Points in US Army

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Raf
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Points in US Army

Post by Raf » 12 Nov 2002 14:31

After V-Day, some soldiers were allowed to go back to the USA immediately, because the had earned enough points. Others had to stay as an occupation force. These points were given for medails and injuries. How did this system worked. How did a GI earned points and how many did he need to go home ?

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Requin Marteau
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Post by Requin Marteau » 12 Nov 2002 19:12

85 points for go home ( 5 points = Bronze Star)

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Andy H
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Post by Andy H » 12 Nov 2002 23:13

Interesting question RAF, and I cant help one iota, though I knew that Aircrew were sent home after so many missions, but I'm not sure if anything similar existed in the Navy?

:? Andy from the Shire

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Raf
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Post by Raf » 13 Nov 2002 08:06

Thanks, Requin. Great help.

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Raf
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Post by Raf » 13 Nov 2002 08:08

Andy H wrote:Interesting question RAF, and I cant help one iota, though I knew that Aircrew were sent home after so many missions, but I'm not sure if anything similar existed in the Navy?

:? Andy from the Shire
I can imagine that there was a system like that in the Navy too. Maybe someone has some information. Aircrew were sent home after 25 missions for bombers and 50 for fighters. Correct me when I'm wrong.

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David C. Clarke
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Post by David C. Clarke » 13 Nov 2002 16:39

Hi Raf, I believe it was 50 missions for Bomber Crews. I'm not certain for fighter pilots, but 50 seems too low for the USAAF in WWII. Best Regards, David

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Raf
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Post by Raf » 13 Nov 2002 16:46

David C. Clarke wrote:Hi Raf, I believe it was 50 missions for Bomber Crews. I'm not certain for fighter pilots, but 50 seems too low for the USAAF in WWII. Best Regards, David
I'm not certain. I have to look it up.

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Daniel L
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Post by Daniel L » 13 Nov 2002 16:53

Didn't they lower those points gradually throughout the end of the war?

regards

Phaethon
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Post by Phaethon » 13 Nov 2002 17:37

Here's a USMC Vet's accounting of his service points:
Next stop was Long Island, NY -- worked in Records and found out I had enough points to get a discharge. Points: 1 point for each month in service, 2 points for each months overseas, 5 points for every ribbon, and 5 points for each additional star. 85 Points were needed for discharge; I had about 125 and received my discharge out of Bainbridge, MD.
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Esta ... 5usmc.html

This site gives detailed information on the demobilization of Dental Corps:
http://www.armymedicine.army.mil/histor ... al/ch9.htm

I haven't dug deeper into this site, there may be more there.

ISTR several tales of USAAF aircrew reaching their target to return home only to find the threshold had been raised. In films, complaints of this happening usually indicated that the crew would be shot down soon.

And didn't Hawkeye suffer a similar moving of the goalposts in MASH?

K.
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Ken Cocker, London

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Andy H
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Post by Andy H » 13 Nov 2002 18:41

Each child under 18 (maximum of 3) 12 points:
No wonder people were keen to go on leave :lol:

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Post by Phaethon » 13 Nov 2002 19:18

Andy H wrote:Each child under 18 (maximum of 3) 12 points:
No wonder people were keen to go on leave :lol:
Yes, the maximum is necessary because the rule does not specify legitimate children or children born to allied/enemy nationals.

K.

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