japanese priests. These demands were:

(i) An official apology.
(ii) Punishment of assailants.
(iii) Compensation.
(iv) The suppression of all anti-Japanese organisations.

At the same time Japanese naval reinforcements, consisting of destroyers and cruisers, with the seaplane tender Notoro, arrived at Shanghai, and the Japanese authorities let it be known that drastic action would be taken if their demands were not complied with.

On 23 January the Japanese Naval Forces in Shangai were:

Cruisers: Hirado and Oi.
Mining Vessel: Tokiwa.
Destroyers: Urakaze, Hagi, Fuji, Susuki, Tsuta.
Gunboats: Ataka, Katata.
Seaplane tender Notoro.

Rear-Admiral Shiozawa, flying his flag in the gunboat Ataka, held a position corresponding to the British Rear-Admiral, Yangtse. At the time he was at Shanghai, and senior Japanese naval officer present, and as the Japanese peace time garrison at Shanghai consisted of a naval landing party, Admiral Shiozawa was therefore in complete control of the forces present. The naval landing party was under the command of Captain Baron Samejima.

On 26th January the Nanking government ordered compliance with all the Japanese demands, and it looked as if the crisis was over.

On 27th January, the Japanese Consul-General, Mr. Murai, delivered an ultimatum to the mayor of Greater Shanghai, demanding complete compliance with the Japanese demands before the following evening, failing which the Japanese Navy would take appropriate steps to enforce them.

On this day the foreign men-of-war at Shanghai were :
BRITISH: Cornwall (Senior Naval Officer), Sandwich and three Yangtse gunboats, one refitting.
FRENCH: Altair, Craonne and Tahure.
ITALIAN: Libia and Sebastiano Caboto.
JAPANESE: Ataka, Hirado, Oi and five destroyers.
U.S.A.: Panay and Truxton.
The Commander-in-Chief, in Kent, was at Batavia, and Suffolk, Berwick and Cumberland at Hong Kong, the latter refitting.

A Shanghai Defence Committee meeting was called, and plans were made for putting into effect a State of Emergency, should this become necessary. At this meeting the Japanese representative stated that he thought he would be able to give 24 hours' notice of any definite action to be taken by their forces.

Source: THE NAVAL REVIEW. February 1933.

Cheers. Raúl M 8-).

Feliz Año Nuevo - Happy New Year - feliz Ano Novo - gluckliches Neues Jahr - Bonne Année - Felice Anno Nuovo - Szczęśliwego nowego roku!! :thumbsup:
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Re: Shanghai 1932

Post by tigre » 01 Jan 2016 16:41

Hello to all :D; a little more....................

THE SINO- JAPANESE CLASH AT SHANGHAI, 1932.

Chain of incidents that led to the clash.

At dawn on 28th January, the Japanese men-of-war at Shanghai moved and took up their stations alongside their nationals' wharves and interests. The gunboat Ataka, flagship of Rear-Admiral Shiozawa, went alongside the N.Y.K. (Nippon Yusen Kaisha) Wharf adjacent to the Japanese consulate. The Japanese Admiral informed the commanders of other foreign defence forces that he might have to take action against the Chinese on the following day, and in consequence the Municipal Council held a meeting and at 1330 declared a State of Emergency as from 1600 that day. In the afternoon, the Japanese cruiser Yubari arrived with twelve destroyers. The aircraft carrier Notoro proceeded from the Whangpoo to Woosung.

At the Japanese landing party headquarters at Hongkew Park there was considerable activity. The landing party itself had been reinforced from the ships in the river, and a large number of Japanese nationals were being enrolled as special volunteers. They wore no special uniform, but had a brassard on their arms, and were known as " Ronin." At about 2300 that night, the Japanese forces moved off from their headquarters to occupy the position allocated to them under the defence scheme. Exactly what happened next will probably never be known.

The fact remains, however, that fighting did break out, and it was undoubtedly a surprise to the Japanese that they found themselves confronted with troops when they probably expected that the mere display of force would send the Chinese flying.

