The Man James Bond Was Based On Has Died

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Psycho Mike
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The Man James Bond Was Based On Has Died

Post by Psycho Mike » 15 Oct 2003 14:22

http://edition.cnn.com/2003/WORLD/europ ... index.html

A British war hero, said to have been the inspiration behind secret agent James Bond, has died aged 90, British newspapers have reported.

Former Royal Navy Lieutenant Commander Patrick Dalzel-Job carried out a series of daring exploits behind enemy lines during the Second World War including some while serving under author Ian Fleming, who created the 007 character.

Although he never claimed to be the real James Bond, Fleming had told him he was the model for the heroic spy, the Guardian newspaper said.

Dalzel-Job's real life adventures certainly read like a James Bond novel.

In one of most daring exploits in 1940, he disobeyed orders to rescue all the women, children and elderly residents from the Norwegian town of Narvik in local boats just before it was destroyed in a German bombing raid.

He only avoided a court martial after the King of Norway sent his personal thanks and awarded him the Knight's Cross of St Olav.

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Locke
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Post by Locke » 15 Oct 2003 15:27

May he rest in peace.

He was really an extraordinary man.

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Matt H.
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Post by Matt H. » 15 Oct 2003 15:31

Indeed. Most extraordinary exploits.

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Psycho Mike
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Post by Psycho Mike » 15 Oct 2003 15:44

He wrote a book too.

http://snurl.com/2oj7

Here is a review of it:
In this, 'one of the most romantic stories of the war-time years', Patrick Dalzel-Job tells how — as a very young man in 1939 — he sailed a small brigantine along the Arctic coast of Norway as far as the Russian border, with only an aged mother and a blue-eyed little Norwegian schoolgirl as crew.
In 4½ years of war that followed that experience, Patrick had many adventures. In 1940, with his special knowledge of North Norway's coast and language, he landed and moved more than 10,000 soldiers of the Allied North West Expeditionary Force in local boats, without the loss of a single man; then, acting against specific orders from Allied Headquarters, he used his boats to take all the women, children and old people out of Narvik just before that town was destroyed by German bombers.
He escaped Court Martial for disobeying orders because the King of Norway sent personal thanks through the British Admiralty and himself presented Patrick with the Knight's Cross of St Olav.
Later adventures, all told with a clarity that brings everything to life, included a week alone on a Norwegian island, taking photographs of enemy shipping.
In 1944/45, Patrick commanded a team of Ian Fleming's '30 AU', often working far ahead of Allied lines in France and Germany (some people have said that Patrick Dalzel-Job was the original 'James Bond' of Ian Fleming's books and films).
In June 1945, Patrick Dalzel-Job managed to return to Norway, there to search for the blue-eyed schoolgirl of his Arctic sailing days. After much difficulty, he eventually found the girl, now a beautiful young woman. Within three weeks — Patrick having survived further hazards in the meantime — they were married in Oslo. The Epilogue is both happy and sad.

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'It is a fascinating tale, so vividly written and excellently illustrated by your wide variety of photographs . . . will have place of honour in the Queen Mother's Library.'
(Private Secretary to HM The Queen Mother)
'A gripping memoir and one of the most romantic love stories of the war-time years.'
(John Keegan, Defence Correspondent of The Daily Telegraph and author of 'The Face of Battle')
'Very, very seldom have I enjoyed a book as much. . .'
(Professor R V Jones, one of Churchill's 'backroom boys')
'His are memoirs like no others . . . terrific book.'
(Shaun Usher in The Daily Mail)
'It tells of great themes, war and death and violence, yes — but there is also love and peace and life and gentleness.'
(Peter Jemmett in The Yorkshire Evening Post)
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August
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Post by August » 15 Oct 2003 15:51

I read somwhere that Ian pattern James on a number of people. Like his elder brother Peter Flemming. Peter was in intelligence services.

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Psycho Mike
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Post by Psycho Mike » 15 Oct 2003 17:02

As far as I know Fleming (who was quite the Bond himself- read this) :

http://www.channel4.com/history/microsi ... _bond.html

only acknowledged Dalzel - Job but it wouldn't surprise me that there were others.

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August
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Post by August » 16 Oct 2003 11:41

Mike, thanks for the link.

I go with the view that Ian based Bond on a number of people. One would not know the real thing as these intelligence fellows never tell the whole story.

BTW, check this:

http://www.weekender.co.jp/new/020215/o ... 20215.html

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Eightball
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Post by Eightball » 17 Oct 2003 00:18

May he R.I.P. He certanley deserves it.

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Grand Admiral
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Post by Grand Admiral » 22 Oct 2003 19:37

Not to burst anyone's bubble, but I thought that Ian Fleming based James Bond on Fitzroy MacLean, the British commando?

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Psycho Mike
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Post by Psycho Mike » 24 Oct 2003 15:38

Vera Atkins- the woman Miss Moneypenny was based on:
http://www.pharo.com/intelligence/vera_ ... uction.asp

Her New York Times bio- and the man M was based on.... http://www.mishalov.com/Atkins.html

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Psycho Mike
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Post by Psycho Mike » 25 Oct 2003 21:01

Angelina Jolie to play the new Bond girl!

http://www.teenhollywood.com/d.asp?r=51457&cat=1027

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Soldat84
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Post by Soldat84 » 02 Nov 2003 00:28

Wow, quite heroic that Mr. Dalzel-Job. May he rest in peace. It just shows that so many men and women had perfomed so heroically during the Second World War and didn't get the recognition they deserved.

But Mr Dalzel-Job did, he even got thanked by a king!

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