The Sino-Japanese War(Campaigns in detail)

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asiaticus
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Part 3 Course of the Winter Offensive in North China

Post by asiaticus » 18 Jun 2006 07:43

Most of the following is taken from the narrative in Hsu Long-hsuen and Chang Ming-kai, History of The Sino-Japanese War
Page 319-334 and Map 19 posted above. I have tried to ID the current names of localities and if possible name the units involved if not mentioned in the text, since there was no orbat for either side listed there. The IJA in China orbat, 1937 to 1945, posted on the China Defense forum: http://www.china-defense.com/forum/show ... php?t=1168, was helpful in locating the Japanese units as was the map 1 from Resistance and Revolution posted at:
http://content.cdlib.org:8088/xtf/view? ... view=print

The Expedia find a map page:
http://www.expedia.com/pub/agent.dll?qscr=mmfn
is a great help in getting a good topo map to understand the situation and locate places named in the narrative.

As always contributions, corrections, comments welcome.

asiaticus
-------------------


Part 3 Course of the Winter Offensive in North China

The preparations for the offensive were to be finished by November 26, 1937. The secondary attacks were to be launched at the end of November and the main attacks at the beginning of December. [1]

2nd War Area

Prior to the beginning of the offensive on December 3rd, the Japanese had attacked 2nd War Area forces at Hsia Hsien [Xiaxian] and Wen-hsi [Wenxi] on the Tungpu [Tatung - Poochow] Railroad. Nine days later the Japanese were defeated loosing, according to the Chinese, 3000 Japanese and a battalion commander (Enoshima?) were lost. The mopping up of remaining Japanese minor strong points in the area lasted until the 20th of December when they were wiped out.

On December 10th, 1939, the 2nd War Area general offensive began. Japanese strong points at Heng-ling-kuan [Henglingguan, a pass south of Chiang-Hsien [Jiangxian]], Chen-feng-ta [?] and Yen-chang-chen [Nianzhang] were encircled and communications on the nearby highways were destroyed by the advancing Chinese. 4th Army Group and 5th Army Group joined forces in attacking Japanese positions at Hsia Hsien [Xiaxian] and other places in the area. By late December, Pei-she [Beishe] southeast of Wen-hsi [Wenxi] was cleared of Japanese troops.

In response the Japanese 37th Division counterattacked with 2000 men and artillery from Yun-cheng [Yuncheng] and Hsia Hsien [Xiaxian].
By early January 1940, elements of 98th Corps and 7th Division repeatedly counterattacked, killing several hundred Japanese, resulting in a stalemate. Meanwhile another Chinese force (34th Corps?) attacked the Tungpu Railroad between Wen-hsi [Wenxi] and An-yi [Anyi] destroying traffic communications.

To the northeast of the 4th and 5th Army Groups, 14th Army Group attacked Yi-cheng [Yicheng] and Chiang Hsien [Jiangxian]. On December 15th, the Japanese (41st Division?) counterattacked with 5000 troops supported by artillery and aircraft, resulting in bitter fighting and heavy casualties for both sides. On December 18th, Lung-hua Chen [Longhua] was taken by the Chinese who pursued the retreating Japanese toward Yi-cheng [Yicheng].

Meanwhile in Eastern Shanxi the 40th Corps and 27th Corps began their attack on the Japanese 36th Division in the Chang-chih [Zhangzi] and Chang-tze [Changzhi] area on December 13th. 27th Corps successively captured strong points on the outskirts of Chang-tze [Changzhi] and Tun-liu [Tunliu] encircling the Japanese in those towns. On January 1st 1940 the Japanese organized a counterattack with 10,000 infantry, cavalry and artillery troops drawn from their surrounding defenses and with air support attacked Chinese positions southwest of Chang-tze [Changzhi]. The Chinese 46th and 8th Reserve Divisions fought a see-saw battle with the Japanese from their positions at Hsien-wong Temple, Yanlu and Chin-yi villages which lead to heavy casualties on both sides.

On the morning of January 3rd the main force of the 40th Corps opened a day long attack on the Japanese that caught them between the two forces of the Chinese, suffering heavy loss was forced to withdraw to the outskirts of Chang-tze [Changzhi]. 40th Corps continued its attack on Japanese strongpoint between Hu-kuan [Huguan] and south of Chang-tze [Changzhi].

On January 20th and 24th the Chinese forces cut the Han-Chang [Hantan - Chang-chih] Highway northeast of Chang-tze [Changzhi] capturing Li-Cheng [Licheng], and Tung-yang-kuan [Dongyangguan], a pass east of Licheng and She-Hsien [She-xian]. On January 28th, another force captured Lu-cheng [Lucheng] but continued in bitter fighting with Japanese forces east of the town.

Long-hsuen's, History of The Sino-Japanese War then ends the narrative of the operation with the mention that supply difficulties that greatly effected operations ensued because of Communist raids in their rear area and instigation of revolts, which seized food and forbade food to be sold to the government forces. Despite this it would seem that the 40th Corps and 27th Corps accomplished their aim of pinning down the Japanese. However in southwestern Shanxi the main effort of 2nd War Area and of the whole North China offensive failed to seize the major towns on the railroad or Japanese strongpoint that were their objectives or to cut the Tungpu Railroad except for the area between Wen-hsi [Wenxi] and An-yi [Anyi]. At the end of the campaign the 2nd War Area claimed 13,770 enemies killed or wounded.


1st War Area

On the 1st of December the 3rd Army Group guerillas cut the Lung-hai Railway near Lo-wang [Luowang], Nei-huang [Neihuanggi], and east and west of Lanfeng [Lankao]. They also cut the highways at Tung-hsu [Tongxu], Huai-yang [Huaiyang] and Lu-yi [Luyi]. Meanwhile the 81st Division's main force attacked Kai-feng while some of its elements attacked Lanfeng. Lowang RR station was taken on December 15 and the Division entered Kai-feng next day clearing the Japanese troops, burning warehouses and a headquarters there (35th Division?).

Meanwhile to the southeast 2nd Cavalry Corps moved east of Po-Hsien [Boxian], encircled and attacked Kuei-teh [Shangqiu] from the east, overrunning an airfield and burning aviation fuel there. Another force intercepted and defeated relief forces (from 21st Division?) moving west from Tang-shan [Dangshan] on the Lung-hai Railway.

North of the Yellow River 36th Army Group attacked. Its New 5th Corps on December 6th attacked elements of the Japanese 1st Independent Mixed Brigade north and south of An-yang [Anyang], succeeded in destroying bridges along the roads at Chi, Chun, Tang-yin, and Pao-lien Temple Station. On December 13th the 47th Corps cleared the Tai-hsing Shan [Taihang Mountain] and cut the Tao-tsin Railroad taking the rail stations at Po-shan [?] and Chang-kou [?]. 9th Corps attacked elements of the Japanese 35th Division between Po-ai [Bo'ai] and Hsin-yang [Jixian] cutting the between them and attacking the defenders on the outskirts of Hsin-yang [Jixian] and strongpoint at Wu-she [Mucheng], part of 47th Division and demolition teams broke into Hsin-yang [Jixian] for half attempting to clear it of enemy troops.

At the end of the campaign narrative 1st War Area reports claims of 5130 enemy killed and seems to have executed its mission of tying down the Japanese troops in the area fairly well.


8th War Area

Though a minor theater of the war, there are a lot of details on the execution of the 8th War Area operations [1]. In the preliminary attacks on December 18th, 6th Cavalry Corps and the Advance Force cut the railroad between Kuei-sui [Hohhot] and Sa-la-chi [Salqin] to prevent IJA reinforcement's movement to relive Pao-tou [Baotou]. At the same time 81st Corps attacked An-pei [Dashetai] capturing it and destroying most of the garrison as it fled the next day.