The Japanese Admiral stated in his proclamation, issued at the time, that the reason for his action was the general restlessness prevailing in and outside the Settlement and the necessity for protecting Japanese residents in Chapei.

During the fighting which ensued rifles, machine guns and star shell were used, and the Chinese also used trench mortars in reply. Numerous fires soon broke out in the Chapei area. From about 0440 on 29th January, aircraft were heard flying overhead and flares were dropped. Later in the morning many Japanese aircraft were observed in the air flying over Chapei and dropping bombs on what was after ascertained to be the North Railway Station. All day rifle and machine gun fire and the aerial bombing continued.

An interesting situation arose when the Japanese attempted to pass from their own sector of defence into that held by the Shanghai Volunteer Corps, in order to make an attack on the Chinese in the North Railway Station. This was disallowed by the Shanghai Volunteer Corps, and the Japanese had to go back into their own sector.

Much to the surprise of the Japanese, the Chinese put up a stubborn resistance. The fighting was of the most difficult kind, taking place in the centre of a densely built over and populated district. The Chinese made full use of snipers and " plain-clothes men.

At 2000 a truce was arranged by the British and American consuls general, but intermittent firing continued throughout the night.

Telegrams received late on 29th January indicated that the situation at Shanghai had become so serious that it was necessary for the Commander-in-Chief to proceed there personally. Kent sailed at 0600 the following morning and proceeded at high speed for Shanghai, calling in to fuel at Manila for a few hours on and February. Suffolk was also ordered to proceed to Shanghai with despatch from Hong Kong on 30th January, and arrived there on 31st January. Berwick, having embarked the 2nd battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and a mountain battery of the Hong Kong and Singapore Brigade with their stores and equipment, sailed from Hong Kong on 1st February and arrived at Shanghai on 3rd February.

On 30th January the Nanking government made known their attitude, and placed the whole onus of the clash on the Japanese. They stated that the Mayor of Shanghai had acceded to the four original Japanese demands, but when the Japanese Admiral suddenly demanded the withdrawal of the Chinese troops stationed in the neighbourhood, in Chinese controlled territory where they had every right to be, the demands were too humiliating and could not be agreed to.

The situation was extremely serious, and China once more appealed to H.M. Government and the League of Nations to intervene and cause Japan to respect her obligations under the international peace treaties to which she, as well as China, was a party, and to cease these acts of aggression.

The Chinese lodged strong protests with the foreigners for allowing the Japanese to make use of the International Settlement from whence to attack Chinese forces.

On 30th January the Lancashire arrived at Shanghai with the Wiltshire Regiment, who had come in the normal course of events to relieve the Scots Fusiliers, but owing to the situation the latter were retained, as well as the Wiltshires.

Source: THE NAVAL REVIEW. February 1933.

Cheers. Raúl M 8-).

Feliz Año Nuevo - Happy New Year - feliz Ano Novo - gluckliches Neues Jahr - Bonne Année - Felice Anno Nuovo - Szczęśliwego nowego roku!! :thumbsup:
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Re: Shanghai 1932

Post by tigre » 06 Jan 2016 13:55

Hello to all ; a little more....................

THE SINO- JAPANESE CLASH AT SHANGHAI, 1932.

Chain of incidents that led to the clash.

On 31st January at a Defence Committee meeting it was pointed out to the Japanese that they seemed to be taking unnecessary measures for the " defence " of their sector, and that such steps could only indicate an intended advance and attack on the Chinese. At the time of this meeting there were 17 Japanese aeroplanes flying over the Settlement, and protests against this movement, which must inevitably bring Chinese gunfire into the Settlement, were lodged.

Between 1000 and 1250 a meeting was held at the British consulate general, at which the United States consul general also attended, between the Japanese and Chinese commanders, but nothing resulted beyond the Japanese commander sending out and having the aeroplanes stopped from flying over the Settlement. In the meantime, street fighting and machine gun fire was much on the increase, both in Hongkew and around the Astor House Hotel, the roof of which was manned by snipers, and stray bullets were picked up round the British consulate.

