What if Germany got info about D-day 24 hours beforeit came?

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Qvist
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Post by Qvist » 28 Jan 2003 09:38

I further agree with the earlier post...it was impossible to move units during day time. If the Germans did start to move the Panzers from Calais to Normandy, then it might have allowed the Allies to bomb them from the sky anyway as they had control over the skies.
Sorry, but this is all demonstrably wrong.

It was not impossible to move units by daytime, as is clearly evidenced by the fact that none of the mobile units moving up to the Normandy front curtailed movement during the day. Nor did any of them suffer any great casualties from air attack during the march. The biggest problem was the destruction of the Seine bridges, which often neccessitated long detours.

As it happened, the only combat ready Panzers present in the Calais sector was the 2nd Panzer Division, and it started moving to Normandy as I recall a few days after the landing. Once it started, it was able to move very swiftly to the invasion front, despite the fact it had to detour through Paris, and it did not suffer considerable casualties from air attacks.

cheers

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Sam H.
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Post by Sam H. » 28 Jan 2003 14:23

Rail transport was greatly reduced before and during the d-day campaign. While panzer units might have been able to tranverse the roads, infantry units were forced to march on foot virtually the entire trip. Therefore, while panzer units could have made it to the front fairly quickly. It would have taken quite a while for the infantry of the 15th army to march to Normandy.

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Qvist
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Post by Qvist » 28 Jan 2003 15:38

Sam H

Very true. If you look at themovement data for individual units, it is evident that motorised formations traveling by their own means were capable of reaching Normandy quickly despite allied air activity, whereas non-motorised units relying on rail transport took a very long time indeed, often several weeks.

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Madsen
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Post by Madsen » 29 Jan 2003 02:08

It would have taken quite a while for the infantry of the 15th army to march to Normandy.
remember rading about the men under General Patton. they marched 150km in three days from one battle and straight into the a new battle :D

Like Napoleon said, Hitler had to much land to defend. if he for example got half of the army that stand in Norway down to Europe that would have done something.
But as we know now, hitler did sacrified allot of men with the "fight to the last" thing. if he retreated more to shorten supply lines and so on the eatern front he could have saved allot of men there. who could give everyone allot of trouble when they cloose in on germany.
but most of all. if he just would let his Generals do their job.
The Crazy thing he did with bombing London and other citys was just making the British people more pist off on him, and he lost too much before he found out that.

But Still. i think that if he came up with the idea" They will land at Normandy in just a couple of days" and acted out of that, the whole invation would been blown into the ocean again.

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peter_suciu
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Post by peter_suciu » 29 Jan 2003 04:29

On D-Day the B-17 and other heavy bombers lacked prime targets but if suddenly the German army is on the move it might have given a better target.

I still don't think the Germans expected the airborne drops and the dummies that were dropped might have convinced the Germans that this wasn't the real invasion.

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Qvist
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Post by Qvist » 29 Jan 2003 09:20

Lillebror:
remember rading about the men under General Patton. they marched 150km in three days from one battle and straight into the a new battle
Or, more likely, rode 150 km in three days in trucks? :D

Peter Suciu:
On D-Day the B-17 and other heavy bombers lacked prime targets but if suddenly the German army is on the move it might have given a better target
The German army was on the move, on D-day and the days following. But I don't know of any example of heavy bombers being used to interdict road movement.

There's not really any great mystery to this. Motorised units were capable of moving largely unhurt to Normandy in a short time from anywhere in the West, which many did at various stages of the campaign. Unmotorised formations relied on rail transport, and under the presure of allied air attack, the Germans did not have the rail capacity to move them all speedily, as evidenced by the long travelling time of the infantry divisions that were transported to Normandy. If they had decided to bring down the 15th Army, they certainly would not have had the rail capacity to do that quickly.

cheers

cheers

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Madsen
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Post by Madsen » 30 Jan 2003 23:19

i see it as this: Every soldier or weapon the germans could get into Normandy berfore first allied soldier set foot on land would bee tho the better for the german and to the worse for the allied side.
that is howi see it 8)

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