Air Combat Slang

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Pips
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Air Combat Slang

Post by Pips » 06 Dec 2022 02:01

There are a number of classic well-known RAF slang words eg beware the hun in the sun, gone west, gone for a burton and so on.

Anyone know of any German air slang?

Tom from Cornwall
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Re: Air Combat Slang

Post by Tom from Cornwall » 13 Dec 2022 17:45

Achtung Spitfeur? At least that’s what my Commando magazines used to say!

Regards

Tom

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Pips
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Re: Air Combat Slang

Post by Pips » 15 Dec 2022 00:36

:)

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Hans1906
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Re: Air Combat Slang

Post by Hans1906 » 15 Dec 2022 17:30

Hi Pips ,

read more from the year 2007: https://ww2aircraft.net/forum/threads/g ... rds.10271/

Josef „Pips“ Priller: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josef_Pri ... gdflieger)


Hans
„Im Leben gibt’s die Bösen und die Guten. Und die dazwischen, das sind die Bagaluten.“

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Hans1906
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Re: Air Combat Slang

Post by Hans1906 » 15 Dec 2022 17:38

The Longest Day / "Pips" Priller



Brilliantly portrayed by the German actor Heinz Reincke... :thumbsup:

Heinz Reincke https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinz_Reincke


Hans
„Im Leben gibt’s die Bösen und die Guten. Und die dazwischen, das sind die Bagaluten.“

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ShindenKai
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Re: Air Combat Slang

Post by ShindenKai » 16 Dec 2022 21:03

Off-the-cuff-

"Bounce" the enemy: to attack quickly from an advantageous position, usually from a higher altitude onto an unaware foe, I believe it also pertains to not diving through or past the enemy, but to pull-up sharply and away to reposition quickly for another attack.

"the merge or merging": usually used when both opponents are aware of each other and closing rapidly, I believe its a more modern term (Jet age).

"Furball": a large aerial engagement with many separate dogfights/fights occurring within it.

"Yo-yoing": extending a maneuver to gain a better position, usually to retain energy.

"Turnin' & burnin'": locked into a dogfight.

"Check 6 or Bogey/Bandit 6 O'clock": maneuver, you've got a bogey on your tail!


Here's more-

https://sierrahotel.net/pages/aviation- ... ilot-slang

https://www.military.com/undertheradar/ ... understand

Leros87
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Re: Air Combat Slang

Post by Leros87 » 19 Dec 2022 16:01

I recalled from reading the book “I flew for the Fuhrer” by Heinz Knoke, a fighter pilot who served mainly on the Western Front from May 1941 and gained 33 kills, that they referred to bandits (usually single aircraft such as photo recon) and later heavy babies (US heavy bombers).

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ShindenKai
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Re: Air Combat Slang

Post by ShindenKai » 05 Jan 2023 06:00

Leros87 wrote:
19 Dec 2022 16:01
I recalled from reading the book “I flew for the Fuhrer” by Heinz Knoke, a fighter pilot who served mainly on the Western Front from May 1941 and gained 33 kills, that they referred to bandits (usually single aircraft such as photo recon) and later heavy babies (US heavy bombers).
Bombers have usually been called "heavies". (By all sides)

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