If the US is isolationist after WWII, is the USSR going to be more aggressive in its foreign policy?

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Futurist
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If the US is isolationist after WWII, is the USSR going to be more aggressive in its foreign policy?

Post by Futurist » 17 Dec 2018 07:58

If the US is going to be isolationist after the end of WWII (either as a result of the US never entering the war as a result of France not falling in 1940 or as a result of isolationist sentiments in the US triumphing after the Allied victory in WWII--perhaps with a Robert Taft victory in 1948), is the USSR going to be more aggressive in its foreign policy in the post-WWII years and decades?

Without US involvement, it's much harder to maintain an anti-USSR coalition. I suppose that Britain, France, and Italy could try to create an anti-USSR coalition without the US, but it probably won't be anywhere near as effective without the US's extremely massive manpower and economic might. Also, if the USSR never gets involved in WWII (as a result of France not falling in 1940), it is going to have a lot more manpower to spare--though this might be somewhat compensated by the lack of Lend-Lease.

Anyway, what are your own thoughts on this?

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Re: If the US is isolationist after WWII, is the USSR going to be more aggressive in its foreign policy?

Post by South » 17 Dec 2018 22:34

Good afternoon Futurist,

The perhaps 1948 Robert Taft victory is listed next to the definitive 1949 Mao victory. This sets part of the state to reply to the question.

Post WWII produced a civilian aviation industry. Glance at the Bermuda Accords. Contemplate discussions in Moscow on this subject-matter. Contemplate discussions in American boardrooms on this subject-matter.

The lifeblood of industry post WWII,was petroleum. Petroleum was also a catalyst for non-industrial matters. Would a neutral USA have petroleum companies working their trade and producing revenue for their investors ?

Where (a geography question) would be the best place to get large-scale financing for, eg, large agricultural production ? for, eg, for large residential housing projects ?

How would a neutral USA handle the Potsdam agreement in re the 2 Germany-s ? the administration of Berlin ?

............

The eastern world, it is explodin',
Violence flaring,...
...
...
Ah, ya don't believe on the eve of destruction
...
...
Ah, you may leave for four days in space,
But when you return, it's the same old place.

........
Barry McGuire

...................

They're rioting in Africa
They're starving in Spain
...
Th French hate the Germans, the Germans hate the Poles
...
...
But we can be tranquil and thankful and proud
... a mushroom-shaped cloud.

...............
The Kingston Trio

The other side of the stage:

Circa 1949, Moscow became a nuclear power. Afterward, so did France and China.

Whether the US was a post WWII neutral - officially speaking, that is - .......

It's not worth the effort to try to compress a liquid.


~ Bob
eastern Virginia, USA

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Re: If the US is isolationist after WWII, is the USSR going to be more aggressive in its foreign policy?

Post by OpanaPointer » 17 Dec 2018 23:00

If the US expresses a lack of interest with regard to the fate of the other countries on Earth they would pragmatically decide to be at least neutral toward the USSR and its export of communist philosophy. It wouldn't be long before the US was truly isolated.
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Re: If the US is isolationist after WWII, is the USSR going to be more aggressive in its foreign policy?

Post by Futurist » 18 Dec 2018 06:19

OpanaPointer wrote:
17 Dec 2018 23:00
If the US expresses a lack of interest with regard to the fate of the other countries on Earth they would pragmatically decide to be at least neutral toward the USSR and its export of communist philosophy. It wouldn't be long before the US was truly isolated.
Britain, France, and Italy could still serve as bulwarks against Communism in this scenario, though.

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Re: If the US is isolationist after WWII, is the USSR going to be more aggressive in its foreign policy?

Post by South » 18 Dec 2018 08:17

Good morning Futurist,

Ref: "Britain, France, and Italy could...";

Circa 1949, chief honcho of the French Communists, Tavarish Marcel Cachin, told the French Assembly that there were benefits of peaceful coexistence. He then flew to Italy and met with Tavarish Togliatti. They then made speeches about achieving communism via peaceful means.

Soon after the above episode, French Communist honcho Tavarish Maurice Thorez, ...... I cannot find my actual reference to the specific place and time made .... stated that if Soviet troops invaded Paris, the French Communists would fight on the Soviet side.