At 1100, Suffolk arrived and berthed at the Shanghai and Hongkew Pootung Wharf. She reported having passed the Japanese Third Squadron-Naka, Abukuma and Yura-and Notoro with her attendant destroyers, anchored at Woosung, but had seen no sign of any of the larger Japanese carriers, whose presence in the vicinity was strongly suspected, from the number and presence of land machines operating over Shanghai. It was subsequently ascertained that both Kaga and Hosho were operating from a base in the Saddle Islands ; they were rarely sighted by any ships, and continued operating from there until the land aerodromes had been completed at The Point, Shanghai. During the night machine gunfire in the Yangtsepoo district was particularly severe.

On 31st January the Japanese naval force at Nanking-three cruisers-was reinforced by four destroyers, and a tense situation existed in the
Capital ; so much so, in fact, that the Government withdrew to Loyang, situated well out of reach of the Japanese naval forces.

On 1st February British ships provided guards for the British consulate, and a curfew was enforced in the International Settlement from 2200 till 0400.

On 1st February there was an incident at Nanking, the exact cause of which was, as usual, uncertain, but Bridgewater, British senior naval officer there, reports that a bomb was thrown at the Japanese sentries at the entrance to the N.Y.K. hulk to which their consulate had removed. The immediate result was that the Japanese ships opened fire, thinking that the Chinese batteries on Lion Hill, which command the bund and river, had opened fire on them. Only a few rounds were fired and thereafter no further hostile acts occurred at Nanking, though for many days the situation remained critical and a general state of alarm existed. The Americans actually evacuated all their nationals, but only the women and children of the British were removed.

To revert once more to Shanghai, at about 0500 on 2nd February, heavy rifle and machine-gun fire broke out in the vicinity of the Japanese flagship Ataka, lying alongside the Japanese consulate-general. Ataka switched on searchlights and opened fire with machine-guns in reply. Plain-clothes men had attacked her from the roofs of neighbouring buildings, the Astor House Hotel in particular. Fires broke out in the vicinity, but no great damage was done.

On 3rd February, at the request of the leading shipping companies, Suffolk and Cornwall landed guards on their wharves, as the coolies were becoming either anti-foreign or intimidated by anti-foreign societies. As these wharves were in the Japanese sector, it was of course necessary
to arrange with the Japanese Admiral before the guards could be landed. He had no objection whatsoever, and the matter was arranged amicably.

It was at this stage that the forts at Woosung opened fire on a Japanese destroyer that happened to be passing ; the destroyer immediately returned the fire. The Japanese Rear-Admiral then issued a declaration that he intended to occupy the forts.

The night of 3rd February passed off quietly, but the usual firing broke out at daylight, and during the forenoon gunfire in the Chapei-Hongkew-Yangtsepoo area became more intense than before. The Japanese landing party had their headquarters at Hongkew Park, and the Chinese had an armoured train, mounting two 75 mm guns, on the Shanghai-Nantao section of the railway, with which they were bombarding the Japanese headquarters. The Japanese fire seemed to be concentrated on the area around the North Railway Station, on which district their aeroplanes were dropping bombs continually. Fierce fires were raging. Towards sunset the action eased.

Source: THE NAVAL REVIEW. February 1933.

Cheers. Raúl M .
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Re: Shanghai 1932

Post by tigre » 10 Jan 2016 08:59

Hello to all :D; a little more....................

THE SINO- JAPANESE CLASH AT SHANGHAI, 1932.

Chain of incidents that led to the clash.

