What size did Hitler want his Polish puppet state to be?

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Sid Guttridge
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Re: What size did Hitler want his Polish puppet state to be?

Post by Sid Guttridge » 02 Jul 2020 23:31

👍

Futurist
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Re: What size did Hitler want his Polish puppet state to be?

Post by Futurist » 03 Jul 2020 01:09

:)

Anyway, I wonder just how much oppression Poles in Imperial Germany experienced by pre-World War I European standards. Also, what about other pre-World War I Imperial German minorities?

Sid Guttridge
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Re: What size did Hitler want his Polish puppet state to be?

Post by Sid Guttridge » 03 Jul 2020 06:20

Hi Futurist,

Wiki:

"Within Bismarck's Kulturkampf policy, the Poles were purposefully presented as "foes of the empire" (German: Reichsfeinde).[8] Bismarck himself privately believed that the only solution to Polish Question was extermination of Poles[9] As the Prussian authorities suppressed Catholic services in Polish language by Polish priests, the Poles had to rely on German Catholic priests. Later, in 1885, the Prussian Settlement Commission was set up from the national government's funds with a mission to buy land from Polish owners and distribute it among German colonists.[10] In reaction to this the Poles also founded a commission of their own to buy farmland and distribute it to Poles.[citation needed] Eventually 150,000 were settled on Polish territories. In 1888, the mass deportations of Poles from Prussia were organized by German authorities. This was further strengthened by the ban on building of houses by Poles (see Drzymała's van).[11] Another means of the policy was the elimination of non-German languages from public life, schools and from academic settings. At its extremes, the Germanisation policies in schools took the form of abuse of Polish children by Prussian officials (see Września children strike). The harsh policies had the reverse effect of stimulating resistance, usually in the form of home schooling and tighter unity in the minority groups. In 1890 the Germanisation of Poles was slightly eased for a couple of years but the activities intensified again since 1894 and continued until the end of the World War I. This led to international condemnation, e.g., an international meeting of socialists held in Brussels in 1902 called the Germanisation of Poles in Prussia "barbarous".[12] Nevertheless, the Settlement Commission was empowered with new more powerful rights, which entitled it to force Poles to sell the land since 1908."

Cheers,

Sid

gebhk
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Re: What size did Hitler want his Polish puppet state to be?

Post by gebhk » 03 Jul 2020 10:22

Though the 'until the end of WW1' should not be taken as a uniform policy. The predominantly Polish peasantry of Posen and other Polish-inhabited areas of Germany provided particularly good military material, and efforts were made to keep it 'on-side when there was a 'war on'. Needless to say, this mainly consisted of PR and promises but legend has it that at times the Polish national anthem was played to 'Kaczmarek Regimenter' before they were sent into battle.

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