First air raid on Japan.

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tigre
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First air raid on Japan.

Post by tigre » 22 Jan 2006 08:39

Hello to all another article

On 23 February, Toyko was shocked by the news that Chinese planes, carrying the Far Eastern War to Japanese soil for the first time, had bombed Taihoku, capital of Formosa, and Shinchiku (Figure 2) in the first Chinese air raid, anywhere in the Japanese Empire. It was the first time since 1864, when a British-French-Dutch fleet bombarded Shimonoseki, that the territory of the Japanese Empire had been subject to hostile foreign bombardment.
Formosa lies approximately ninety miIes east of the southeastern coast of China and has been used as an airplane and troop base for Japanese operations in South China.
It was ceded to Japan by China in 1895 as a result of the Chinese-Japanese War, 1894-95. Reports is to the material damage caused by the spectacular raid are greatly contradictory; it has however, bolstered Chinese morale and also furnished evidence of the reorganization of the Chinese air force which now reached such a volume as to enable the Chinese Government again to undertake attacks. Japan has had overwhelming air superiority since the beginning of hostilities and for this reason many observers believe that the raiding planes came from the interior of China and stopped en route at an air field to refuel.

Source: The Sino-Japanese War. Military Review, march 1938.

Regards. Tigre.
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Sewer King
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First air raid on Japan

Post by Sewer King » 22 Jan 2006 15:02

Does anyone know what the leaflets said (in general), that were dropped by Chinese Martin B-10 bombers over Japan? What became of the bombers in the end -- destroyed in action, on the ground, lost to unserviceability, etc?

The British-led allied force that bombarded Shimonoseki in 1864 also included one American warship. She was the hastily-commissioned Ta-Kiang, a little commercial steamer fitted with one gun. This rent-a-ship was something of an embarassment to the Americans, who could arrange no better so far away during their Civil War. But she fought well enough for her captain to be cited by the British commanding admiral. Shimonoseki was also notable for a first landing of foreign troops in Japan, and into combat besides.

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Details of the Taipei airraid

Post by asiaticus » 23 Jan 2006 08:44

From Sino-Japanese Air War 1937-45
http://surfcity.kund.dalnet.se/sino-japanese.htm

23 February 1938
On 23 February two groups of SBs (28 from Hankou and 12 from Nanchang) attacked Taibei aerodrome on Taiwan. At Taibei the Japanese were assembling the Fiat BR.20 bombers (designated “Type 1”) bought from Italy and it was decided to try to destroy the new enemy bombers before they could reach the front.
In the first SB group were only Soviet crews, while the second group was mixed. For the sake of surprise, the course passed north of the island and at the western tip made a sharp right turn and descended with the motors on reduced power to an altitude of 4000 m. Only Polynin’s group from Hankou reached the target. The Nanchang group made a mistake and had to turn back.
The aerodrome appeared covered in a thick blanket of clouds, but the pilots pressed on and at the last a window opened in the cloud. The Japanese aircraft stood in two rows in the open and to the side of the field were yet unpacked containers. There were no Japanese efforts of camouflage and the SB group dropped 280 bombs. The antiaircraft opened fire late and fighters were unable to take off. Diving lower, the bombers dispersed and flew off to the sea.
The returning crew reported that saw about 40 assembled aircraft, hangers and a three year supply of aviation fuel burning. It is also reported that the commandant of the aerodrome committed suicide.
One SB from the Nanchang group was lost. A Chinese pilot after using up all his fuel made a forced landing in a lake which he mistook for the shallow waters of a rice paddy. The entire crew drowned, including the Soviet navigator, M. A. Tarygin (who was also the air group commissar) (according to some sources he is listed as killed on 24 February).

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Details of the Taipei airraid

Post by tigre » 25 Jan 2006 04:54

Hello asiaticus, great complement. Cheers. Tigre. :wink:

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