At Woosung, where Sandwich was stationed, the following incident occurred on 4th February. At about 10:45 the flagship of the Japanese Third Squadron, Naka (Rear-Admiral Hori), made a signal to Sandwich asking her to shift berth as she was fouling their range, and when this had been done, the thiee cruisers Naka, Abukuma and Yura, and three destroyers opened fire and commenced a bombardment of Woosung Forts, which lasted until about 12:45, when the cruisers anchored. Several destroyers passed up and down to Shanghai during the afternoon, each firing at point blank range into Woosung as they passed, and aeroplanes continued bombing the forts.

All shipping was held up while firing was in progress, but by 17:15 the Japanese flagship signalled that it was safe to proceed up harbour, and the shipping, which by then had reached considerable numbers, was released and allowed to proceed.

During the bombardment the reply from the forts was ineffective, and Sandwich reported that objects suspiciously like round shot appeared to be bounding across the water. Machine-gun fire was resorted to against the destroyers.

On 5th February the Commander-in-Chief arrived in Kent and proceeded up the Whangpoo to the naval buoys. On passing Woosung Forts, all guns except one appeared normal, and no great damage appeared to have been done.

The men-of-war then in Shanghai were :
BRITISH . . . . Kent, Cornwall, Berwick, Suffolk, Sandwich and Petered.
U.S.A. . . . . Houston and ten destroyers.
FRANCE. . . . Altair, Craonne and Tahure.
ITALIAN . . . . Libia and Sebastiano Caboto.
JAPANESE. . . . Cruisers-Naka, Abukuma, Yura, Yubari and Oi.
Old Mining Vessel-Tokima.
Gunboats-Ataka and Katata.
Destroyers-Twenty (2nd, 15th, 22nd, 26th
and 30th Flotillas).
Aircraft Carriers-Kaga and Hosho off the Saddles.
Notoro (seaplanes) at Woosung.

The Commander-in-Chief, on arrival, sent for Admiral Shiozawa to discuss the situation, and at 19:30 that night Admiral Shiozawa called on the Commander-in-Chief.

After considerable discussion, the Japanese Admiral agreed that a mutual evacuation, the Japanese to their original defence line, and the Chinese to withdraw from the Chapei and Paoshan suburbs to 2,000 yards beyond a line joining the north-west point of the Settlement and the north point of the Hongkew Salient, would be acceptable conditions for an armistice.

The following day, 6th February, Berwick relieved Sandwich at Woosung. In the morning an endeavour was made to get into touch with the Chinese general. This was found to be impossible, but the chairman of the Municipal Council was able to arrange a meeting for the Commander-in-Chief with Mr. T. V. Soong, former minister of finance, and the brains of the Chiang Kai Shek government, who was in Shanghai.

The meeting took place in Mr. Soong's house in the French Concession. The Minister agreed to the proposed withdrawal of Chinese troops from the suggested area, but of course objected to the Hongkew Salient remaining in the occupation of the Japanese. The Commander-in-Chief asked Admiral Shiozawa to come and see him this same evening to discuss the matter again in the light of this interview.

The aerial bombing, and bombardment of Woosung by destroyers, continued off and on throughout the day, as also the firing in the Chapei area. At 23:20 heavy bombardment and machine-gun fire was observed and heard in the Chapei area.

At 05:00 on 7th February, the Yubari and three Japanese destroyers sailed down river from Shanghai, showing navigation lights only. From 08:00 onwards bombers were operating over Chapei throughout the day, and at 09:00 five flights of three machines each attacked Woosung, the forts replying with machine and rifle gunfire. In accordance with information received from the Japanese, a broadcast signal was made to all British shipping, warning them that the Japanese intended to occupy the Woosung Forts that day.

Source: THE NAVAL REVIEW. February 1933.

Cheers. Raúl M 8-).
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Re: Shanghai 1932

Post by michael mills » 11 Jan 2016 23:25

The Chinese troops who attacked the Japanese Naval Landing Detachment belonged to the 19th Route Army, a warlord force from Guangzhou that was not under the effective control of the Guomindang Government in Nanjing, and had entered Shanghai essentially for the purpose of extorting money from the Shanghai Municipal Government, an action for which the Chinese warlords were notorious.

