Id. british gun

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Clive Mortimore
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Re: Id. british gun

Post by Clive Mortimore » 14 Sep 2017 17:24

Sturm78 wrote:Nodody for my last image ??

Well, here another image from Ebay. Not a gun but.. :roll: ..Can somebody identify the mount model of this 12.7mm Vickers machinegun ??

Sturm78
I am not sure of the mounting but it is not in service, the crew are Vickers employees.
Clive

Sturm78
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Re: Id. british gun

Post by Sturm78 » 14 Sep 2017 20:47

Emmanuel wrote
I agree: BL 4-inch Mk. IX.

and 4 in. = 101.6 mm rounded to 102 mm indeed.
Thanks Emmanuel :wink:
Clive wrote
I am not sure of the mounting but it is not in service, the crew are Vickers employees.
Maybe a prototype only ?...

Sturm78

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Re: Id. british gun

Post by Sturm78 » 20 Sep 2017 21:36

Hi all,

I am not sure: 152mm 6in Mk.XIX gun ??

Image from Ebay
Sturm78
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Sturm78
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Re: Id. british gun

Post by Sturm78 » 22 Sep 2017 16:28

Nobody for my last image ?'

Well, here another image. Not a gun but....it is Maxim-Nordenfelt machinegun on a naval mount. Can somebody identify the exact model ?

Image from Vancouver archive
Sturm78
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Clive Mortimore
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Re: Id. british gun

Post by Clive Mortimore » 23 Sep 2017 00:10

Sturm78 wrote:Hi all,

I am not sure: 152mm 6in Mk.XIX gun ??

Image from Ebay
Sturm78
Hi Sturm

It looks like a 6 inch gun.
Clive

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Re: Id. british gun

Post by Sturm78 » 24 Sep 2017 21:27

Clive wrote
It looks like a 6 inch gun.
Thanks, Clive

Sturm78

karlik
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Re: Id. british gun

Post by karlik » 16 Nov 2017 20:46

Hi!
Id please this gun
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Knouterer
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Re: Id. british gun

Post by Knouterer » 17 Nov 2017 10:52

karlik wrote:Hi!
Id please this gun
Interesting - it looks like a 6-pounder mounted on the carriage of a 2-pounder anti-tank gun (early Mark I carriage). When invasion threatened in the summer and autumn of 1940 the British army was very short of anti-tank guns. There was however a large number of WWI 6pdr tank guns in store (about 600, mostly unused) which were mounted in pillboxes and on armoured trains, but also on improvised wheeled carriages. Originally, in WWI, these short-barreled guns fired only HE and canister, for use against machine gun nests &c, but in 1940 solid shot was also issued. However, in view of the low muzzle velocity (about 415 m/s), it was in all likelihood (much) less effective in the AT role than the 2pdr. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QF_6_pound ... _Hotchkiss
According to David Fletcher, the “short” 6pdr as adopted in January 1917 had a muzzle velocity of 1,350 fps (411 m/sec) and with solid shot could penetrate an estimated 1.2 inches (30 mm) of armour at 500 m.
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Knouterer
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Re: Id. british gun

Post by Knouterer » 17 Nov 2017 11:05

For direct comparison, a drawing of the 2pdr on Mk I carriage, from the Osprey booklet British Anti-tank Artillery 1939-45, by Chris Henry.
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karlik
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Re: Id. british gun

Post by karlik » 17 Nov 2017 11:28

Thank you very much!

Knouterer
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Re: Id. british gun

Post by Knouterer » 17 Nov 2017 22:19

Sturm78 wrote:Hi all,

I am not sure: 152mm 6in Mk.XIX gun ??

Image from Ebay
Sturm78
I's a 7.2 inch howitzer: https://collection.nam.ac.uk/detail.php ... -63-19-122
"The true spirit of conversation consists in building on another man's observation, not overturning it." Edward George Bulwer-Lytton

Clive Mortimore
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Re: Id. british gun

Post by Clive Mortimore » 18 Nov 2017 00:47

Knouterer wrote:
Sturm78 wrote:Hi all,

I am not sure: 152mm 6in Mk.XIX gun ??

Image from Ebay
Sturm78
I's a 7.2 inch howitzer: https://collection.nam.ac.uk/detail.php ... -63-19-122
Hi Knouterer

I think Sturm is right and it is a 6 inch gun. The Scammell towing it is carrying civilian number plates, only issued to pre war vehicles. Most of these were lost during the fall of France and those remaining in the UK would have had them removed by 1942 when the 7.2 inch was introduced.

Plus the barrel looks a wee bit too long for a 7.2 inch MkI toIV.
Clive

Clive Mortimore
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Re: Id. british gun

Post by Clive Mortimore » 18 Nov 2017 00:51

Knouterer wrote:
karlik wrote:Hi!
Id please this gun
Interesting - it looks like a 6-pounder mounted on the carriage of a 2-pounder anti-tank gun (early Mark I carriage). When invasion threatened in the summer and autumn of 1940 the British army was very short of anti-tank guns. There was however a large number of WWI 6pdr tank guns in store (about 600, mostly unused) which were mounted in pillboxes and on armoured trains, but also on improvised wheeled carriages. Originally, in WWI, these short-barreled guns fired only HE and canister, for use against machine gun nests &c, but in 1940 solid shot was also issued. However, in view of the low muzzle velocity (about 415 m/s), it was in all likelihood (much) less effective in the AT role than the 2pdr. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QF_6_pound ... _Hotchkiss
According to David Fletcher, the “short” 6pdr as adopted in January 1917 had a muzzle velocity of 1,350 fps (411 m/sec) and with solid shot could penetrate an estimated 1.2 inches (30 mm) of armour at 500 m.
karlik wrote:Hi!
Id please this gun
Wow both those photos of the WW1 tank 6 pdr are great.
Clive

Knouterer
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Re: Id. british gun

Post by Knouterer » 18 Nov 2017 10:13

Clive Mortimore wrote:
Knouterer wrote:
Sturm78 wrote:Hi all,

I am not sure: 152mm 6in Mk.XIX gun ??

Image from Ebay
Sturm78
I's a 7.2 inch howitzer: https://collection.nam.ac.uk/detail.php ... -63-19-122
Hi Knouterer

I think Sturm is right and it is a 6 inch gun. The Scammell towing it is carrying civilian number plates, only issued to pre war vehicles. Most of these were lost during the fall of France and those remaining in the UK would have had them removed by 1942 when the 7.2 inch was introduced.

Plus the barrel looks a wee bit too long for a 7.2 inch MkI toIV.
Well, I may be wrong, it's a bit hard to tell ....
"The true spirit of conversation consists in building on another man's observation, not overturning it." Edward George Bulwer-Lytton

Knouterer
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Re: Id. british gun

Post by Knouterer » 18 Nov 2017 11:21

Two more pictures of a "short" 6pdr, at the seafront at Bognor Regis in 1940 (both from A. Saunders, Bognor at War). The carriage - possibly cobbled together in a railway workshop, or something like that - looks similar to the picture above, but the wheels are different. In both cases taken off some civilian vehicle, I suppose.

The soldiers may be from the 5th Medium Regiment, which was not yet re-equipped with bigger guns and had a detachment with seven 6pdrs in this area in Sept-Oct 1940, as part of "Brocforce".
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