On the 19th, 81st Corps' 101st Division captured Chien-tze-kou [Tailiang, Ming'an?] between An-pei [Dashetai] and Pao-tou [Baotou] and continued eastward until it encountered a Japanese force in 50 trucks and with 7 tanks near Mao-kuei-shen-yao-tze [Maojiagedu?]. Fighting lasted till dark, the Japanese losing a tank and 10 trucks. At Kung-yi-hsing [Erh-hsiang-kung-yao-tzu?, 10 km north of Baotou] guerrillas destroyed 44 Japanese moving south from Kuyang [Guyang] to reinforce Pao-tou [Baotou]. Elements of the New 32nd and 101st Divisions wiped out a Japanese force that had fled to Peihuangtsaoyu [?].

The Main force of 35th Corps attacked Pao-tou [Baotou] on December 19th and entered the city on the 20th, capturing the Japanese Cavalry Group[2] headquarters and warehouses in house to house fighting with the enemy. By noon of the 22nd the Japanese had been driven into the southwestern corner of the city.

Meanwhile the Japanese had been making efforts to relive the beleaguered Cavalry Group. From the Peiping-Tientsin area they sent a force in 200 trucks with 2000 troops, with more than 10 guns and 8 tanks and the air support of 4 planes. Over half of this force was destroyed by the Chinese on the outskirts of Pao-tou [Baotou] on the 22nd. On the 24th the additional reinforcement arrived. These were apparently enough to force the Chinese to go on the defensive, having achieved their goal of tying down the enemy. By late January 1940 the Japanese had built up forces (from 26th Division ? [2]) at Pao-tou [Baotou] sufficient to launch an offensive to recover lost territory and move west to take Wu-yuan [Wuyuan] which fell on February 3rd and Lin-ho [Linhe] further west on the 4th. The 8th War Area command ordered a counter attack to recover Wu-yuan [Wuyuan] from the Japanese.

Battle of Wuyuan
On March 16th as the Japanese were pressuring its New 4th Division the rest of the 35th Corps with New 31st Division and a regiment of the Garrison Brigade, secretly moved east along the Wu-chia River. On the night of the 20th they entered the city by surprise and after a seesaw fight over the strongpoint captured the city at 1600 hours on the 21st, the Japanese garrison retreating northward.[3] Chinese forces then moved on to capture strongpoint around Hsing-lung-chang [Hsin-an-chen, aka Xin'an?] on the 22nd. This would have cut the road along the Yellow River to Wu-yuan.

In an attempt to recover the situation the Japanese sent 600 troops from An-pei [Dashetai] via Siyitang, in 80 trucks to make a forced crossing of the Wu-chia River at Ta-tsai-chu 10km north of Wu-yuan. For three days they fought the 101st Division without success. By the 25th they had been reinforced to 3,000 men and made the crossing with artillery and air support. Wu-yuan again fell to the Japanese on the 26th and the Chinese fell back to the banks of Fang-chi-chu [?] and continued their attacks at Pa-tze-pu [Xin'an], Hsi-shan-tzu [Xishanzui?], Hsi-(Hsia?)-chiao [Xixiaozhao?], and Man-ko-su [?].

Unable to withstand the pressure of Chinese attacks, the Japanese at Wu-yuan retreated on March 30th and 31st. On April 1st a guerrilla force and cavalry column recaptured Wu-yuan and the 11th Provisional Division recaptured Wu-pu-lang-kou [?]. On April 3rd Cavalry recovered Hsi-shan-tzu [Xishanzui?] as the Japanese retreated to the east.

Deep in the Japanese rear areas in early December, Hopei-Chahar War Area is said to have successfully used its 69th Corps with its New 6th Division and guerilla forces to cut communications between Pao-ting [Bao-ding] and Hsing-tai [Xingtai], and at Tsang-chow [Cangzhou] and Teh-chow [Dezhou]. To the south Shangtung-Kwangtung War Area, in late December 51st Corps did sabotage the railroad in the vicinities of Tai-an [Tai'an], Teng Hsien [Tengxian] and Chu-hsien [Chuzhou] disrupting traffic between the north and south of China.

Sources:
[1] Hsu Long-hsuen and Chang Ming-kai, History of The Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) 2nd Ed. ,1971. Translated by Wen Ha-hsiung , Chung Wu Publishing; 33, 140th Lane, Tung-hwa Street, Taipei, Taiwan Republic of China.

Page 319-334 Chinese Winter Offensive (Late Nov 1939 - Late March 1940)
Map 19

[2] IJA in China orbat, 1937 to 1945
http://www.china-defense.com/forum/show ... php?t=1168


[3] From http://www.uglychinese.org/war.htm#Ichigo

from: 1939-40 Winter Campaign

"On Feb 21st 1940, General Fu Zuoyi discussed the lessons from the battles of Baotou [on the middle point of north bank of North Yellow River Bend] and Sui-xi [western Suiyuan Prov] and authorized a recovery campaign by taking advantage of the water overflow in March. In March, Fu Zuoyi ordered the breach of river in Wulahao, causing the inundation of two major highways. On early morning of March 21st, Fu Zuoyi selected one hundred brave officers and soliders for a stealthy entry into Wuyuan as plaincoats.

At that time, Japanese army had with them 54 Chinese women looted from Shanxi Prov as "comfort women". Wang Fusen, a puppet army solider, encountered eight Japanese soldiers raping a teenager girl who kowtowed to Wang Fusen for saving her life. Japanese, however, continued gang-raping and moreover pierced the girl's belly in front of Wang Fusen. After Wang Fusen informed his team of the atrocity, the puppet army fought with Japanese for taking back the women from the Japanese custody. ABout 23 puppet army soldiers, including Wang Fusen, died.

When Fu Zuoyi's plaincoats reached the citywall of Wuyuan, they encountered puppet army led by Wang Yingbu and managed to pursuade them into a defection. With Japanese army's "oral password", plaincoats intruded into the city and destroyed Japanese communication center. Japanese lieutenant general could not discern the situations. Japanese planes dropped bombs over Wuyuan in a chaos. By 11:00 am, Fu Zuoyi's New 32nd Division and 3rd Regiment of Garrison Brigade took over most of the city."

To cover up criminal acts, Japanese lieutenant general ordered that all 54 "comfort women" be pushed into a well and then the well was exploded into collapse. Japanese murdered a whole family nearby for witnessing the atrocity. 3000 Japanese were killed at the Battle of Wuyuan. Japanese lieutenant general and his entourage fled to Kangburong, about 25 to 30 kilometers to the east of Wuyuan where company chief Zhang Hansan of garrison brigade encircled the Japanese and destroyed them all after answering the call of guerrillas and civilians. The sabre of the Japanese lieutenant general was later transferred to 101st Division Chief Dong Qiwu. Chiang Kai-shek awarded Fu Zuoyi with a bonus of 300000 yuan."

Next: Course of the Winter Offensive in Central China

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Part 4 Course of the Winter Offensive in Central China

Post by asiaticus » 30 Jun 2006 07:05

Chinese Winter Offensive (Late Nov 1939 - Late March 1940)
Part 4 Course of the Offensive in Central China

Most of the following is taken from the narrative in Hsu Long-hsuen and Chang Ming-kai, History of The Sino-Japanese War
Page 319-334 and Map 19 posted above. I have tried to ID the current names of localities and if possible name the units involved if not mentioned in the text, since there was no orbat for either side listed there. The IJA in China orbat, 1937 to 1945, posted on the China Defense forum: http://www.china-defense.com/forum/show ... php?t=1168, was helpful in locating the Japanese units as was the map 1 from Resistance and Revolution posted at:
http://content.cdlib.org:8088/xtf/view? ... view=print

The Expedia find a map page:
http://www.expedia.com/pub/agent.dll?qscr=mmfn
is a great help in getting a good topo map to understand the situation and locate places named in the narrative.

