The Sino-Japanese War(Campaigns in detail)

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asiaticus
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Re: Yung Chien / Asuka

Post by asiaticus » 26 Apr 2006 18:13

Ran across this about Yung Chien / Asuka:

Yung Chien-class Chinese gunboats:
- Yung Chien [launched 1915, 1938 Japanese depot ship Asuka]

- Yung Chi [launched 1915, 1940 Nanking-navy Hai Hsing, 1945 Chinese Yung Chi]

http://picpage7.tripod.com/newquest.html

So Asuka was a gunboat that became a depot ship after it was raised which seems logical for its location with a Base Force in the Nanchang campaign.

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Specifications and drawing of Asuka

Post by asiaticus » 27 Apr 2006 06:06

Specifications and drawing of Asuka posted by Ed Low on:

http://www.j-aircraft.org/smf/index.php?topic=861.0

Presumably the Yung Chi was armed like the Yung Chien.

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Re: about Nanchang oob

Post by Akira Takizawa » 27 Apr 2006 08:38

> Was wondering where the 1st Base Force was located. I am guessing Kiukiang.

It was formed at Shanghai in 1937. But, it is unknown where it located at that time.

> Was wondering if the Ishii Tank Unit had other supporting units attached to it?

2nd Battalion of 147th Infantry Regiment
1st Company of 3rd Independent Engineer Regiment
1 Platoon of 8th Divisional Transport Unit


> I would guess they might be with the 106th Divison given the sweep south of Nanchang that the 106th is shown doing on the map above.

It advanced as shown on the below map.

Taki
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Re: about Nanchang oob

Post by asiaticus » 27 Apr 2006 19:43

Taki, thanks for list of units and the map. The map shows the Japanese movements better than the Chinese maps above.

Looks like Ishii Tank Unit accompanied the breakthru of the 106th Division and then drove into the rear of the Chinese defending the Rail line supporting the advance of the 101st Division while the 106th moved on to envelop Nanchang to the south on its own.

From your map it would seem the 1st Base Force might be located at Hukou on the Yangtze at the entrance to Po-yang Lake. Hsu Long-hsuen mentions in his account that the Japanse organized the operation from there.

By the way it looks like the navy operation also captured a locaton on the east side of the lake on the way. What is that place?

Looking at a contemporary map I cant figure out if its Liufang or Gaojiaqiao which both seem to be in that area.

Also was wondering if you know if the 8th Divisional Transport Unit was a detachment from the 8th Division or an independant transport unit?

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Re: about Nanchang oob

Post by Akira Takizawa » 28 Apr 2006 08:27

> By the way it looks like the navy operation also captured a locaton on the east side of the lake on the way. What is that place?

It is not navy, but 106th Division. They captured the east bank to secure the waterway early in March.

> Looking at a contemporary map I cant figure out if its Liufang or Gaojiaqiao which both seem to be in that area.

It is Mt. Chujia.

> Also was wondering if you know if the 8th Divisional Transport Unit was a detachment from the 8th Division or an independant transport unit?

It is a transport unit of line-of-communication unit under the 8th Division.

Taki

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Re: about Nanchang oob

Post by asiaticus » 28 Apr 2006 17:46

Taki, thanks for the clarifications.

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Nanchang topo map

Post by asiaticus » 04 May 2006 16:02

Here is an idea of the topography of the Nanchang campaingn using the Expedia map maker. Contemporary map shows the Xiushui River seems to have been dammed just west of the Japanese crossing point.


Mt. Chujia seems to be just south of Gaojiaqiao .
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Windward
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Post by Windward » 05 May 2006 16:43

Yung Chieng 永建 was built in Kiangnan Dockyard, Shanghai, in 1911. The 1912 revolution delayed its construction work so it's not completed until 1917.

