Georgians in Polish Army

Discussions on all aspects of Poland during the Second Polish Republic and the Second World War. Hosted by Peter K
User avatar
Georgien
Member
Posts: 265
Joined: 30 May 2005 18:42
Location: Tbilisi, Georgia

Post by Georgien » 06 Jul 2005 21:26

i will find it give me one day.

User avatar
Georgien
Member
Posts: 265
Joined: 30 May 2005 18:42
Location: Tbilisi, Georgia

Post by Georgien » 11 Jul 2005 18:33

Bratello,

As i promised:

http://www.conflicts.rem33.com/images/G ... LEGION.htm

in Russian

Thanks

bratello
Member
Posts: 373
Joined: 26 Oct 2004 15:46
Location: Rome, Italy

Post by bratello » 17 Jul 2005 20:58

Georgien wrote:Bratello, As i promised: http://www.conflicts.rem33.com/images/G ... LEGION.htm...
Thank you and regards.

User avatar
Halibutt
Member
Posts: 182
Joined: 08 Aug 2005 13:46
Location: Warsaw, Poland

Post by Halibutt » 22 Oct 2005 14:13

yerbamatt wrote:It really baffles me how easy was for some to make those decisions after living over twenty years in exile. Nothing counted for them, all debts to the host country aside - only some narrowly comprehended interests. It seems to me that this simply is the way - the same happenned in Texel in 1945 and with some ex-Soviet high-ranking officers after 1991. We should be aware of that.
I doubt such decisions are ever easy. After all it takes a lot of faith to believe in a dream of independence. And I can perfectly understand Georgian officers from Poland joining the only side that gave them at least a rag of hope. After all they were allowed to the Polish Army because of Piłsudski's dream that one day Georgia will be reborn and that it will need an army. That's why they were accepted on a slightly different basis than, let's say, French or American officers (there were such people too, especially during the Polish-Bolshevik War, but many of them stayed).

As to Georgians - one of the Polish fora once mentioned that in mid-1920's there were some 25 Georgian graduates of the Infantry Training School alone. So, this would mean that, with all probability, the number of Georgian NCOs might've reached 100 or even more as the Infantry Training School was one of several similar facilities in Poland before WWII.
Cheers

User avatar
Lach
Member
Posts: 62
Joined: 06 Dec 2004 15:25
Location: Ukraine

Post by Lach » 28 Oct 2005 14:49

There was an article in Mniejszosci narodowe... if I'm not mistakin'

User avatar
kindzjal
Member
Posts: 95
Joined: 27 Oct 2005 18:36
Location: Netherlands

Georgians in the AK !

Post by kindzjal » 13 Nov 2005 19:00

In the polish underground army Armia Krajowa (Home Army) there were several Georgians.
I've seen photos of a group Georgian and other Kaukasian volunteers in the partisan group of mjr. "Ponury" . They escaped from the German Ostlegion and joined the AK. Their commander was a man called "Kazbek".

Best regards

User avatar
michalst
Member
Posts: 340
Joined: 05 Mar 2006 21:06
Location: Oslo/Norway

Post by michalst » 13 Feb 2008 08:58

kindzjal:

Do you know which ostlegion/battalion those Georgians and other Caucasian volunteers that where in "Ponurys" group deserted from?

User avatar
Halibutt
Member
Posts: 182
Joined: 08 Aug 2005 13:46
Location: Warsaw, Poland

Post by Halibutt » 13 Feb 2008 15:01

michalst wrote:kindzjal:

Do you know which ostlegion/battalion those Georgians and other Caucasian volunteers that where in "Ponurys" group deserted from?
I'm not sure, but Ponury's group was active mostly in the region of the Holy Cross Mountains (around the town of Kielce), which might give you a hint.
Cheers

User avatar
michalst
Member
Posts: 340
Joined: 05 Mar 2006 21:06
Location: Oslo/Norway

Post by michalst » 13 Feb 2008 15:48

Ponury operated in the north-eastern parts of Poland - Nowogródek - too, so they might have joined his group there.

User avatar
Halibutt
Member
Posts: 182
Joined: 08 Aug 2005 13:46
Location: Warsaw, Poland

Post by Halibutt » 13 Feb 2008 16:04

michalst wrote:Ponury operated in the north-eastern parts of Poland - Nowogródek - too, so they might have joined his group there.
According to this site Kazbek and his men defected from a Kielce-based Ost-Legion already in 1942. If that's important, I could check with "Pozdrówcie góry świętokrzyskie", a monograph on Ponury. I'm sure I have it somewhere.
Cheers[/url]

User avatar
kindzjal
Member
Posts: 95
Joined: 27 Oct 2005 18:36
Location: Netherlands

Re: Georgians in Polish Army

Post by kindzjal » 17 Sep 2008 18:11

This happened in the Holy Cross Mountains near of Kielce. We still don't know from which unit they escaped ?