As always contributions, corrections, comments welcome.

asiaticus
-------------

Chinese Winter Offensive (Late Nov 1939 - Late March 1940)
Part 4 Course of the Offensive in Central China


3rd War Area

3rd War Area's offensive began on December 16th. Two days later the 144th Division of the Right Flank Army's had taken Cha-Cha-shan [?] and Wang-chia-tan [Wanzi]. In the Cental Army area 10th Reseve Division, had taken Tsen-hsien-shan [?], Pai-fen-shang [?], Mao-tan [Maotan] and part of Cheng-chia-ta-shan [?] while the 16th Division took Pu-ling [?] and Hsiang-shan [?] and the 190th Division took Tuan-shan [?], Han-shan [?], and Shih-tze-shan [?]. 147th Division of Left Flank Army took Hui-lu-ling [?] and Kang-yao-ling [?].

However the Right Flank Army's 79th Division and 50th Corps failed to coordinate with Central Army so that it resulted in heavy losses to the 16th Divison and the 10th Reseve Division of the Cental Army. These Divisions subsequently were releived on December 20th by the 40th and 67th Divisons. On the 23rd the Japanese sent in reinforcements while their aircraft bombed the Chinese for days so that despite heavy attacks the Chinese failed to make any further progress.

On the 28th the Chinese redeployed their forces, the Right Flank and Central Army were to hold their existing positions while Right Flank Army organized two special columns built around an infantry regiment with some artillery and three teams built around an infantry battalion with artillery, engineer and minelaying detachments. These infiltrated to the river bank at Ti-kang, Wuhu and Ta-tung to attack enemy ships and lay mines. Central army sent teams out from Ching-yang to do the same thing. Meanwhile the Left Flank Army organized a defense to hold Pei-mien-shan [?] and Hung-tsao-shan [?], while they massed their artillery to attack shipping and laid drifting mines on the Yantze River.

Meanwhile to the south, the 10th Army Group attack by 192nd Division and 62nd Division took Hangchow, Fuyang and Yu-hang on the night of December 13th. Warehouses and puppet organization buildings were burned. The Japanese reacted by sending forces to contain the attacking forces while a regiment of the 22nd Division to strike south of Hangchow on January 21st 1940, making a forced crossing of the Chein-tang River, landing at Chiu-chia-tou [?] north of Hsiao-shan [Xiaoshan] and engaging the Chinese 2nd Resistance and Defense column at Chekiang [ ]. This force then split into two groups. The minor force moved to Kan-shan-tou [Kanshan] between Hsiao-shan [Xiaoshan] and Shao-hsing [Shaoxing] while the main force took Hsiao-shan [Xiaoshan] at noon and advanced eastward to Shao-hsing [Shaoxing]. On January 25th there was bitter fighting with 6th Resistance and Defense Column at Ko-chiao [Keqiao], with 8th Resistance and Defense Column at Lin-pu [Linpu] and parts of 2nd and 5th Resistance and Defense column and the 3rd District Self Defence Group at Pai-lu-tang [Bailutang]. On the 27th the Japanese reached Lin-pu Chen [Linpu] and were halted by Chinese forces at Kan-shan [Kanshan], Ya-chien [?], west of Suo-chien [?] and south of Yuey-ta-chiao [?] and east of Wen-chia-yen [?]. Under counterattack by the Chinese they fell back to Hsiao-shan City [Xiaoshan].

Also 3rd War Area's 32nd Army Group made some diversionary attacks south of Nanchang on the Kan River and sent plainclothes detachments into Nanchang to harrass the Japanese to aid the 9th War Area offensive.


9th War Area

On December 12 when the 9th War Area launched their offensive, 19th Army Group's 50th and 60th Corps attacked the Japanese at Wan-shou-kung [Wangshengang], Ta-cheng [Dacheng], and Kulo-pu [?] in the area north of Shih-tou-kang [Shitougang] and Kao-yu-shih [Gaoyou] and east of Hsiang-fu-kuan [Xiangfuguan], cut off the communications between Ta-cheng [Dacheng] and Nanchang and Chih-tien-chang[?]. They captured Wan-ling [?], Pu-ling [?], Hsiao-ling [?], Man-kang-ling [?], Chien-chow [Aicheng] and Pai-tze-chiao [?] northwest of Feng-hsin [Fengchuan]. On the night of December 13th Japanese warehouses north of Feng-hsin [Fengchuan] were burned while the main forc 139th Division, 32nd Corps attacked Ching-an [Jing'an]. On the night of the 21st Ching-an [Jing'an] was attacked, and Japanese warehouses were burned. 141st Division and part of 131st Division sabotaged traffic and signal communications between Chang-kung-tu [?] and Anyi, between Teh-an [De'an] and Juo-hsi [Ruoxi], and the rails and telegraph wires between Niu-hsing [Jiaoqiao] and Lo-hua [Lehuajie] and in the vicinity of Teh-an[De'an].

These attacks prompted the 33rd and 34th Division to send out forces to hunt these Chinese forces. One of them, the 213th Regiment of 33rd Division was attacked by the Chinese 78th Corps of 30th Army Group near Wu-ning [Wuning] that pressed it back to Lao-ta-hsia in the south and Chapi-ao in the western end of the city. Meanwhile the 72nd Corps and 8th Corps of the 30th Army Group attacked the Japanese 40th Division at Hsin-tan-pu [Xintanpu, Hubei], Ta-fan [Dafan, Hubei], Tung-shan [Tongyang] and Nan-lin-chiao [Nanliqiao], and cut wires from Yang-hsien [Yangxin] to Tung-shan [Tongyang] and Pai-ni-chiao [Bainiqiao]. Later 72nd Corps took Hsin-tan-pu [Xintanpu], and Tze-kou Chen [?], and 8th Corps captured Ni-keng-kou [Xi-keng?] and Shih-hsia [?].

On December 14th the Japanese 33rd and 40th Divisions reaacted by sending two regiments to counterattack from Yu-chia-fan [Zhifang?], Lung-kang [?] and Ta-fan [Dafan], fighting against the 72nd and 8th Corps in the area from Shih-men [?] to Shih-pi-hu [?]. By the 19th the Japanese were driven back and the Chinese continued to attack Hsin-tan-pu [?], Tung-shan [Tongyang], and Nan-lin-chao [Nanliqiao]. The 3rd Division cut the rails and telegraph wires at Ting-sze-chiao [Tingsiqiao].

1st Advance Column sabatoged rails and telegraph wires at Shan-po [Shanpo], Ho-cheng-chiao [Heshengqiao], and Tao-lin-pu [?] along the Canton - Hankow Railway. 3rd Advance Column sabatoged rails and telegraph wires from Li-ho-nan [Lehua] to Ta-chiao [?] on the Nan - Hsun Railway and signal communicantons in the area of Wang-chia-pu [Wangjiapu] on the Jui-Wu [Jui-chang-Wuning] Highway.

On December 12th after recovering Chung-yang [Chongyang], the 20th Corps of the 27th Army Group telegraph wires along the highways from Pai-ni-chiao [Bainiqiao], to Chung-yang [Chungyang] and Yang-lo-tung [Yanglodong] and between Chung-yang [Chongyang] and Shih-cheng-wan [Shichengwan]. It also drove off enemy reinforcements in the area of Wu-li-miao [?], Ta-shih-ling [Tiancheng?] and Kuei-hua-shu [Guihuashu]. From December 13th the 70th Corps 3rd and 19th Divisions attacked Chung-yang [Chongyang], Kuei-hua-shu [Guihuashu], and Shih-cheng-wan [Shichengwan] areas clearing the Japaneses east of Kuei-hua-shu [Guihuashu], and captued localities on the outskirts of Shih-cheng-wan [Shichengwan]. On the night of January 8th 1940, the 70th Corps moved to Yang-lou-tung [Yangloudong], Pu-chi [Puqi] and Chao-li-chiao [Zhaoliqiao] to clear the enemy there, routing enemy reinforcements at Pai-hua-pu [?] and sabatoging the rails and telegraph wires at Ting-tse-chiao [Tingsiqiao], Kuan-tang-yi [Guantangyi] and Chung-huo-pu [Zhonghuopu].