Image

Image

Displacement: 860 tons
Length: 205ft
Width: 29.6ft
Draught: 12.5ft
Machinery: 2 boilers, 2 triple Expansion Engines, 1350ihp. 2 shaft
Speed: 13kt
Crew: 19 officers, 121 sailors

Armament: 4" gun x1 (bow); 3" gun x1 (stern); Armstrong 47mm QF x4; 40mm gun x1; 37mm gun x2; 8mm MG x1 (as completed)

captured by northern warlords after launch, transfered to Nationalist government in the 1930s. Under repair when Sino-Chinse war broke out and was bombed by IJN airplanes in Kiangnan Dockyard, on Aug 25 1937, and sunk. Was captured on Nov 18, raised by Japanese technicians and repaired. Acquired by IJN on Oct 15 1938 and renamed "Asuka". Reclassified as torpedoboat depot ship. Sunk again in Feb 1939, perhaps because of Chinese labors' resistance. Activities saw on Yangtze River, Tsingtao, Port Arthur and Amoi. Sunk British gunboat HMS Petrel together with IJN Izumo, Seta and Atami. Bombed by US B-29s (?) on May 7 1945, on the mouth of Hwangpu River, Shanghai, run aground and heavily damaged. Scrapped after the war.

Sister ship Yung Chi 永績 was bombed on July 21 1938 and sunk in shallow water in Hubei Province, captured by IJA, then transfered to Nanking government (puppet) as its flagship, renamed 海興 Hai Xing or Hai Hsing. Surrender to Chungking government in 1945, name changed back, but sunk again by PLA gunfire on April 23 1949, during the "Yangtze Dash" of Chinese navy. Afloated and renamed "Yan'an" 延安 (capital of red China), served in PLAN, decommission in 1970.

from http://vm.rdb.nthu.edu.tw/cwm/ming/2112.html (a Taiwanese website)

regards
Last edited by Windward on 06 May 2006 05:09, edited 1 time in total.

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re: Yung Chieng/Asuka

Post by asiaticus » 05 May 2006 18:07

Windward.

Thanks for the referance to the site and the translation. These ships seem to have had 9 lives like a cat. :^)

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The Japanese blockade

Post by tigre » 06 May 2006 17:01

Hello asiaticus, this is what I've as per next action report about the Sino-Japanese War appeared in the Military News Around the World - sep 1939.

No important operations have been undertaken since the capture of Nanchang last March. All military efforts have been overshadowed by the British-Japanese crisis, which threatens the whole status of the Occidentals in the Far East.

On 14 June, Japanese troops began an armed blockade of the British and French concessions isolating more than 100,000 persons—of which several thousand are Occidentals—from Tientsin proper and the outer world. The blockade was aimed at the British concession, but Japan found it necessary to extend the blockade Order. to include the French concession, despite the absence of any French-Japanese disput, because only in such a manner could a blockade of the British settlement be made effective.

The British.Japanese negotiations are a matter of the outmost concern to every nation with business interests in China and the results of these conferences will have far reaching effects. The Japanese, intent on establishing a “new order in Eastern Asia", through conquest, find that the special position occupied by the occidentals for approximately a Century constitutes one of their chief obstacles to domination of China.

A quarter of a century ago, there were 29 foreign concessions and two international settlements in China, but since then the number has decreased. The International Settlements at Shanghai and at Kuiangsu (Amoy) remain, but there are only nine concessions left in China today and of these there are only three of any real significance, namely, the British and French concessions at Tientsin and the French concession in Shanghai. Together with the Shanghai International Settlement they constitute the last place of refuge for British and French interests in China.

Foreign concessions in Tientsin date from 1860. Once there were eight of them, but the German, Austrian and Russian areas reverted to the Chinese after the WarId War and the Belgian area disappeared in 1928. There are at present foreign concessions in five chinese cities: Shanghai, Tientsin, Hankow and Canton. In all but the last, there has been trouble since Japan begin her invasion of China, 7 July 1937.

These foreign areas are a thorn in the flesh of the Japanese. Wherever the Japanese have established themselves in China, they have attempted to create a commercial and economic monopoly for their nationals. They have done so in Manchukuo, have been steadily trying to do so in North China , and with equal persistence but, with less success in Shanghai. The Japanese claim that these concessions are “hot beds” of anti-Japanese agitation, while the Occidentals charge that Japan wants to bring these foreign areas under her control so as to eliminate foreign competition for her trade in China.

Japan’s increasingly bold attack on foreign settlements brought to a climax her drive on Western interests during- the past eight months involving occupation of Canton and seizufe of Hainan and Spratly Islands. Accordtidg to observers, these moves have tended to transform Japan's struggle against China into a struggle against the Western Powers. The real issue at Tientsin is not the trivial incident involving four Chinese terrorists, but a duel between the East and the West for China’s vast treasure.

