Wargaming Operation Sealion

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Leros87
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Wargaming Operation Sealion

Post by Leros87 » 08 Dec 2019 13:25

I am part of an international group who are in the early stages of wargaming the proposed invasion of Great Britain in September 1940. This has been an ongoing activity for some time and is currently staged at S-1. The Wargame is run through a central referee and involves individuals acting as commanders on both sides, with orders and actions being posted by email.

Due to unforeseen circumstances we are now looking for commanders of the German Ninth Army, landing on the Sussex coast from Bexhill to near Brighton, and the British XII Corps, charged with the defence of Kent and Sussex.

The scenarios are based on the best information possible and commanders do not need to have any expertise in wargaming.

This is your chance to join our group and make history. There is still time to make your mark as a commander as we have agreed to a Christmas and New Year break.

I would be happy to pass on expressions of interest to the referee.

Carl Schwamberger
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Re: Wargaming Operation Sealion

Post by Carl Schwamberger » 09 Dec 2019 04:44

Where can I read about this? I am particularly interested in how navigation across the Channel currents and tides is modeled in the game.

pugsville
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Re: Wargaming Operation Sealion

Post by pugsville » 09 Dec 2019 09:08

Leros87 wrote:
08 Dec 2019 13:25
I am part of an international group who are in the early stages of wargaming the proposed invasion of Great Britain in September 1940. This has been an ongoing activity for some time and is currently staged at S-1. The Wargame is run through a central referee and involves individuals acting as commanders on both sides, with orders and actions being posted by email.

Due to unforeseen circumstances we are now looking for commanders of the German Ninth Army, landing on the Sussex coast from Bexhill to near Brighton, and the British XII Corps, charged with the defence of Kent and Sussex.

The scenarios are based on the best information possible and commanders do not need to have any expertise in wargaming.

This is your chance to join our group and make history. There is still time to make your mark as a commander as we have agreed to a Christmas and New Year break.

I would be happy to pass on expressions of interest to the referee.
Yup I'm absolutely keen. Perfectly willing to run either side.

Dave.

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Sheldrake
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Re: Wargaming Operation Sealion

Post by Sheldrake » 09 Dec 2019 09:59

Sign me up too.

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Octotrooper
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Re: Wargaming Operation Sealion

Post by Octotrooper » 09 Dec 2019 22:05

I would definitely like to learn more, please contact me so I can get involved.

Rickshaw_665
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Re: Wargaming Operation Sealion

Post by Rickshaw_665 » 10 Dec 2019 12:57

I am interested. However, I also recognise the impossibility of Seelowe ever succeeding. The Royal Navy is simply too strong and the Germans too weak and indecisive.

Leros87
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Re: Wargaming Operation Sealion

Post by Leros87 » 11 Dec 2019 22:21

Thanks to all who have responded. I have passed your on line details to the referee. I have also asked where further info can be found. As regards Rickshaw-665’s comment would I be remiss in saying that as a commander you can bring your own style and confidence to bear.

I am presently the commander of the German troops (in the persona of Karl Student) and as Albert Kesselring, acting as commander of both Airfleet 2 and 3. Big shoes to fill!

nota
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Re: Wargaming Operation Sealion

Post by nota » 17 Dec 2019 13:38

will japan be playing ?

as that is the only real world hope of success for the invaders

OldBill
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Re: Wargaming Operation Sealion

Post by OldBill » 28 Dec 2019 08:02

I'm willing to help out. I have serious reservations about the seaworthiness of some of the German landing barges, I'm retired USCG so have some experience with this.