82nd Division of the 79th Corps, 15th Army Group, cut the Canton-Hangkow Railway at Yang-lo-sze Station [Yanglousi], attacked Ta-sha-ping [Dashaping] and Tung-cheng [Tucheng], blew the bridge at Tieh-chu-kang [?]. In succession the 15th Army Group captured capture Chiu-kung-shan [Chiu-kung mountain?] and Wu-li-pai [Wulipai] on the outskirts of Yueh-yang [Yuehyang]. Then with with 116th Division, 53rd Corps from 6th War area 4th Corps attacked Lin-yueh [?], destroyed rails and telegraph wires from Wu-pa-li [Wulipai] to Yueh-yang [Yuehyang], then intercepted Japanese reinforcements at Ching-kang-yi [Chenglingji?], Tang-chia-pai [?] and Kun-shan [Kun mountain?] northwest of Tao-lin [Taolin], Wu-li-pai [Wulipai], and Yun-hsi [Yunxi]. 6th Divisions supply and liaison was so disrupted that it was effecively cut off.


5th War Area

On December 12th, the various armies of the 5th War area began the offensive against the Japanese. 32nd and 40th Divisions of the River North Army moving to Chien-chiang [Qianjiachang?] and Pai-lo-chi [?]. Meanwhile the 128th Division attacked Hsien-tao [Xiantao]. Once the 6th,13th and 41st Divions crossed the Han river they mopped up Japanese strong points west of the Yung-lung River. On the night of December 152th, the Chinese 4th Reserve Division crossed the Han river north of Shayang to take part in the operation. On December 16th the River North Army recovered the Japanese strong points at Nieh-chia-chang [?], Fu-nan-chang [?], Wu-hsu-chia-chang [?], Chou-chia-chang [?], Tung-hsin-chang [?], Tuo-chuan-fu [?] and Nan-ho-fu [?]. Fighting continued at Sze-kang [Shayang] and Kung-yi-chang [?].

At dawn of December 17th two Japanse columns attacked the Chinese at Hsien-tao [Xiantao] and Sze-kang [Shayang]. The first from Hsiang-chia-wan [?] and Lin-chia-chi [?] had more than 1,000 infantry of the 116th Regiment supported by 10 tanks and artillery. The second from Sze-kang [Shayang] had 1,000 troops and several tanks. Eventually the Chinese took Hsien-tao [Xiantao] and Sze-kang [Shayang], after engaging in a bitter fight.

On December 18th, Japanese 600 cavalry and infantry in more than 90 trucks advancing to the southwest via Wu-miao-chi [?]. They were intercepted in the area of Wang-wu-tai [?] and Han-ching-miao [?] cutting off their withdrawal route, however some managed to retreat to Tao-pao-wan [?].

On 22nd of December under cover of 8 aircraft a Japanese at Kung-yi-chang [?] attacked Chinese positions at Wang-wu-tai and Lo-chia-tang. The Chinese suffered heavy losses and the Japanese cleared the highway from Wang-wu-tai [?] to Tao-pao-wan [?]. Meanwhile the Japanease force at Lin-chia-chi increased to 2,000 men, more than 10 guns and 60 tanks and more Japanese troops appeared northeast of Chu-chia-chang and northwest of Tuo-chuan-fu [?].

Since the fighting had gone on for days with heavy loss to the Chinese they decided to avoid further loss and began to withdraw west of the Han river on the 23rd. 55th and 13th Division covered this withdrawal, holding the Japanese at Yen-men-kuan [Yen-men pass?]. The withdrawal was complete by the 31st of December. However some fighting contiued, on January 11th, a detachment of the 32nd Division ambushed a Japanese truck convoy between Chien-chiang [Qianjiachang?] and Yueh-kou [Yuekou], killing a colonel, and 50 enlisted men and capturing large amounts of military supplies. 13th Division attacked Japanese reinforcements on January 17th, 1940 at Yeh-chia-chi [?] and Lo-chia-chi [?].

On the front of the Right Flank Army on December 12th, 33rd Army Groups 74th Division crossed the river to attack the Japanese south of Chung-hsiang [Zhongxiang]. 77th and 59th Corps of the 33rd Army Group and the 29th Army Group separately crossed the Han River to capture Chu-pao-ta-chiao [?] and Hsi-hu-shan [?] and went on to attack Lo-chia-po[?], San-yan-tien [?], Wang-chia-pao [?] and Tan-fu-miao[?]. On December 13th they captured Ta-hsiao-chen-chung [?] and Chang-chia-wan [?]. On December 18th, Chinese forces fought several thousand Japanese troops at Wang-chia-ling [?] and San-yang-tien [?]. On December 19th, a converging attack was made in conjuction with 74th Division resulting in heavy loss to both sides, but on the 21st the Japanese withdrew to the south followed by the Chinese who attacked Tung-chiao [Dongqiao] and Huang-chia-chi [Huangjiaji] and strongpoints at Yang-tze [Yangzi] and Chung-hsiang [Zhongxiang].

On December 26th the Japanese force in the area of Chung-hsiang [Zhongxiang] was increased to 5,000 men with more than 10 guns and 20 tanks. At dawn the following day they made a strong attack along the entire front, advancing to Chang-shou-tien [Changshoudian] on the 28th. 84th Corps, the War Area reserve had to be thrown in to stop them. Meanwhile the 74th Division had reached Yeh-chia-pu [?] and Pai-miao-chang [?] to join forces with the 59th Corps in launching a flanking attack on the Japanese in the area of Hung-shih-po [?]. By December 31st the Chinese faced the Japanese on a line from Pu-men-chung [?] to the south of Chang-shou-tien [Changshoudian], Tan-chia-ta-shu [?] and Pai-miao-chang [?].

On January 5th, 1940, Wang-chia-tien [Wangdian] and the heights in front of the 29th Army group were captured by the Japanese but a counter attack by the 55th Division recovered them. From January 9-13th, the Japanese force at Huang-yang [?] was increased to three regiments and began attacks on the Right Flank Army. Japanese artillery at Yang-tze [Yangtzi] shelled the Chinese. On January 14th, Chinese forces made a night attack and took the high ground south of Kao-cheng [Gaocheng?] and Shih-ling-szu [?] and Wang-chia-tai [?], Sun-chia-tien [?] and Chu-chia-miao[?]. The Chinese claimed that six days of continuous attack led to 2,000 Japanese casualties and resulted in a stalemate on this front.

Left Flank Army (River East Army) attacked the Japanese in the area between Lo-yang-tien [Luoyangdian], to Hsu-chia-tien [Xudian]. Another force occupied Wu-li-pu [?] and Shih-li-pu [?] east of Sui Hsien [Suizhou], and also destroying communications between Sui Hsien [Suizhou], and Hsi-shui [?]. On December 15th, under Japanese preasure the left flank of the 22nd Army Group moved to the line from Chih-cheng-shan [Chih-cheng mountian?] to Chi-ku-tien [?] and Shan-ching-kuan [Shan-ching pass?]. On December 18th, Chinese forces continued their offensive and took Tze-pa-kang [?] and Chang-kang [Changlinggang?].

On December 28th, a portion of 22nd Army Group took Yun-tan-kang [?] southwest of Ma-ping [Maping], while the rest beat back attacks by Japanese reinforcements at Lo-yang-tien [Luoyangdian], Tze-pa-kang [?], Tu-chung-shan [Tu-chung mountain?] and Hsu-chia-tien [Xudian].

On December 12th, the Southern Honan Army launched their offensive, capturing Chuan-kou-tien [?], Chiang-hsi-tien [?], and Yang-liu-ho [?] on the 13th. Attacks on Hua-shan [Hua mountain?], Ping-ching-kuan [Pingchangguan] and Feng-chia-chuang [?] continued. On the 15th the Japanese recovered Yang-liu-ho [?], while the 30th and 68th Corps pressed the Japanese at Lo-tuo-tien [Luotuodian], Yu-ho [Youhe?] and Chang-tai-kuan [Changtaiguan] and sent detachments to sabotage communications between those strongpoints and Hsin-yang [Xinyang].

