British Artillery Range Table extract

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Sheldrake
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British Artillery Range Table extract

Postby Sheldrake » 07 Aug 2017 22:21

firing table extracts_LR.jpg
This is from RA XII Corps War Diary. They show the 50% zone and angles of decent for different equipment at different charges. The optimum for the 25 pdr is 9-11,000 yards charge 3.
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Carl Schwamberger
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Re: British Artillery Range Table extract

Postby Carl Schwamberger » 07 Aug 2017 22:44

Why is this optimum?

Aber
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Re: British Artillery Range Table extract

Postby Aber » 08 Aug 2017 06:46

Text on right of table

"It will be seen that 25pdr Charge III gives the best combination of steep angle of descent and small 50% zone at about[7]000 to 11000 yards range"

Presumably steep angle of descent minimises variability in range - how to get densest concentration.

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Re: British Artillery Range Table extract

Postby Sheldrake » 08 Aug 2017 07:41

Aber wrote:Text on right of table

"It will be seen that 25pdr Charge III gives the best combination of steep angle of descent and small 50% zone at about[7]000 to 11000 yards range"

Presumably steep angle of descent minimises variability in range - how to get densest concentration.


Yes - but the angle of descent also matters too. The steeper angle of descent makes results in a better splinter pattern.

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Re: British Artillery Range Table extract

Postby Hoplophile » 08 Aug 2017 12:53

I suspect that, in this instance, the word "optimum" means "highly suitable for a particular type of mission."

Given that the two characteristics mentioned are "steep angle of descent" and a "small 50% zone," the mission in question seems to be one in which the 25-pounders are shooting at relatively small target that is located behind various things that the British gunners wish to avoid hitting. (These might be friendly troops, terrain obstacles, or built-up areas.)

I would not be surprised if this document was created in the course of planning a creeping barrage, whether for an exercise or a battle.

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Re: British Artillery Range Table extract

Postby Sheldrake » 08 Aug 2017 18:36

Hoplophile wrote:I suspect that, in this instance, the word "optimum" means "highly suitable for a particular type of mission."

Given that the two characteristics mentioned are "steep angle of descent" and a "small 50% zone," the mission in question seems to be one in which the 25-pounders are shooting at relatively small target that is located behind various things that the British gunners wish to avoid hitting. (These might be friendly troops, terrain obstacles, or built-up areas.)

I would not be surprised if this document was created in the course of planning a creeping barrage, whether for an exercise or a battle.



This is the dispersion pattern of splinters from a 25 Pdr shell with different angles of descent.
Image

The 25 Pdr is not particularly effective as a means of destroyinga target. But a troop , battery, regiment or divisional artilelry group was a very effective way of neutralising an enemy in a 100 x 100, 150m x 150, 250 x 250 or 350 x 350m area, or as a standard, linear, concentration with 50 yards per gun - 525 yards for a regiment.

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Re: British Artillery Range Table extract

Postby Aber » 11 Aug 2017 19:13

Sheldrake wrote:
Yes - but the angle of descent also matters too. The steeper angle of descent makes results in a better splinter pattern.



Thanks - not something I knew before.


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