Id. US bombs

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Sturm78
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Id. US bombs

Post by Sturm78 » 07 Feb 2013 22:59

Hi all,

I need help to identify these US aerial bombs:

Images from Ebay and LIFE
Thanks in advance. Sturm78
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Globalization41
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Re: Id. US bombs

Post by Globalization41 » 10 Feb 2013 03:56


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Takao
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Re: Id. US bombs

Post by Takao » 10 Feb 2013 09:35

The LIFE photo shows the older AN-M44 1000 pounders.
http://maic.jmu.edu/ordata/srdetaildesc.asp?ordid=3063

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Re: Id. US bombs

Post by Sturm78 » 10 Feb 2013 15:36

Thank you, Takao and Globalization41.

Any idea about my first image?

Links do not have too many images to facilitate the identification of the different models. :?

Here, another image from Ebay: I think it is the same model of my first image

Sturm78
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ChristopherPerrien
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Re: Id. US bombs

Post by ChristopherPerrien » 10 Feb 2013 17:00

I venture the first 500lb with the B-26 in the background is an M64 and the second 500lb with the Japanese soldier definitely is an M43.
I would guess that is Clark Field also. The two front bombs look smaller, they are 250lb M57's IMO.

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Re: Id. US bombs

Post by Globalization41 » 10 Feb 2013 17:39

Aerial Dumb Bombs

Excerpts:

Although smart munitions are coming into vastly wider use, the unguided dumb bomb remains a major weapon. Dumb bombs are cheap, and when used by sophisticated strike aircraft, highly effective. They also come in a bewildering variety of forms, optimized for different missions, and can be used as a basis for smart munitions. This chapter and the next provide an overview of dumb bomb technology.

Aerial dumb bombs, as noted, come in a wide variety of forms. They can be in the shape of finned spindles or pills, teardrops, or cans, and a few have been built in the form of spheres. They can consist of a single unit, making them "unitary" bombs, or can carry hundreds of small "submunitions" that are scattered over a target area after release, making them "cluster" bombs. Such submunitions can also be carried by "dispensers" that remain attached to the launch aircraft, with the dispenser scattering the submunitions as the aircraft streaks over the target area at low level. The dispensers are often discarded when empty, since it may be difficult to ensure that all the submunitions have been released, meaning one might pop out when the aircraft lands.

The Americans used their own series of GP bombs during the war, resembling pills with box fins. US GP bombs used early in the war included:

bomb metric english
______ ________________ ______________

M-30 45 kilograms 100 pounds
M-31 135 kilograms 300 pounds
M-34 225 kilograms 500 pounds
M-44 450 kilograms 1,000 pounds
M-34 900 kilograms 2,000 pounds

Later in the war, this series was replaced by improved GP bombs:

bomb metric english
______ ________________ ______________

M-57 113 kilograms 250 pounds
M-64 225 kilograms 500 pounds
M-65 450 kilograms 1,000 pounds
M-66 900 kilograms 2,000 pounds

The most devastating conventional bomb used by the Americans, however, was the M-69 incendiary. The first Boeing B-29 raids against the Japanese mainland were performed in the fall of 1944, using high altitude daylight precision bombing with high explosive bombs. For various reasons, this strategy proved ineffective, and in the spring of 1945 the Army Air Force moved to low level incendiary bombing at night.

[Globalization41.]

ChristopherPerrien
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Re: Id. US bombs

Post by ChristopherPerrien » 10 Feb 2013 21:48

There are designations mixed up in that source.

However I could be wrong in my view of the Japanese soldier picture. It could possibly be from "Singapore", and I have little knowledge of British bomb nomenclature if that is the case. A translation of the writing on the picture would obviously help.
I think the photo is from the Philippines in 1942.

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Takao
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Re: Id. US bombs

Post by Takao » 10 Feb 2013 22:13

Those really look like American bombs, but then again, without a translation, it could very well be taken at a captured airfield somewhere in China. But my first guess would be from the Philippines.

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Re: Id. US bombs

Post by ROLAND1369 » 11 Feb 2013 00:12

From the markings on the bombs which appear to be black on a lighter color as well as their placement and what is readable I believe these are prewar bombs. They most closely resemble the markings used prior to 11 mar 1942, after which the bombs were olive drab with a yellow band on the nose and tail.. and are either in the Phillipines or the dutch east indies. The smaller of the two to me reads 600 lbs for weight. To me these are 600 lb M32 Demolition Bomb and 1100 lb Demolition Bomb M33. These would be more likely to have been present in the Far east in 1941/42. Source OP 1664 Vol II, US Explosive Ordnance 1947.
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Re: Id. US bombs

Post by Sturm78 » 11 Feb 2013 11:24

Thank you to all four yor replies.

600 lb M32 and 1100 lb M33 Demolition Bombs, therefore, for my last image, I supposse

Regards Sturm78

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Re: Id. US bombs

Post by ROLAND1369 » 11 Feb 2013 14:20

That is my conclusion. At the beginning of the war and prewar the service bombs would have been painted all yellow to signify a high explosive filling. The markings were black. New production after 11 March 1942 were painted olive drab with a 1 inch wide yellow ring at the nose and tail and officially a third band at the center of gravity although the third band seems to have been omitted in most cases. Markings were black. Some overlap was present as I have seen pictures of all yellow bombs in use in England during the 1943 period.

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Re: Id. US bombs

Post by ROLAND1369 » 12 Feb 2013 00:43

Just checked the firsst two photos and you can see the three yellow stripes, absent on the Japanese pic.

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Keystone
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Re: Id. US bombs

Post by Keystone » 12 Feb 2013 18:56

I seem to recall that the yellow band near the nose of the bomb indicated that it's explosive filler was RDX rather than the older and less powerful TNT compound.

RDX required different fusing and handling methods as it was much more sensitive.

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Re: Id. US bombs

Post by Globalization41 » 13 Feb 2013 01:09

On page 4 of the following site are bomb color codes. It's a "pdf" file. If I knew how to copy the page to display in the forum, I would.

Aircraft Ordnance

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Re: Id. US bombs

Post by ROLAND1369 » 13 Feb 2013 18:36

The info quote was from the 1946 EOD manual which makes no mention of special markings for RDX loaded bombs. The 1 inch yellow bands are only an indicator of being loaded with a High Explosive. The precise loading of the bomb is indicated by black letter stenciling at aproximently at the Top or middle of the bomb.(see photo). I do agree that the RDX was a dangerous bomb and remember seing some bombs with two rings on the nose which could indicate RDX loading however I have found no paper link for this supposition. Source TM 9-1900 Ammunition General 1956.
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