A Japanese force moving north from west of Chang-tai-kuan [Changtaiguan], was driven back at Mu-chu-ho [Muzihe?]. On the night of December 22nd, two Chinese regiments separately advanced toward the northeast and southwest of Hsin-yang [Xinyang] to attack the enemy forces there. On the 26th the 27th Division was also employed in the attack on Hsin-yang [Xinyang]. Again on the 27th of December the Chinese repulsed Japanese reinforcements at Hua-shan [Hua mountain?] and Ping-ching-kuan [Pingchangguan].

On January 5th, 1940, more than 2,000 Japanese infantry and artillery troops moved from Chang-tai-kuan [ ] to attack 68th Corps. The left flank of the Chinese 30th Corps employed two regiments east of Ping-chang-kuan [Pingchangguan] against 2,000 Japanese troops. Later, the 68th Corps withdrew to the rear, exposing the flank of the 30th Corps and bitter fighting ensued at Hsiao-lin-tien and Kung-chia-fan. 85th Corps from 31st Army Group was committed to the fight enabling the repulse of the Japanese force on the 9th of January, and contiune the advance toward Yu-fang-wan [?], Wu-chia-tien [Wujiadien] and Ping-chang-kuan [Pingchangguan] to mop up the remaining Japanese forces.

To exploit this success the high command committed the balance of the 31st Army Group, from the Northern Hupei Army. Its main force was ordered to launch an attack from the Kao-cheng [Gaocheng], Yen-tze-ho[Yanzihe] area and attack the area of Hua-yuan [Huayuan] and Kuang-shui[Guangshui] by January 1st, 1940. On the 5th it attacked Japanese units at Hsu-chia-tien [Haodian], Yu-chia-tien [Wujiadian?], Hua-shan [Hua mountian?], Ta-miao-fan [?] and Ping-ching-kuan [Pingchangguan]. Later, the 23rd Division (85th Corps?) advanced to the area between Wu-sheng-kuan [Wu-sheng pass?] and Kuang-shui [Guangshui]. On January 7th, 4th Division (85th Corps?) recovered Hua-shan [Hua mountian?],]. On January 17th, the 4th, 21st and 141st Divisions engaged the Japanese at Wan-chia-tien [Wujiadian], Chien-ting-miao [?], Lo-han-ting [?], and Hua-shan [Hua mountain?].

On January 22nd, the Japanese and Chinese forces fought at Chiang-chia-ho [?], Pi-chia-shan [Pi-chia mountain], Ku-sao-ling [?], Chih-shan-ai [?], Yin-chia-tien [?]. Days of fighting at Hsiao-chia-wan [?], Tu-men-chung [?], Shih-men [?] and Kao-cheng [Gaocheng], ended in the destruction of several thousand enemy troops, more than 10 tanks and large quantities of supplies.

Meanwhile the Eastern Hupei Guerrilla force repeatedly attacked enemy strong points in eastern and western Anhwei, and employed its main force in attacks in the area of Huang-an [Huang'an], Ho-kou [Hekou], and Hsia-tien [Xiadian].


Results of the Central China Offensive

3rd War Area attacked 116th Division positions along the south bank of the Yangtze River, cutting communications and attacking traffic along the Yangtze River to prevent the forces of the 13th Army from giving aid to the 11th Army up river. Although it failed to take the major riverside towns that were some of its objectives it seems to have succeaded in tying up the local Japanese forces and harrassing river traffic. How much it affectied traffic on the river is not stated but 13th Army doesn't seem to have sent forces up river to 11th Army during the time of the offensive. Its Hangchow offensive seems to have been somewhat successful but the Japanese seemed to have replied with a counter offensive of their own.

9th War Area with the support of the 3rd and 6th War Areas was to attack the 6th, 33rd, 34th and 40th Divisions, and 14th and 18th Independent Mixed Brigade of the Japanese 11th Army south of the Yangtze along the Canton-Hangkow Railway at Puchi and Hsien-ning and 19th Army Group and 32nd Army Groups did attack Nanchang, and along the Nanchang-Kuikiang Railway. 27th Army Group did attack the Canton-Hangkow Railway at Puchi and Hsien-ning [Xianning] and 30th Army Group attacked between Nan-Hsun Railway and Canton-Hangkow Railway, and 15th Army Group supported by 53rd Corps from 6th War area attacked Canton-Hangkow Railway and isolated 6th division at Yueh-yang. However planed advance by 27th Army Group on Wu-chang, and 30th Army Group against Jui-chang and Kiu-kiang did not occur.

5th War Area had an ambitious goal to mop up the 3rd, 13th and 39th Divisions and 14th Independent Mixed Brigade of the 11th Army north of the Yangtze between Hsin-yang and Wuhan along the Peiking-Hankow Railway and cut communications along the Han-yi [Hankow-Ichang] and Hsiang-Hua [Hsiang-yang - Hua-yuan Highways. This it did not come near to achieving, due to the failure of its various Armies.

River North Army accomplished little and was driven back behind the river by December 23rd, probably freeing up 13th Division units for use elsewhere. The Japanese seem to have held Right Flank Army in the Chung-hsiang [Zhongxiang] area far from the planned stop line from Ching-shan [Xinshi] to Sung-ho [Songhe] and Ping-pa [Pingba]. The Japanese seem to have contained Left Flank Army or (River East Army) far from its final objectives. Southern Honan Army did attack the enemy 3rd Division in the area north of Ying-shan [Yingshan] and Hsi-shuang-ho [Xishuanghe] and send a strong force to cut enemy lines of communications in the area of Kuang-shui [Guangshui] and Hsin-yang [Xinyang]. Its main force was to attack in the area of Hsin-yang [Xinyang] and occupy it. Neither of these objectives was achieved dispite the commitment of the 31st Army Group. Eastern Hupei Guerrilla force did not advance to the enemy rear areas at Kuang-shui [Guangshui], Hua-yuan [Huayuan] and Hankow to check enemy movement along the railroad they never got near the those objectives, leaving the Japanese free to move troops along the rails to meet the other attacks.


Sources:
[1] Hsu Long-hsuen and Chang Ming-kai, History of The Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) 2nd Ed. ,1971. Translated by Wen Ha-hsiung , Chung Wu Publishing; 33, 140th Lane, Tung-hwa Street, Taipei, Taiwan Republic of China.

Page 319-334 Chinese Winter Offensive (Late Nov 1939 - Late March 1940)
Map 19

[2] IJA in China orbat, 1937 to 1945
http://www.china-defense.com/forum/show ... php?t=1168

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Lower Hun river

Post by tigre » 02 Jul 2006 00:25

So long, folks. Great job asiaticus, congratulations. Here goes something more (just a bit)

The great Far Eastern conflict has entered into its fourth year and the military deadlock which has prevailed for some time still continues, with no substantial gains on either side. Excepting a few minor operations, the last year of the ‘World forgotten Wars" has yielded no impressive military results comparable to the sweeping Japanese advances of 1937 and 1938. At present, Japan’s army seems to be ‘bogged down" in China.

Japan, due to the European War, has acquired more freedom of action in China lately and is endeavoring to bring tie enemy to terms by cutting off all possible lines of supplies, having failed to gain a decisive victory on the battlefield.

Early in June of this year, about 15,000 Japanese troops advanced across the lower Hun river near Shayang and on 8 June occupied the Yangtze River port of Shasi.

This force then began a drive westwards and on 11 June occupied the important Yangtze river port of Ichang, some 260 miles from Chungking—China’s third wartime capital—as the crow flies. The strategical importance of Ichang is obvious. Situated at the outlet of the Yangtze river, its occupation blocks the principal communication from Szechwan Province and leaves practically no supply route across the mountains from the upper Han river to the North and Chenchou in west Hunnan Province, a distance of over 300 miles. Control of the Yangtze river as far as Ichang effectively splits the Chinese forces in Central China into two groups, cooperation between which becomes practically, impossible.

Meanwhile, Japanese warplanes have continued their raids over Chungking and Szechwan towns causing considerable casualties and damage to property. On the other hand, Chinese guerrillas have been reported active in practically all provinces of occupied China and even Shanghai was the scene of a raid last July.