The Shanghai Municipal Government had even paid a large bribe to the commander of the 19th Route army to leave the city, but instead it stayed to engage the Japanese forces. It is unknown why the Chinese troops made that decision; perhaps they were influenced by the nationalist agitation was taking place in Shanghai in the wake of the incidents involving the attack on the Japanese monks and the burning of the Chinse factory.

What is known is that the 19th Route Army had not been ordered by the Guomindang Government to attack the Japanese forces stationed in Shanghai; it was acting on its own initiative. It was only at a later stage that Jiang sent forces under his command into the battle.

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Re: Shanghai 1932

Post by tigre » 14 Jan 2016 13:08

Hello to all :D; thanks for that tip michael mills :wink:. A little more....................

THE SINO- JAPANESE CLASH AT SHANGHAI, 1932.

Chain of incidents that led to the clash.

At noon (Feb 07), two Japanese river steamers proceeded up the Whangpoo, escorted past the forts by three destroyers. They proceeded alongside the Woosung railway jetty and disembarked a Japanese mixed brigade, under Major-General Shimoto. Vice-Admiral Nomura, in Idzumo, arrived at Woosung from Japan at mid-day.

At 14:00, Yubari opened fire on Woosung village from the Whangpoo, and the bombardment of Woosung by Yubari and eight destroyers at practically point blank range continued through the afternoon, whilst at the same time the mixed brigade attacked Woosung village and forts from the south, but failed to get across the creek. Eventually a defensive position on the south bank was occupied. The Woosung forts made no reply, except with machine-gun fire and some form of pom-pom. At about 19:00 the firing on Woosung ceased.

At 16:40 an urgent message was received from the Chinese military at Woosung, to say that a British man-of-war was fouling the range. Berwick was therefore ordered to keep well clear, and in reply she stated that at no time was she anywhere near the direct line of fire from the forts to the Japanese ships, nor had any ship been so situated.

That night, the Japanese destroyer Asagari, whilst carrying out some operations off Woosung, collided with Berwick, cutting her cable, but otherwise doing no damage. Berwick re-anchored.

Firing in the Hongkew-Chapei area continued throughout the day, and fires were observed over a large area. At night the lighting effect and glare was magnificent.

Events on 8th February were similar to those on 7th February. Yubari, Tatsuta and destroyers kept up the bombardment of Woosung, and there was more or less continual bombardment and bombing in the Chapei-Hongkew area.

Idzumo, flying the flag of Vice-Admiral Nomura, came up river and took Ataka's place alongside the Japanese consulate-general. The Ataka shifted alongside the Tokiwa at the Japanese naval buoys.

On 9th February, Vice-Admiral Nomura called on the Commander-in-Chief and discussed the situation, and at the time was apparently agreeable to the establishment of a neutral zone and the withdrawal of the Chinese to a distance of only 5,000 yards. Shortly after he had returned to his flagship, however, he sent a staff officer to inform the commander-in-chief that after consideration with his staff he had decided that the minimum depth of withdrawal of the Chinese must be 25 kilometres.

The bombardment of Woosung by Yubari and destroyers, the fighting in the Chapei-Hongkew area, and the aerial bombing of both "fronts" continued throughout the day.

The evening of 9th February mark the conclusion of the first phase in the operations, and the situation was then briefly as follows:

The Chinese-Strength about 20,000 rifles, with a small proportion of artillery-in occupation of Chapei and to the north, and of the Woosung village and forts area.

The Japanese-Strength not more than 10,000 of which half was naval landing parties-facing the Chinese on the south bank of the Woosung creek, and in occupation of the Hongkew area east of the railway.

The fighting continued on 10th and 11th February, little progress being made on either side. On 10th February, Vice-Admiral Herr, Commander-in-Chief of the French naval forces in the Far East, arrived and secured to the French naval buoys astern of Kent. On 11th February, a Japanese bomber dropped a bomb on the Wing On cotton mill, which is situated in the American sector of the Settlement in Markham Road. This bomb killed five and wounded sixteen Chinese.