A very interesting movie, about the Georgians in polish service :

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid ... 1895&hl=pl

Image

Peter K
Host - Allied sections
Posts: 3677
Joined: 12 Jul 2006 19:17
Location: Poland

Re: Georgians in Polish Army

Post by Peter K » 12 Mar 2009 22:28

Colonel Roman Gwelesiani - commander of Obszar Warowny "Kraków" (Fortificated Area "Cracow") in 1939, he fought for example in defense of Silesia, after the battle of Pszczyna (01.09 - 04.09.1939) significanlty helped in regrouping 6. Infantry Division. Later he served in Polish Armed Forces in the West.

Six Georgian generals were serving in Polish Army before 1934:

- Zachariasz Bakaradze - killed in a car accident on 03.12.1938 in Bydgoszcz
- Aleksander Czcheidze - before 1934 commander of divisional infantry of 16 DP, murdered by NKVD in Katyn in 1940
- Iwan Kazbek - died in February of 1944 in Warsaw
- Aleksander Koniaszwili - died in 1955 in Argentina
- Kiril Kutateładze - died in 1929 in Warsaw
- Aleksander Zachariadze - died in 1956 in France

Koniaszwili, Kazbek, Czcheidze, Kutateładze were no longer in Polish Army in 1934 and in 1938.

Koniaszwili collaborated with Germans during the war, later escaped to Argentina.

Two Georgian officers were serving in Polish navy during the whole WW2 (Jerzy Tumaniszwili-Tumanow and Wiktor Łomidze-Wachtang). Tumaniszwili even wrote some poems about ORP "Orzel" submarine and about Poland and Poles.

More Georgian officers serving in Polish Army:

Aleksandr Tabidze - murdered by the Soviets in Łubianka prison in Moscow
Waliko Temzadze
Artemi Aroniszidze (major) - commander of II. / 63. Infantry Regiment (4. Infantry Division) in 1939
Łado Chundadze
Aleksandr Kapiani
Giorgi Mamaładze - murdered by NKVD in Katyn in 1940
Wasili Rusjaszwili - murdered by the Soviets in Łubianka prison in Moscow
Misza Rusjaszwili
Arkadi Schirtladze (captain pilot) - murdered by NKVD in Katyn in 1940
Misza Kwaliaszwili
Aleksander Sergiusz Aławidze
Borys Jerzy Pawleniszwili
Płaton Mikeładze

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDFoDacQ ... re=related

Information that Artemi Aroniszidze received VM for the defence of Warsaw from this video above is false - he was not in Warsaw then, he was not the commander of the first baricade in Grojecka street on 09.09.1939:

http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic. ... &p=1295360

Greenwood
Member
Posts: 14
Joined: 19 Aug 2009 16:49

Re: Georgians in Polish Army

Post by Greenwood » 19 Aug 2009 23:09

Well all this shows, that if a large part of a nationality fight for Poland. poland counts them as equals to Poles, then ukrainians and jews complain about they were seen as lower status citizens -.-

I knew that there were some Gergians in the Polish army. Interessting to read truly!
I saw some film on youtube about it :)

User avatar
Halibutt
Member
Posts: 182
Joined: 08 Aug 2005 13:46
Location: Warsaw, Poland

Re: Georgians in Polish Army

Post by Halibutt » 20 Aug 2009 00:48

Greenwood wrote:Well all this shows, that if a large part of a nationality fight for Poland. poland counts them as equals to Poles, then ukrainians and jews complain about they were seen as lower status citizens -.-

I knew that there were some Gergians in the Polish army. Interessting to read truly!
I saw some film on youtube about it :)
Not sure what your point is, but there was a huge number of both Jews and Ukrainians serving with the Polish army as well. Any military cemetery could be a good example, especially in recent years (formerly all soldiers were buried in identical or similar graves, often without any religious symbols; only in recent years did the Jewish community start marking Jewish soldiers' graves with Magen David).

Georgians had a somewhat special status as contract officers which made them better-known as a national group within the army, which didn't give a darn about ones' nationality as long as the person was loyal to the state. Which is why among those who served were for instance such infamous personalities as Roman Shukhevych, later one of the leaders of the Ukrainian Uprising Army responsible for several hundred thousand civilian deaths during WWII... On the other hand a large part of Israeli forces in early years was composed of Polish officers and soldiers, many of whom deserted Anders' army during its' stay in Palestine in the 1940s.

All in all, Poland was a multi-national state so no wonder its' army was multi-national. It's not that strange in Central Europe after all.
Cheers

User avatar
RG
Member
Posts: 197
Joined: 30 Jun 2006 11:01
Location: Poland

Re: Georgians in Polish Army

Post by RG » 01 Nov 2012 18:29

Today I was in Rakowice Cemetery in Krakow and found a grave of Georgian officer serving in Polish Army.

The inscription reads:

Miko Agniaszwili
son of the noble nation of Georgians
ensign of 4 Regiment of Podhale Riflemen
born in Batumi 14 X 1901
Exiled by Russian violence from his motherland
Died longing for her
in Kraków 5 IX 1928
God give freedom for Georgia!
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Return to “Poland 1919-1945”