The fall of Canton in october 1938, deprived China of her last important Port of entry for war material from ,broad and made her more dependent than ever upon her three life-lines: The Indo-China route. the Soviet Route (old silk Road) and the Burma Road.

Taking advantage of the French collapse, pressure was put on the French authorities to stop all shipments of arms and supplies over the Indo-Chinese railway, which runs from Haiphong into Yunnan Province. This was promptly followed by the dispatch of a Japanese naval squadron to Haiphong, to enforce the blockade of that harbor; while Japanese army officers would act as inspectors in order to prevent shipment of supplies to China.

Source: The Sine-Japanese War. BY LIEUTENANT COLONEL E. M. BENITEZ, Coast Artillery Corps. Military Review, Vol XX Nº 78.

More follows. Regards. Tigre.
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Tsaoyang-Yichang Campaign Eary May - Late June 1940

Post by asiaticus » 02 Jul 2006 06:40

Tsaoyang-Yichang Campaign (Eary May - Late June 1940)

Japan

11th Army - Lt. General Katsuichiro Enbu
- 3rd Division - General Masataka Yamawaki
--5th Infantry Brigade
--- 6th Infantry Regiment
--- 68th Infantry Regiment
--29th Infantry Brigade
--- 18th Infantry Regiment
--- 34th Infantry Regiment
-- 3rd Field Artillery Regiment
-- 3rd Cavalry Regiment
-- 3rd Engineer Regiment
-- 3rd Transport Regiment

- 4th Division - Lieutenant-General Kenzo Kitano (from Manchuria, May-June 1940)
-- 7th Infantry Brigade
--- 8th Infantry Regiment
--- 70th Infantry Regiment
-- 32nd Infantry Brigade
--- 37th Infantry Regiment
--- 61st Infantry Regiment
-- 4th Field Artillery Regiment
-- 4th Reconnaissance Regiment
-- 4th Engineer Regiment
-- 4th Transport Regiment

- 13th Division - General Shizuichi Tanaka [4]
--26th Infantry Brigade
---58th Infantry Regiment
---116th Infantry Regiment
--103rd Infantry Brigade
---65th Infantry Regiment
---104th Infantry Regiment
--19th Mountain Artilley Regiment
--17th Cavalry Regiment
--13th Engineer Regiment

- 39th Division - Lt Gen. Keisaku Murakami [4]
-- 39th Infantry Brigade Group:
--- 231st Infantry regiment
--- 232nd Infantry regiment
--- 233rd Infantry regiment
--. 39th Redon regiment,
-- 39th feild artillery regiment
-- 39th military engineer regiment
-- 39th transport regiment

- 6th Division (partial) - Major-General Norimoto Kitano [1,4]
--9th Infantry Brigade
---11th Infantry Regiment
---41st Infantry Regiment
--21st Infantry Brigade
---21st Infantry Regiment
---42nd Infantry Regiment
--5th Mountain Artillery Regiment
--5th Cavalry Regiment
--5th Engineer Regiment
--5th Transport Regiment

- 40th Division (partial) - Lt. Gen Naojikiro Amaya [2,4]
-- 40th Infantry Brigade group:
--- 234th Infantry regiment
--- 235th Infantry regiment
--- 236th Infantry regiment
-- 40th Cavalry regiment
-- 40th mountain artillery regiment
-- 40th military engineer regiment
-- 40th Transport regiment

- 20th Separate Brigade- ? [1]
Could not be 20th Independent Mixed Brigade because it was formed in November, 1940 in Shanghai, on December 6 enrolled the 11th armed force order of battle. Thus it was formed too late to participate in this campaign. This more likely would be 14th IMB that was part of 11th Army at this time.

- 14th Independent Mixed Brigade - ? [2]
-- 61st Independent infantry battalion
-- 62nd Independent infantry battalion
-- 63rd Independent infantry battalion
-- 64th Independent infantry battalion
-- 65th Independent infantry battalion
-- Brigade artillery troops
-- Brigade engineer unit
-- Brigade communication unit

- 18th Independent Mixed Brigade - Major-General Koichi Kayashima [2,4]
-- 92nd Independent infantry battalion
-- 93rd Independent infantry battalion
-- 94th Independent infantry battalion
-- 95th Independent infantry battalion
-- 96th Independent infantry battalion
-- Brigade artillery troops
-- Brigade engineer unit
-- Brigade communication unit


Airforce: [3]

3rd Hikodan - Major General Kuwana
- headquarters in Hankou
At Hankou airfield:
-- 17th Dokuritsu Hiko Chutai [Reconnaissance squadron.]
-- 44th Sentai (one reconnaissance and two direct cooperation units)
-- 59th Sentai
--- 1st Chutai Nakajima Ki-27
--- 2nd Chutai Nakajima Ki-27
At Wuchang airfield:
-- 11th Sentai (less one chutai)
--- 2nd Chutai Nakajima Ki-27
--- 3rd Chutai Nakajima Ki-27
-- 75th Sentai [Light bomber unit]
3rd Hikodan was directed to cooperate with the land operations of the 11th Army and suppress the Chinese air force.



China (Mid April 1940)

5th War Area - Li Tsung-jen

- 2nd Army Group - Sun Lien-chung
-- 68th Corps - Liu Ju-ming
--- 119th Division
--- 143rd Division
--- 27th Seperate Brigade
-- 30th Corps - Wang Chung-lien
--- 27th Division
--- 30th Division
--- 31st Division

- 31st Army Group - Tang En-po
-- 13th Corps - Chang Hsueh-chung
--- 89th Division
--- 110th Division
--- 11th Seperate Brigade
-- 85th Corps - Wang Chung-lien
--- 4th Division
--- 32nd Division
--- 11th Seperate Brigade
- 11th Army Group - Huang Chi-hsiang
-- 92nd Corps - Li Hsien-chao
--- 21st Division
--- 47th Division
-- 84th Corps - Mo Shu-chieh
--- 178th Division
--- 188th Division
- 29th Army Group - Wang Tsan-hsu
-- 44th Corps - Liao Chen
--- 149th Division
--- 150th Division
-- 67th Corps - Hsu Shao-tsung
--- 161st Division
--- 162nd Division
- 22nd Army Group - Sun Chen
-- 45th Corps - Chen Ting-hsun
--- 125th Division
--- 127th Division
-- 41st Corps - Sun Chen
--- 122nd Division
--- 124th Division
-- 1st Guerilla Division
- 33rd Army Group - Chang Tze-chung
-- 55th Corps - Tsao Fu-lin
--- 29th Division
--- 74th Division
-- 77th Corps - Feng Chih-an
--- 37th Division
--- 132nd Division
--- 179th Division
-- 59th Corps - Huang Wei-kang
--- 38th Division
--- 180th Division
--- 9th Cavalry Division
- 75th Corps - Chao Ai
--- 6th Division
--- 13th Division
--- 4th Cavalry Division
- 39th Corps - Liu Ho-ting
-- 56th Division
- River Defense Force - Kuo Chan
-- 94th Corps - Li Chi-lan
--- 12th Division
--- 185th Division
--- 55th Division
-- 26th Corps - Hsiao Chih-chu
--- 23rd Division
--- 41st Division
--- 44th Division
- 2nd Corps - Li Yen-nien
-- 76th Division
-- 33rd Division
- New 12th Corps - Cheng Tung-kuo
-- 1st Honor Division
-- 5th Division
- 18th Corps - Peng Shan
-- 18th Division
-- 77th Division
-- 199th Division
- Eastern Hupei Guerilla Force
-- 7th Corps - Wang Tsan-pin
--- 171st Guerilla Division
--- 172nd Guerilla Division
--- 3rd Guerilla Division
--- 4th Guerilla Division
-- Commander Cheng Ju-hai
--- 16th Guerilla Division
--- 19th Guerilla Division
--- 11th Guerilla Regiment


Sources:
[1] Hsu Long-hsuen and Chang Ming-kai, History of The Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) 2nd Ed. ,1971. Translated by Wen Ha-hsiung , Chung Wu Publishing; 33, 140th Lane, Tung-hwa Street, Taipei, Taiwan Republic of China.