During WWII, France was split into 3 (three): Occupied France, Vichy France and DeGaulle's Free French in exile. The Sun King's nation of France was really split after the French Revolution. Was it von Metternich who called Italy "a geographic expression" ?

The UK had some domestic and colonial economic matters to attend to. Won't write the word "political" because I'm not "up to speed" on their post war
nationalizations of some industries.

.....

NATO: "To keep the Soviets out, the Germans down and the Americans in".

~ Bob
eastern Virginia, USA

I am now in the mood for a Louie XIII cognac..................

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Re: If the US is isolationist after WWII, is the USSR going to be more aggressive in its foreign policy?

Post by OpanaPointer » 18 Dec 2018 12:32

Futurist wrote:
18 Dec 2018 06:19
OpanaPointer wrote:
17 Dec 2018 23:00
If the US expresses a lack of interest with regard to the fate of the other countries on Earth they would pragmatically decide to be at least neutral toward the USSR and its export of communist philosophy. It wouldn't be long before the US was truly isolated.
Britain, France, and Italy could still serve as bulwarks against Communism in this scenario, though.
"Could", yes. "Would", maybe.
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RE: If The U.S. Is Isolationist After World War Two, Is The U.S.S.R. Going To Be More Aggressive In It's Foreign Policy?

Post by Robert Rojas » 18 Dec 2018 18:21

Greetings to both brother Futurist and the community as a whole. Howdy Futurist (or Alvin Toffler if you so prefer)! Well sir, in respect to your introductory posting of Sunday - December 16, 2018 - 10:58pm, it is the contention of old yours truly that it is difficult, at best, to navigate through this creation of yours since the geopolitical concept of "ISOLATIONISM" means many different things to many different people. I would assert (rightly OR wrongly) that the United States of America is not likely to take ANY sort of ISOLATIONIST stance with its disparate neighbors in the greater Western Hemisphere. The potential election of an isolationist leaning administration in year 1948 notwithstanding, both the Monroe Doctrine (December 02, 1823) and the Act of Havana (August 02, 1940) would guarantee ongoing interchange with the remainder of the greater Western Hemisphere. Unlike Europe, I do NOT envision the United States of America extricating itself from its assumed role as benevolent SHOGUN over a now occupied Japan - especially after the subsequent victory of Mao Zedong's Communists over Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalists in the Chinese Civil War in year 1949. Now, in terms of the thorny matter of Old World, I do NOT envision the United States of America throwing the United Kingdom under the proverbial bus even after its systematic withdrawal from continental Europe. Being ever mindful of what had transpired with the British Isles in the Summer of year 1940, the United States of America would enthusiastically arm the United Kingdom with atomic weapons AND the credible means to deliver them - especially with the long range B-36 Peacemaker Strategic Bomber. It would serve everyone well to remember that British scientific contributions to the Manhattan Project made, in part, the atomic bomb possible. In addition, the Royal Air Force would also be supplied with the F-86 Sabre Jet Fighter for both the air defense of the British Isles and the support of Great Britain's military forces ensconced in continental Europe. Hopefully, the United Kingdom's newly acquired technological prowess will DETER the potential geopolitical ambitions of a now ATOMICALLY ARMED General Secretary Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili in the environs of both Western Europe and the Mediterranean Basin. In light of American neo-isolationism, I do NOT see the formation of anything resembling the historical North Atlantic Treaty Organization, but I do see the beginnings of the rise of something akin to the European Economic Community WITH a collective military component grafted into its overall structure. Needless to say, one also must wonder what direction "traditional" European colonialism will ultimately manifest itself since the United States of America will NOT be leaning on the Europeans to divest themselves of their extraterritorial possessions. It's just something to ponder. Well, that's my initial two Yankee cents worth on this exercise in the price and pitfalls of foreign entanglements - for now anyway. As always, I would like to bid you an especially copacetic day down in your corner of Orange County of our once but not so glorious Golden State of California.

Best Regards From The Greater San Francisco Bay Area,
Uncle Bob :idea: :|
"It is well that war is so terrible, or we should grow too fond of it" - Robert E. Lee

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