V1s start being launched 2 weeks earlier

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wm
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Re: V1s start being launched 2 weeks earlier

Post by wm » 22 Jan 2023 20:06

T. A. Gardner wrote:
22 Jan 2023 00:27
Wrong! Düren-Detmold had serious limitations, if it would work at all.
Maybe, but it was a technical limitation The control wires were 22 gage spring steel, and when used from an aerial platform had two serious and unfixable problems. The first was tension on the wires. If the wire became to tensioned, it would snap and control was lost.
Maybe but those were technical limitations - possible to overcome - when the other designs (based on radio waves) were limited by laws of physics.

With proper tactics and when fired from high altitude and high angle (close to 90 degrees), there would be no tension because of the speed the missile travels.
Fritz X needed 4 seconds to reach its operational range; in that time, mere inertia should have protected the wire.

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T. A. Gardner
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Re: V1s start being launched 2 weeks earlier

Post by T. A. Gardner » 22 Jan 2023 23:53

wm wrote:
22 Jan 2023 20:06
T. A. Gardner wrote:
22 Jan 2023 00:27
Wrong! Düren-Detmold had serious limitations, if it would work at all.
Maybe, but it was a technical limitation The control wires were 22 gage spring steel, and when used from an aerial platform had two serious and unfixable problems. The first was tension on the wires. If the wire became to tensioned, it would snap and control was lost.
Maybe but those were technical limitations - possible to overcome - when the other designs (based on radio waves) were limited by laws of physics.

With proper tactics and when fired from high altitude and high angle (close to 90 degrees), there would be no tension because of the speed the missile travels.
Fritz X needed 4 seconds to reach its operational range; in that time, mere inertia should have protected the wire.
The radio-controlled versions were more practical. They could be controlled to longer ranges--the wire-controlled ones took the plane within defensive AA range of ships--while the number of channels to transmit course orders on was much greater. If the Germans used VHF or UHF radio on FM with a highly directional antenna, jamming would have been difficult to accomplish. The other advantage is the signals could be modulated such that they weren't 'all-or-nothing' but rather graduated to allow the control surfaces to make subtle adjustments to the missile's course.

The problem for the Germans in WW 2 was a combination of lack of research into really high frequency systems and more crippling, a lack of manufacturing capacity. About half of all German tubes were imported during the war and about a third came from Dutch Philips company in the Netherlands. Philips was the largest manufacturer in Europe at the time. The downside to that was the owners fled the country when it was invaded taking most of the intellectual property of the company with them meaning Germany could get the tube production but not the R&D on new types. That went mostly to the US via the owners now set up in the Dutch Antilles in the Caribbean. They went there to avoid having their company absorbed by a US one, but wanted to cooperate with the US to get the Netherlands freed from German occupation.

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