The area of conflict in the Far East has been further enlarged by heavy fighting on the Manchukuo-Outer Mongolia
frontiers near Lake Buir Nor. A series of battles between Soviet-Mongolian and Japanese- Manchukuoan forces featuring airplane engagements apparently has been taking place in the region since 11 may. Outer Mongolia, or the Mongolian People’s Republic, was founded 10 July 1924 or a little over fifteen years ago. It has well organized and well trained army; equipped and assisted by Soviet troops.

Cheers. Tigre.
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2 missing Campaigns

Post by asiaticus » 07 May 2006 22:40

Military News Around the World - sep 1939.

No important operations have been undertaken since the capture of Nanchang last March. All military efforts have been overshadowed by the British-Japanese crisis, which threatens the whole status of the Occidentals in the Far East.


An interesting oversight as there were two Japanese offensive campaigns occuring at that time between March and Septeber 1939 within China:

Sui-Tsaoyang Campaign (Late April - Mid May, 1939) and First Changsha Campaign (Early Aug. - Early Oct. 1939).
Both were defeats of those offensives of the Japanese Army by the Chinese. Aside from the minor setback at Tai er zhang these were there first real reverses for Japan in the war.

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First Changsha Campaign

Post by tigre » 07 May 2006 23:36

Hello asiaticus, however I will take a look; I believe I saw something about Changsha ahead. Regards. Tigre.

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Re: 2 missing Campaigns

Post by asiaticus » 08 May 2006 04:59

I believe I saw something about Changsha ahead. Regards. Tigre


I am sure there is something about it. There were 4 attempts to take it between 1939 and 1944 when the Japanese finally got it during the Ichigo Offensive.

Sui-Tsaoyang Campaign (Late April - Mid May, 1939) was happened shortly after Nanchang and may have been presumed to be part of the Chinese counterattacks and overlooked in the articles for that reason. I also imagine the Japanese did not want to broadcast these reverses after things seemed to be going so well until this time.

Both battles are similar in that the Chinese were able to stike at the enemies vulnerable communications and rear forcing a retirement.

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Sui-Tsaoyang Campaign oob.

Post by asiaticus » 08 May 2006 05:09

Sui-Tsaoyang Campaign (Late April - Mid May, 1939)


Japan[1]

11th Army - Gen. Yasuji Okamura[1] [3]
- 3rd Division - Gen. Masataka Yamawaki?
--5th Infantry Brigade
--- 6th Infantry Regiment
--- 68th Infantry Regiment
--29th Infantry Brigade
--- 18th Infantry Regiment
--- 34th Infantry Regiment
-- 3rd Field Artillery Regiment
-- 3rd Cavalry Regiment
-- 3rd Engineer Regiment
-- 3rd Transport Regiment
- 13th Division - Gen. Shizuichi Tanaka ?
--- 26th Infantry Brigade
---- 58th Infantry Regiment
---- 116th Infantry Regiment
--- 103rd Infantry Brigade
---- 65th Infantry Regiment
---- 104th Infantry Regiment
--- 19th Mountain Artilley Regiment
--- 17th Cavalry Regiment
--- 13th Engineer Regiment
--- 13th Transport Regiment
- 16th Division – General Keisuke Fujie [3]
-- 19th Infantry Brigade
--- 9th Infantry Regiment
--- 20th Infantry Regiment
-- 30th Infantry Brigade
--- 33rd Infantry Regiment
--- 38th Infantry Regiment
-- 22nd Field Artillery Regiment
-- 20th Cavalry Regiment
-- 16th Engineer Regiment
-- 16th Transport Regiment
- 4th Cavalry Brigade - Cdr. ?
-- 25th Cavalry Regiment
-- 26th Cavalry Regiment
-- Machine gun Squadron
-- Quick-firing Artillery Squadron
-- Mounted Artillery Regiment
-- Tank unit
-- Independent Infantry Battalion
-- Independent Engineer Squadron
-- 4th Mounted Artillery Regiment
-- 72nd Cavalry Regiment

15th Division also participated? [5]
http://www.uglychinese.org/war.htm#Ichigo

15th Division - Cdr? 岩松义维 [4]
-15th Infantry Brigade Group
--1 tankette company
--51st Infantry Regiment.
--60th Infantry Regiment.
--67th Infantry Regiment.
-15th Division Reconnaissance Company
-21st Field Artillery Regiment
-15th Military Engineer Regiment
-15th Transport Regiment

Formed in Nagoya April 4, 1938.
July 15, 1938, enrolled in the Central China expeditionary force order of battle
(1) Infantry Brigade Group had 1 tankette company
(4) Only a Reconnissance Company

Notes:
15th Division and 4th Cavalry were directly under Central China Expeditionary Force command at this time and apparently were attached to 11th Army for this operation.