Knouterer
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Re: Wargaming Operation Sealion

Post by Knouterer » 28 Dec 2019 12:24

Unfortunately I had to give up the role of General Thorne, commander of XII Corps, for lack of time, but I'm still interested to see how it pans out, as I'm writing (yet another ...) "what if" book on Operation Sealion, in which I try to give a (more or less) complete description of the defenses in the invasion areas in September 1940, something that has been lacking in works on the subject up to now. Usually there are only a couple of anecdotes about soldiers patrolling the cliffs of Dover with broomsticks and axe handles, pillboxes built in the wrong places, and such stuff, and a reference to 6-inch coast defence guns in Dymchurch Redoubt, which in actual fact were not there before the summer of 1941. Same for the oft-mentioned beach scaffolding, none of which was present on any of the invasion beaches before November 1940 as far as I've been able to find out, and after that it took months to install continuous barriers.

On the other hand, it might surprise people to learn that landing beach B between Folkestone and Dungeness was as well defended as Omaha Beach in Normandy in June 1944, in terms of men and guns per kilometer, though perhaps not in terms of concrete, mines, and other obstacles. It seems therefore a reasonable assumption that the two German divisions landing there (the 17th and 35th) would suffer at least as many casualties as the 1st and 29th US Divisions at Omaha, probably more, as they lacked proper landing craft and would not have had the naval fire support that proved a decisive factor at Omaha. Assuming they managed to get across more or less on schedule and in reasonably good order that is, which would have been a bit of a miracle in itself, even without any interference by the RAF or the Royal Navy.

Britain as a whole may have been ill-prepared for war in 1939, but the Thorne family was ready. His wife complained that she was the only one who didn't have a uniform to put on:
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"The true spirit of conversation consists in building on another man's observation, not overturning it." Edward George Bulwer-Lytton

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Sheldrake
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Re: Wargaming Operation Sealion

Post by Sheldrake » 28 Dec 2019 14:16

Knouterer wrote:
28 Dec 2019 12:24
Britain as a whole may have been ill-prepared for war in 1939, but the Thorne family was ready. His wife complained that she was the only one who didn't have a uniform to put on:
Bulgy Thorne was passed over for command in the field after 12th Corps. He was a capable man. He played an important part in the battle of Gheluveldt 31 October 1914 when he led the 2nd Battalion the Worcestershire though a covered route in their counter attack to restore the front line.
Hitler was serving in one of the German units attacked and shared old soldier stories with Thorne when he was military attache to Germany in the 1930s.

Knouterer
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Re: Wargaming Operation Sealion

Post by Knouterer » 28 Dec 2019 19:45

In May, Thorne had been in command of the 48th Infantry Division of the BEF, which gave the German 35th Infanteriedivision (which was scheduled to land between Greatstone and Dymchurch in the Sealion plans) a bloody nose, according to a history of the division (Dörfler, Die 35. Infanteriedivision 1939-45, p. 19, my translation):

“The following engagements to force a crossing of the Scheldt (Escaut) were the heaviest and the costliest of the campaign in the West. The crossing began in the afternoon of the 20th. Infantry Regiments 109 at Antoing and 111 at Peronnes wrested bridgeheads from English elite troops. Very heavy artillery fire and counterattacks with tanks caused these lodgings to be largely lost again. Only IR 109 managed to retain a foothold. IR 34 too had to repel fierce attacks. The division was unable to advance on the 21st and the 22nd. On the morning of the 23rd it was found that the British had withdrawn towards the Channel coast.”

The reference to “englische Elitetruppen” sounds like a typical excuse for a (temporary) setback. In fact the 48th Infantry Division had one regular and two territorial battalions in each of its three brigades. According to Philson, IR 111 was (mainly) pushed back by the 4th Ox & Bucks and IR 109 tangled with the 8th Royal Warwickshire, both territorial units.
The tanks mentioned in this account were presumably Mk VI light tanks of Brigadier C. W. Norman's 1st Light Armoured Reconnaissance Brigade, which had come under command of the 48th Division.

So it can be said that Thorne already had some recent experience in throwing German attackers back across water obstacles.
"The true spirit of conversation consists in building on another man's observation, not overturning it." Edward George Bulwer-Lytton

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