Page 334-339
Map 20, 21

[2] IJA in China orbat, 1937 to 1945
http://www.china-defense.com/forum/show ... php?t=1168

[3] Sino-Japanese Air War 1937 – 1945
http://surfcity.kund.dalnet.se/sino-japanese.htm

[4] Generals from Japan (WWII)
http://www.generals.dk/nation/Japan/S.html

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Map of Tsaoyang-Yichang Campaign

Post by asiaticus » 02 Jul 2006 06:45

Tsaoyang-Yichang Campaign map 21 from ] Hsu Long-hsuen and Chang Ming-kai, History of The Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) 2nd Ed. ,1971. Translated by Wen Ha-hsiung , Chung Wu Publishing; 33, 140th Lane, Tung-hwa Street, Taipei, Taiwan Republic of China.
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Re: Tsaoyang-Yichang Campaign Eary May - Late June 1940

Post by Akira Takizawa » 02 Jul 2006 08:34

11th Army - Lt. General Waichiro Sonobe

-4th Division - It did not participate in the campaign. The Japanese shown as 4th Division on above map was really Ikeda Detachment.

-6th Division (partial) - Lt. Gen. Machijiri

From 6th Division, Ikeda Detachment commanded by Major Gen. Naomi Ikeda participated in the campaign. The core of the detachment was the 11th Infantry Brigade.

- 20th Separate Brigade- ? [1]

I don't know what it means. But, following detachments participated in the campaign.

Ogawa Detachment - Col. Ogawa (216th Infantry Regiment)
Yoshida Detachmet - Col. Yoshida
101st Mixed Brigade - Major General Matsuyama

Reinforced from 13th Army
Kurahashi Detachment - Col. Kurahashi (60th Infantry Regiment)
Matsui Detachment - Major General Matsui (22nd Infnatry Group)
Kansui(漢水) Detachment - Col. Higaki (17th Anchorage HQ)

- 14th Independent Mixed Brigade- Major-General Takahide Todo

3rd Hikodan - Major General Saburo Endo


Taki
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Re: Tsaoyang-Yichang Campaign

Post by asiaticus » 02 Jul 2006 19:57

Thanks for the map and the corrections Taki.

Some questions an comments:
11th Army - Lt. General Waichiro Sonobe
Odd. I found 11th Army commander listed as Lt. General Katsuichiro Enbu (9 Mar 1940 - 10 Apr 1941)
on the Axis History website: http://www.axishistory.com/index.php?id=6922
and Generals from Japan (WWII) http://www.generals.dk/nation/Japan/S.html

Maybe they need correction. This command listing of Waichiro Sonobe is from the official Japanese history or elsewhere?
Any idea of the dates his command began and ended?
-4th Division - It did not participate in the campaign. The Japanese shown as 4th Division on above map was really Ikeda Detachment.
My info is that 4th Division joined 11th Army July 1st, 1940. That is what my copy of the IJA Orbat in China says. I was thinking a part of the division might have turned up a little earlier because in the text in the Chinese history it is mentioned as being only a part of it and arriving late in the campaign and only attacking toward Ichang in company with the 18th IMB.

Perhaps that part of 4th Divison might be this Yoshida Detachment or was that from some other unit maybe the detachment of 40th Divison?

Was Yoshida Detachment operating with the Ikeda Detachment attacking toward Ichang as you mention or was it with the 3rd Divison up north?
-6th Division (partial) - Lt. Gen. Machijiri
Thanks must have overlooked checking on this one:
Lieutenant-General Kazumoto Machijiri Viscount (1889-1950)
1939 - 1941 General Officer Commanding 6th Division
From 6th Division, Ikeda Detachment commanded by Major Gen. Naomi Ikeda participated in the campaign. The core of the detachment was the 11th Infantry Brigade.
Thanks. I wondered which brigade was sent. Any idea what other supporting divisional units were tagged on to this Detachement?

I see I put down the wrong list of sub units for 6th Divison. Should be
--11th Infantry Brigade
---13th Infantry Regiment
---47th Infantry Regiment
--36th Infantry Brigade
---23rd Infantry Regiment
---45th Infantry Regiment
-- Field Artillery Regiment
-- 6th Cavalry Regiment
-- 6th Engineer Regiment
-- 6th Transport Regiment

- 20th Separate Brigade- ? [1]
I don't know what it means.
The Chinese history uses that Separate Brigade term for the Independant Mixed Brigades.
But, following detachments participated in the campaign.

Ogawa Detachment - Col. Ogawa (216th Infantry Regiment)
From 34th Division
Yoshida Detachmet - Col. Yoshida
What composed this unit? Maybe part of 4th Division or 40th Divison?
101st Mixed Brigade - Major General Matsuyama
Was this a Independant Mixed Brigade or a detachment of the 101st Division?
My info is that the 10st Division was sent back to Japan in November 1939. Was this brigade held over?
Reinforced from 13th Army
Kurahashi Detachment - Col. Kurahashi (60th Infantry Regiment)
This is from 15th Divison.
Matsui Detachment - Major General Matsui (22nd Infantry Group)
Was this the infantry brigade group from the 22nd Division? If so how many of its 3 infantry regiments (and other units) came along?
Kansui(漢水) Detachment - Col. Higaki (17th Anchorage HQ)
What is this type of unit?

Do you know what roles these detachments had in the campaign?

Another thing that I am curious about is what Naval force was involved here? It would seem necessary to secure the length of the Yangze from Yueh Yang to Icheng. Any info on fleet assets involved here?
- 14th Independent Mixed Brigade- Major-General Takahide Todo
Thanks had no info on this one.
3rd Hikodan - Major General Saburo Endo
Any idea of his term of command?

Sino-Japanese Air War 1937 – 1945
http://surfcity.kund.dalnet.se/sino-japanese-1940.htm

has it as
3rd Hikoshidan - Lieutenant General Kinoshita (Nanking)
- 1st Hikodan - Major General Nakazono (Peiking)
- 3rd Hikodan - Major General Kuwana (Hankow)

It may be Hakan needs to correct his site. Is the 3rd Hikodan command listing from the official Japanese history or elsewhere?

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Post by Akira Takizawa » 03 Jul 2006 04:02

> 11th Army - Lt. General Waichiro Sonobe
> Odd. I found 11th Army commander listed as Lt. General Katsuichiro Enbu (9 Mar 1940 - 10 Apr 1941)

"Katsuichiro Enbu" is a mistranslation. "Waichiro Sonobe" is a correct reading of his name.

> Any idea of the dates his command began and ended?

9 Mar 1940 - 10 Apr 1941

> Perhaps that part of 4th Divison might be this Yoshida Detachment or was that from some other unit maybe the detachment of 40th Divison?

No

> Was Yoshida Detachment operating with the Ikeda Detachment attacking toward Ichang as you mention or was it with the 3rd Divison up north?

I don't know.

> Thanks. I wondered which brigade was sent. Any idea what other supporting divisional units were tagged on to this Detachement?

Ikeda Detachment
13th Infantry Regiment
One battalion each from 47th, 23rd, 45th Infantry Regiments
One battalion of 2nd Independent Mountain Gun Regiment
One platoon of 6th Cavalry Regiment
One company of 6th Engineer Regiment
Two companies of 6th Transport Regiment

> Yoshida Detachmet - Col. Yoshida
> What composed this unit? Maybe part of 4th Division or 40th Divison?

It consisted of 61st Infantry Battalion, guard unit from 13th Division and other support units. I don't know what unit 61st Infantry Battalion was.

> 101st Mixed Brigade - Major General Matsuyama
> Was this a Independant Mixed Brigade or a detachment of the 101st Division?

It was a temporary brigade locally formed. It consisted of China Stationed Infantry Battalion, 26th IIB and other support units.

> Matsui Detachment - Major General Matsui (22nd Infantry Group)
> Was this the infantry brigade group from the 22nd Division?

He was the commander of 22nd Infantry Group. But, the troops of Matsui detachment were gathered from some different divisions.