China

5th War Area - Li Tsung-jen (Late April, 1939)
- Right Flank Army - Chang Tze-chung
-- 33rd Army Group - Chang Tze-chung(concurrent)
--- 55th Corps - Tsao Fu-lin
---- 29th Division -
---- 74th Division -
--- 59th Corps - Chang Tze-chung (concurrent)
---- 38th Division -
---- 180th Division -
---- 13th Cav. Brigade -
--- 77th Corps - Feng Chih-an
---- 37th Division -
---- 132nd Division -
---- 179th Division -
---- 9th Cavalry Division -
-- 29th Army Group - Wang Tsan-hsu
--- 44th Corps - Liao Chen
---- 149th Division -
---- 150th Division -
--- 67th Corps - Hsu Shao-tsung
---- 161st Division -
---- 162nd Division -
--122nd Division - Wang Chih-yuan / from 41st Corps/ 22nd Army Group below

- Left Flank Army - Li Pin-hsien
-- 11th Army Group - Li Pin-hsien(concurrent)
---39th Corps - Liu Ho-ting
--- 34th Division -
--- 56th Division -
---84th Corps - Chin Lien-fang
--- 173rd Division -
--- 174th Division -
--- 189th Division -
-- 125th Division - Wang Shih-chun from 45th Corps / 22nd Army Group below

- River Defense Force - Kuo Chan
-- 26th Corps - Hsiao Chih-chu
--- 41st Division -
--- 56th Division -
-- 185th Division -
-- 128th Division -
-- 9th Peace Preservation Regt. -

- 31st Army Group - Tang En-po
-- 85th Corps - Wang Chung-lien
--- 4th Division -
--- 23rd Division -
--- 91st Division -
-- 13th Corps - Chang Chen
--- 89th Division -
--- 110th Division -
--- 193rd Division -

- 21st Army Group - Liao Lei
--7th Corps - Chang Kan
--- 171st Division -
--- 172nd Division -
--48th Corps - Chang Yi-chun
--- 138th Division -
--- 176th Division -

- 2nd Army Group - Sun Lien-chung
--68th Corps - Liu Ju-ming
--- 119th Division -
--- 143rd Division (formerly 1st War Area)
--30th Corps - Tien Chen-nan
--- 27th Division -
--- 44th Sep. Bde. -

- 22nd Army Group - Sun Cheng
-- 45th Corps - Chen Ting-hsun
--- less 125th Division - Wang Shih-chun, to Left Flank Army (above)
--- 127th Division -
-- 41st Corps - Sun Cheng
--- less 122nd Division - Wang Chih-yuan, to Right Flank Army (above)
--- 124th Division -

Sources:
[1] Hsu Long-hsuen and Chang Ming-kai, History of The Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) 2nd Ed. ,1971. Translated by Wen Ha-hsiung , Chung Wu Publishing; 33, 140th Lane, Tung-hwa Street, Taipei, Taiwan Republic of China.

[3] Generals from Japan (WWII)

http://www.generals.dk/nation/Japan/S.html

[4] IJA in China orbat, 1937 to 1945

http://www.china-defense.com/forum/show ... php?t=1168


[5] Account of the Sui-Tsaoyang Campaign on:
http://www.uglychinese.org/war.htm#Ichigo

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asiaticus
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Map of Sui-Tsaoyang Campaign

Post by asiaticus » 08 May 2006 06:06

Sui-Tsaoyang Campaign map from Hsu Long-hsuen and Chang Ming-kai, History of The Sino-Japanese War (1937-1945) 2nd Ed. ,1971. Translated by Wen Ha-hsiung , Chung Wu Publishing; 33, 140th Lane, Tung-hwa Street, Taipei, Taiwan Republic of China.

Note the Japanese 4th Infantry Division indicated would actually be the 4th Cavalry Brigade. 29th Division sympol I beleive should be 29th Brigade of the 3rd Division.
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