DOWs and other statements by Native-American nations

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Hama
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DOWs and other statements by Native-American nations

Post by Hama » 20 Dec 2017 20:31

In the book 'Crossing the Pond: The Native American Effort in World War II' the author mentions that in 1942 the Iroquois Six Nations declared war on the Axis powers. Similarly the Oklahoma Osage, Oklahoma Ponca, and South Dakota Sioux also issued DOWs against the Axis. I was wondering if anyone knows of any other First Nations, either in the USA or Canada, who made similar declarations at any point during WW2?

Also, I know that there were scattered individual cases of Natives resisting the draft, but I have my doubts if the sentiment extended up to government level in any of the nations. Has anyone heard of any First Nations governments issuing statements against the draft or 'declarations of neutrality'?

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Re: DOWs and other statements by Native-American nations

Post by henryk » 21 Dec 2017 20:36

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/e ... /[quote]In 1939, Canada declared war and began building militarily and economically for the Allied cause (see Second World War). Once again, Indigenous youth volunteered in the thousands, more still were conscripted, and communities contributed to the national war effort. Arguably, the scale and diversity of Indigenous engagement in the war effort was greater in this conflict, but so to was the breadth and determination of opposition to conscription. As in 1914–18, more is known of Status Indians’ service and experiences, as most Métis were not recorded, and few Inuit served. Indian Affairs figures for First Nations enlistments note 3,090, but these figures were woefully incomplete. The numbers for Status Indians were closer to 4,300; the figures for other Indigenous groups are impossible to pinpoint, but may have totalled a few thousand. Once again, Indigenous military servicemen and women generally experienced respect, acceptance and promotion in the forces. Brigadier Oliver Martin, a Mohawk from the Six Nations Grand River reserve, was the highest-ranking Indigenous officer of the war.
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Once France surrendered in June 1940, Canada accelerated and expanded its military commitment, and initiated conscription for home defence in September 1940 (see National Resources Mobilization Act). After some uncertainty, Status Indians were included in mandatory military training and military service in Canada. First Nations leaders remembered the limited exemption in 1918 and protested that it was unjust to compel people without citizenship rights to fight to defend those same rights. Nevertheless, this policy remained unchanged until late 1944, when the conscription crisis forced Prime Minister Mackenzie King to begin sending conscripts into combat overseas, including Status Indians. This, however, violated promises made during negotiation of several historical treaties and Indian Affairs requested a limited exemption for Status Indian conscripts, which was passed in December 1944. The exemption covered only recruits from Treaties 3, 6, 8 and 11, roughly one-fifth of the Status Indian population (in the Prairies and Northwest Territories). Relatively few Indigenous men were included in the 2,463 conscripts that actually saw combat in 1945. While anti-climactic, conscription remained a major concern for Indigenous people throughout the war.
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While collaboration marked the majority of Indigenous experience of the Second World War, not all were enthusiastic about joining the cause. Even amongst those supportive, their willingness to contribute was neither unlimited nor unconditional. Wartime taxation and lingering prewar grievances plagued Indigenous–government relations, but conscription inspired more resistance than any other issue. Across the country, and throughout the war, Indigenous communities protested conscription. Young men ignored their call to report for medical examination and avoided authorities (sometimes with support from community elders), and one violent riot broke out when the RCMP tried to arrest draft evaders from the Kahnawake Reserve south of Montréal. [/quote]

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Re: DOWs and other statements by Native-American nations

Post by Hama » 25 Dec 2017 21:09

Thanks for sharing that, very interesting info there.

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