Operation Thursday wipeout

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Von Schadewald
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Operation Thursday wipeout

Post by Von Schadewald » 22 Aug 2005 00:40

Wingate's airborne Operation Thursday landings were on March 5 1944. The Japanese U-Go invasion of India was on March 17. WI by spies or chance, the Japanese had been in force at the landing clearings, wiping the Chindits out. What effect would it have had on Allied morale?

Would it have weakened resolve & abilities at Imphal and Kohima?

I think so. Sufficient to capture them, the Assam airfields, cut Stillwell's lifeline, and even to knock China out of the war, offsetting setbacks elsewhere.
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Tim Smith
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Post by Tim Smith » 22 Aug 2005 12:54

I don't believe that this or any Japanese action could have knocked China out of the war entirely. China was too big to be defeated.

The most the Japanese could have done is force the Chinese Nationalists to stay on the defensive for the entire war, conserving their limited resources for later use against the Chinese Communists after the Japanese had been defeated by the Allies. Also the Japanese could prevent the Allies from setting up an operational B-29 airbase in China, which means the early bombing raids on Japan would not happen. But the B-29 raids from China were relatively ineffective anyway, and didn't have a decisive effect on the war.

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Post by Von Schadewald » 22 Aug 2005 18:26

The Japanese goals were:

"1.To climb the wall of the mountains beyond the Chindwin and fall upon the main Allied advance base at Imphal, breaking their grip on the entire frontier.

2. Securing the line of the Imphal-Kohima supply road, to sweep on into the Assam Plain and get astride the Bengal-Assam railway. Thus they would cut the life-line of Stilwell's advance towards Myitkyina along the Mogaung Valley and force him back on Ledo.

3. To overrun the Assam airfields and disrupt the airborne traffic from them over the Hump to China. Thus drying up the petrol flow which kept General Chennault’s 14th Air Force bombing over Occupied China and Japan and stop all munitions supply to Chiang Kai-shek’s armies. By these few bold strokes the Japanese might sever all communication with China and force her out of the war."

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Kurt_Steiner
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Post by Kurt_Steiner » 24 Aug 2005 18:49

Even if the Chindits were defeated, the Japanese would still face a determined Allied force which would defend their positions with the same courage that the did in OTL. In addition to this, the quarrel Sato-Mutaguchi would be still happening and the RAF and the USAAF would still rule the skies.

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Post by Von Schadewald » 24 Aug 2005 21:13

If the Japanese had been able to launch their attack 6-12 months earlier, could they realistically have taken and held Calcutta, even without a Springing Tiger uprising? What would have been the effect on the wider Allied war effort if any?

With hindsight, what was the best use the Japanese could have made of their XXXIII Army?
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TRose
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Post by TRose » 25 Aug 2005 00:58

Might add General Slims the British commander thought the raid was kind of useless and waste of manpower, so would of not effect him at all(Except to maybe send I told you so mesage to his superiors)

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Empiricist
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Re: Operation Thursday wipeout

Post by Empiricist » 26 Mar 2023 19:26

Von Schadewald wrote:
22 Aug 2005 00:40
The Japanese U-Go invasion of India was on March 17.
In fact nobody did in-depth research when Operation U-Gō was initiated. Various books inform that it was on March 4th, 6th, 8th, 9th and 15th, 1944.

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