On 12th February the truce was preserved, with the exception of a certain amount of sniping in the Chapei area. At the Woosung front there was more activity, and the bombing and bombardment started early in the day. At the end of the day's fighting the Japanese were still on the south side of the creek.

Source: THE NAVAL REVIEW. February 1933.
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Cheers. Raúl M 8-).
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Re: Shanghai 1932

Post by tigre » 17 Jan 2016 12:29

Hello to all :D; a little more....................

THE SINO- JAPANESE CLASH AT SHANGHAI, 1932.

Chain of incidents that led to the clash.

On 13th February fighting at Woosung and in the Chapei-Hongkew area continued. At 17:00 five Japanese transports arrived with troops, stores, power boats and flat bottomed boats, and more transports were reported arriving; this was the beginning of the arrival of the 9th Division.

The 14th, 15th and 16th February were occupied with the arrival and disembarkation of the 9th Division, under the command of Lieutenant-General Uyeda. This division arrived in 16 transports and disembarked at the Japanese wharves within the Settlement boundaries. The transports were escorted past Woosung Forts by destroyers engaging the shore at point blank range.

By this date the Japanese had established an aerodrome at The Point, just outside the extreme north-eastern corner of the International Settlement. Cornwall, on passing on her way to relieve Berwick at Woosung, reported that on 15th February there were 16 multi-seater and 10 single-seater aircraft actually on the landing ground and the Japanese laid a submarine cable from the aerodrome down the Whangpoo to the seaplane carrier Notoro, anchored off Woosung.

During the disembarkation on the night of 16th-17th February the Chinese shelled the N.Y.K. Wharf area, and seriously wounded two able seamen who were at the time on duty as part of the guard from H.M.S. Suffolk at the British-owned Shanghai and Hongkew Wharf a short distance higher up the river. These two men died of their wounds the same evening.

By the morning of 17th February the 9th Division had disembarked and was billeted in the Japanese mills in the Yangtsepoo district of the International Settlement. By mid-day the relief of part of the naval landing party in the Hongkew area had commenced. The night of 17th- 18th February passed off quietly, and by the morning of 18th February the Japanese 9th Division was ready to take the field.

On 18th February there was a final meeting between the Japanese and Chinese military commanders, at which the Japanese put forward their conditions for peaceful settlement. As was expected, the meeting broke up without an agreement having been reached, and at 21:00 the Japanese presented an ultimatum, demanding, amongst other requirements, the withdrawal of the Chinese military forces to a distance of 20 kilometres from the Settlement and the demilitarisation of the Woosung area. This ultimatum was to expire at 17:00 on 20th February, but if the Chinese intended to accept, they were to commence withdrawal by 07:00 on 20th February.

During the night 18th-19th February several more Chinese shells fell on the wharves on which naval guards were posted from H.M. ships. On the afternoon of 19th February General Uyeda held a meeting at his headquarters, where he explained to the military representatives of foreign powers the situation as he viewed it, and the way he considered it necessary to take action.

On 20th February, at 07:30, as the Chinese had made no movement to the rear, the Japanese commenced an offensive movement on land. Two columns accompanied by tanks and cavalry moved westwards from the Shanghai-Woosung road directed north and south of Kiangwan racecourse. By the evening an approximate north and south line through the eastern outskirts of Kiangwan village had been gained and junction effected with the Japanese troops at Hongkew Park. The area north of Woosung Creek was heavily shelled and bombed all day, but no other offensive action taken against it. An attempted forward movement into Chapei failed. The Chinese resistance was unexpectedly stout.

21st February opened with a renewed Japanese bombardment at Woosung, which was continued most of the forenoon. Little further progress was made in the Kiangwan area, except north of the village, where the line of the Hongkew creek was gained.

Source: THE NAVAL REVIEW. February 1933.
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Cheers. Raúl M 8-).
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