> If so how many of its 3 infantry regiments (and other units) came along?

It had three infantry battalions extracted from 15th, 17th and 22nd Divisions. It is unknown from which regiments they came.

> Kansui(漢水) Detachment - Col. Higaki (17th Anchorage HQ)
> What is this type of unit?

It is a shipping force. The OOB of Kansui Detachment is as follows.

17th Anchorage HQ
6th Reserve Battalion of Imperial Guard Division
6th Independent Engineer Regiment
1st Company of 10th Independent Engineer Regiment
Five Surface Transport Units
Construction Transport Unit
9th Transport Supervision Unit

> Do you know what roles these detachments had in the campaign?

Kansui Deachment attacked together with Ikeda Detachment. I don't know the operations of other detachments.

> Another thing that I am curious about is what Naval force was involved here? It would seem necessary to secure the length of the Yangze from Yueh Yang to Icheng. Any info on fleet assets involved here?

1st China Expeditionary Fleet participated in the campaign. But, I don't know the details.

> 3rd Hikodan - Major General Saburo Endo
> Any idea of his term of command?

11th, 59th, 60th, 44th, 75th Sentai's
One squadron of 15th Sentai
One squadron of 90th Sentai
17th Independent Squadron

Correction:
The commander of 3rd Hikodan was Major General Kuwana. Endo succeeded to him in Aug.

Sino-Japanese Air War 1937 ? 1945
http://surfcity.kund.dalnet.se/sino-japanese-1940.htm

has it as
3rd Hikoshidan - Lieutenant General Kinoshita (Nanking)
- 1st Hikodan - Major General Nakazono (Peiking)
- 3rd Hikodan - Major General Kuwana (Hankow)

It may be Hakan needs to correct his site. Is the 3rd Hikodan command listing from the official Japanese history or elsewhere?
Stated above. The term of Hikoshidan(Air Division) was used since 1942. Before then, it was called Hikoshudan(Air Group).


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Last edited by Akira Takizawa on 03 Jul 2006 08:48, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Tsaoyang-Yichang Campaign

Post by asiaticus » 03 Jul 2006 07:58

So the forces for the Tsaoyang-Yichang Campaign would seem to be:

11th Army
Northern Pincer
- 3rd Divison

Central Force
-39th Divison

Southern Pincer
- 13th Divison

Ichang Column
- Ikeda Detachment - Major Gen. Naomi Ikeda / 6th Division
--13th Infantry Regiment
-- One battalion each from 47th, 23rd, 45th Infantry Regiments / 6th Div.
-- One battalion of 2nd Independent Mountain Gun Regiment
-- One platoon of 6th Cavalry Regiment
-- One company of 6th Engineer Regiment
-- Two companies of 6th Transport Regiment
- Kansui(漢水) Detachment - Col. Higaki (17th Anchorage HQ)

The rest if not part of the attacking force maybe are security forces to replace the missing Divisions forces garrisoning the Hankow - Xinyang region and hold the new communication lines to the west perhaps?

From South of the Yangtze
- 14th IMB from Juijiang area

--Yoshida Detachmet - Col. Yoshida
--- 61st Battalion / this is probably a Battalion of the 14th IMB

- 18th IMB from Wuning according to Hsu Long-hsuen

- Ogawa Detachment - Col. Ogawa
-- 216th Infantry Regiment / 34th Division from the Nanchang area

from North China ?
101st Mixed Brigade - Major General Matsuyama
- China Stationed Infantry Battalion / from 27th Division was garrisoning the Tianjin area
- 26th Independent Infantry Battalion / from 7th IMB which was garrisoning the Huimin area

Reinforced from 13th Army:
Kurahashi Detachment - Col. Kurahashi
- 60th Infantry Regiment / 15th Division in the Nanchang area

Matsui Detachment - Major General Matsui
- 22nd Infantry Group / from 22nd Division in the Hangchow area
--- 3 Battalions

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Re: Tsaoyang-Yichang Campaign

Post by Akira Takizawa » 03 Jul 2006 08:59

> The rest if not part of the attacking force maybe are security forces to replace the missing Divisions forces garrisoning the Hankow - Xinyang region and hold the new communication lines to the west perhaps?

They were not mentioned in the attacks of the campaign. So, they would be used in the rear.

> from North China ?
> 101st Mixed Brigade - Major General Matsuyama

Gen. Matsuyama was the commander of 27th Division's Infantry Group. Apparently, it was formed in North China.


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Tsaoyang-Yichang Campaign and North China 1940

Post by asiaticus » 03 Jul 2006 17:58

> from North China ?
> 101st Mixed Brigade - Major General Matsuyama

Gen. Matsuyama was the commander of 27th Division's Infantry Group. Apparently, it was formed in North China.
Taki, thanks for that info. Interesting, the 27th Division and 7th IMB areas were ones that didnt see much action in that Chinese Winter Offensive in the previous months. They must have been the ones that North China could spare for loaning for offensive purposes in Central China. If that is all they could send, the North China Army must have had their hands full up north.

What were the Japanese doing up there in 1940 prior to August, besides the Suiyuan conflict? I know in August to December the 100 Regiments offensive by the Communists was going on. Hsu Long-hsuen doesnt mention anything going on up there during 1940 except for the Winter Offensive at the begining. I would imagine the Japanese had to be busy running off the GMT Chinese from their communication routes and restoring them.

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Re: Tsaoyang-Yichang Campaign and North China 1940

Post by Akira Takizawa » 04 Jul 2006 01:50

asiaticus wrote:What were the Japanese doing up there in 1940 prior to August, besides the Suiyuan conflict?
Some small operations were carried out in North China. I don't know how they are called in the West, so I write them in Japanese names.

2/18-2/21 魯東作戦 (Shandong Operation)
4/11-5/31 冀中作戦 (Central Hepei Operation)
4/17-5/8 春季普南作戦 (Spring South Shanhsi Operation)
6/20-7/9 西北山西作戦 (North-West Shanhsi Operation)


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North China 1940

Post by asiaticus » 04 Jul 2006 05:03

Some small operations were carried out in North China. I don't know how they are called in the West, so I write them in Japanese names.

2/18-2/21 魯東作戦 (Shandong Operation)
4/11-5/31 冀中作戦 (Central Hepei Operation)
4/17-5/8 春季普南作戦 (Spring South Shanhsi Operation)
6/20-7/9 西北山西作戦 (North-West Shanhsi Operation)
Thanks Taki

These look like the kind of operations that I was expecting to see.

Looks like they did a quick knockout of the Shandong guerilla attacks on the railroad to Central China.
That would have allowed troops from the North to get to Central China in time for that Icheng operaton.

Central Hepei Operation and Spring South Shanhsi Operation look like the ones to roll back the 1st and 2nd and Hopei-Chahar War Area attacks.

North-West Shanhsi Operation I am curious what this would be.


Any details on these operations activity and results?

Units involved?

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Re: North China 1940

Post by Akira Takizawa » 04 Jul 2006 06:54

> Looks like they did a quick knockout of the Shandong guerilla attacks on the railroad to Central China.

It is a mop-up operation on Shandong Peninsula. 21st and 32nd Divisions and 5th IMB advanced through the peninsula from Feb. 7th. NLFs from 3rd China Expeditionary Fleet landed at the end of the peninsula on Feb. 18th. They occupied the peninsula around until Feb. 21st.

> Any details on these operations activity and results?
> Units involved?

No detailed information about other operations.


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Re: North China 1940

Post by asiaticus » 04 Jul 2006 19:49

It is a mop-up operation on Shandong Peninsula. 21st and 32nd Divisions and 5th IMB advanced through the peninsula from Feb. 7th. NLFs from 3rd China Expeditionary Fleet landed at the end of the peninsula on Feb. 18th. They occupied the peninsula around until Feb. 21st
Hmm interesting. I wonder how effective it was.

No detailed information about other operations.
Too bad. It would be nice to find out the details on those.

Where there any operations along those lines in Central or South China?

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