Karski and Anthony Eden

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Karski
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Re: Karski and Anthony Eden

Post by Karski » 08 Nov 2022 09:48

If we believe Jan Nowak, there was an evolution in Karski's statements about his meeting with Anthony Eden :

In February 1943, Karski meets with British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden. (E.T. Wood and S.M. Jankowski, ''Karski (...)'', revised edition of 2014, Texas Tech University Press and Gihon River Press, p. 150-151.) Both Eden and Karski left reports of this interview. (Eden, Anthony: Report to War Cabinet on conversations with Karski, February 17, 1943, CAB 66/34, Public Record Office, London; Karski's notes on his conversations with personalities in London, 1943, Hoover Institution Archives, Karski papers, Box 1. These references are given by E.T. Wood and S.M. Jankowski, ''Karski (...)'', revised edition of 2014 , Texas Tech University Press and Gihon River Press, p. 275.) In a book published in 1978, Jan Nowak (Jan Nowak-Jeziorański), another courier of the Polish resistance, wrote: "I knew from Jan Karski himself that he had taken advantage of an audience at Eden to speak in detail about the systematic and progressive extermination of the Jewish population. The British Secretary of State considered this meeting important enough to communicate the report to all the members of the War Cabinet. I found it in the Archives and was surprised to find that nothing Karski had said about the liquidation of the Jews was there. Why ? » (Jan Nowak, ''Courier from Warsaw''; quoted from the French translation ''Courrier de Varsovie'', Gallimard, 1983, p. 232.) In 1987, nine years after the publication of Nowak's book, Karski will give a different version: he had not spoken "in detail" to Eden about the extermination of the Jews, he had only tried to approach the subject, but Eden had interrupted him by saying that he already knew "Karski's report", which Karski later explained by assuming that Eden had read the report that the Polish government in exile had drawn up from the documents brought from Poland by Karski. (Maciej Kozlowski, "Niespelona misja (...)", Tygodnik Powszechny, n° 11, 1987; English translation “The Mission that Failed: An Interview with Jan Karski”, ''Dissent'', vol. 34, 1987, p. 326-334; English translation reproduced in Antony Polonsky (dir.), ''My Brother's Keeper (...)'', Routledge, 2002, p.81-97, spec. 91-92. Historians E.T. Wood and S.M. Jankowski, ''Karski (...)'', revised edition of 2014, Texas Tech University Press and Gihon River Press, p. 150-151, present a version close to that which Karski gave in 1987. They do not specify whether the reports written by Eden and by Karski in 1943 mention an attempt by Karski to evoke the fate of the Jews in front of Eden.)

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wm
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Re: Karski and Anthony Eden

Post by wm » 09 Nov 2022 03:49

So the chain of events was as follows:
November 25 - the Polish Government-in-Exile hands Karski's report to A. L. Easterman,
November 26 - Richard Law, Eden's deputy, receives the report,
macho discussion ensues, including in the War Cabinet,
December 10 - the Polish Polish Government-in-Exile publishes "The Mass Extermination of Jews in German Occupied Poland" - addressed to the United Nations,
December 14 - the War Cabinet approves the Three-Power Declaration condemning German policy and threatening retribution,
December 17 - more governments accept the Declaration; Anthony Eden reads it in the House of Commons,
December 25 - the Polish Government-in-Exile asks Churchill directly for reprisals for mass expulsions, slaughter, and mass executions,

December 31 - the Polish appeal is discussed at a meeting of the British Chefs of Staff Committee,
January 2 - the appeal is rejected,
~ February 1 - Karski meets Eden,
~ February 4 - the second meeting,
February 17 - Eden writes his report and communicates it to all members of the War Cabinet, supposedly without mentioning the Jews.

So, as can be seen, there were probably two reasons Eden didn't do it.
Firstly, the information he received from Karski (or didn't receive, according to some) was worthless.
It was an executive summary of a well-known, much more detailed report.
Secondly, it was useless - it was old news, extensively discussed already; decisions had been made, declarations issued. There was no reason to repeat the process as no new information was offered.

I have doubts that Nowak could have remembered precisely what was said in an informal talk with Karski 30+ years earlier. That he even understood it correctly, considering it was a complex history (and he wasn't a historian) poorly understood then and poorly understood, by many, even today.

Adampul
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Re: Karski and Anthony Eden

Post by Adampul » 14 Nov 2022 13:19

"November 25 - the Polish Government-in-Exile hands Karski's report to A. L. Easterman"
The problem is that this was not Karski's report. It was summary of report received by Polish authorities on 13th of November, with was neither written by Karski nor delivered by Karski, please read Pulawski's book, contact with him and he may sent you pdf of his book, best regards

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wm
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Re: Karski and Anthony Eden

Post by wm » 15 Nov 2022 22:45

It's from "Auschwitz and the Allies" by Martin Gibert because Karski himself used it as a source in his interview for "Emisariusz własnymi słowami."

The sole point is, in February 1943, it was all water under the bridge; what Karski said (or could have said) about the Jews was of no value and didn't deserve any reporting.
What he said about the Polish Underground was valuable, but Eden wasn't interested.

I actually have read Puławski's "W obliczu zagłady" (more or less two times) but there is no Karski there.

Adampul
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Re: Karski and Anthony Eden

Post by Adampul » 16 Nov 2022 14:59

"I actually have read Puławski's "W obliczu zagłady" (more or less two times) but there is no Karski there".

First Puławski's 2009 book contains facts until the begining of "Great Deportation" in Warsaw. Look at the second Puławski's 2018 book, there is a lot of Karski's mision, but not only of him, but of Napoleon Segieda, Wojciech Mańkowski as well

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