Soviet aid to Chiang 1937-40

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Peter H
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Soviet aid to Chiang 1937-40

Post by Peter H » 14 Sep 2005 09:00

From Jung Chang's Mao The Unknown Story,page 209:
Stalin signed a non-agression pact with Nanjing on 21 August ,and started to supply Chiang with weapons.China could not manufacture any weapons except rifles.Stalin advanced Chiang US$250 million for arms purchases from Russia,which included 1,000 planes,plus tanks and artillery and committed a sizeable Soviet air force contingent.(From December 1937 to the end of 1939 more than 2,000 Soviet pilots flew combat missions,downing some 1,000 Japanese planes,and even bombing Japanese-occupied Taiwan.)Moscow sent some 300 military advisers,headed for a time by the Chinese-speaking Chuikov....For the next four years,the Soviet Union was not only China's main supplier of arms,but virtually its only source of heaby weapons,artillery,and planes.
The air raid on Formosa 1938:

http://worldatwar.net/chandelle/v3/v3n1/luks.html
Last edited by Peter H on 14 Sep 2005 10:10, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Peter H » 14 Sep 2005 10:08

Soviet pilots in civilian garb.

Image
http://images.china.cn/images1/200508/177489.jpg

More here:

http://www.china.org.cn/english/fetures/WWII/137346.htm

http://english.people.com.cn/200509/01/ ... 05672.html
Statistic showed that a total of 3,665 soldiers of the former Soviet Union had been dispatched to join the Battle in China from 1937 to 1941, including 1,091 pilots. More than 200 of them died in China.
Soviet bombers in China:

http://www.j-aircraft.com/research/Geor ... _china.htm

Soviet fighters in China:

http://www.j-aircraft.com/research/Geor ... part_4.htm

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Peter H
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Post by Peter H » 14 Sep 2005 10:15

http://www.bjreview.com.cn/En-2005/05-33-e/SP-5.htm
An aviation school was set up in Yining, in northwest China’s Xinjiang, in August 1939. By 1940, a total of 328 Chinese personnel had received aviation training at the school under the guidance of Soviet instructors. Before the school was established, more air force personnel, including 1,045 pilots, 81 navigators and 198 gunners and radio operators, as well as approximately 8,000 other aviation technicians, were trained in the Soviet Union. Statistics show that more than 90,000 Chinese military personnel received training in various military schools, training sessions and military units under the guidance of Soviet experts.
There were two main routes along which weapons and military equipment were shipped to China. They were transported either from Sevastopol, Vladivostok and other ports in the Soviet Union to Hong Kong, Haiphong in Viet Nam or Rangoon in Myanmar by sea and from there shipped to China’s hinterland via the Yunnan-Viet Nam Railway or Sichuan-Myanmar Highway, or from Alma-Ata (now Almaty in Kazakhstan) to Lanzhou via Urumqi. In addition, the Soviet Union operated an air route from Alma-Ata to Lanzhou under extremely difficult circumstances.

The Soviet Union committed a huge amount of resources to ensure the uninterrupted supply of military necessities to China. From October 1937 to February 1939, at least 5,640 freight trains were deployed to transport military materials to China. During the same period, more than 5,260 motor vehicles traveled some 18.5 million km along the Saryozek-Lanzhou Highway to deliver military materials. More than 4,000 Soviet personnel were engaged in this unremitting endeavor.

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asiaticus
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artillery ?

Post by asiaticus » 15 Sep 2005 18:29

Any word on what artillery was sent to the Chinese?

I know the 200th Mechanized Division was equipped with Soviet tanks, armored cars and trucks to make a fully motorized Divison.

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Post by Peter H » 16 Sep 2005 05:08

This link gives Soviet weaponary supplied as follows:

http://wio.ru/spain/china-a.htm
1250 planes, incl. 216 I-16 types 5, 6 and 10 ("Swallow"); six TB-3; 213 I-15 and I-15bis; R-5; SB-2; DB-3A; UTI-4, UT-1
82 tanks (T-26 and BT-5)
arm.cars (BA-3, BA-6, BA-10, BA-20)
1850 trucks and tracktors
50mm mortars
1600 guns, incl. 76mm field and flak guns
14000 MGs
rifles; fuel and oil; ammo; medical stuff; spare parts
The 76mm flak seemed a priority as well:

http://easyget.narod.ru/artl/3-k.html

The first deliveries in 1937 included the following:
The first two steamers with 6182 tons of military cargo departed Sevastopol in the second half of November 1937. On board, among the motor and armored vehicles (82 T-26 tanks, 30 motors, and 568 crates of spare parts for the T-26, 30 Komintern tractors, 10 ZIS-6 trucks), various infantry and artillery weapons, were also included 20 76mm anti-aircraft guns and 40 thousand rounds for them, 207 crates with control mechanisms for them, 4 searchlight units, 2 sound locators, and aviation armaments.
http://www.j-aircraft.com/research/Geor ... _of_ch.htm

A good photo from here as well: http://mailer.fsu.edu/~akirk/tanks/china/china.html

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http://mailer.fsu.edu/~akirk/tanks/china/T-26-a.jpg

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asiaticus
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re: artillery

Post by asiaticus » 19 Oct 2005 03:15

Thanks for the info on the artillery.

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