Brazil

Discussions on the Allies and the Neutral States in general and the countries that does not have sections of their own.
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gavmeister13
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Brazil

Post by gavmeister13 » 26 Sep 2003 10:32

In WWII was Brazil involved and if so on which side [Axis/Allied]?

Gwynn Compton
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Post by Gwynn Compton » 26 Sep 2003 11:34

From memory Brazil joined the Allied war effort in 1943, and eventually contributed a division to the Italian campaign, as well as naval efforts in the Atlantic.

Gwynn

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Barkhorn
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Post by Barkhorn » 26 Sep 2003 14:57

Gwynn Compton wrote:From memory Brazil joined the Allied war effort in 1943, and eventually contributed a division to the Italian campaign, as well as naval efforts in the Atlantic.

Gwynn
My granpa has served in Italy with the Brazilian Expeditionary Force (FEB). :wink:

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gavmeister13
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Post by gavmeister13 » 26 Sep 2003 21:00

How well did they do in Italy?

regards

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Orok
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Post by Orok » 26 Sep 2003 21:10

I might be wrong but I remember that the Brazilian government was openly sympathetic with the Axis causes until a number of their merchant ships were sunk by German U-boats. This made them change mind and Brazil eventually joined the Allied camp. :D

Regards!

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Xavier
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yes

Post by Xavier » 26 Sep 2003 21:22

Yes, can someone please post a list of non-beligerant ships sunk in the south-atlantic, caribean-gulf of mexico area?

or direct us to a place with such info. (even more general..)?

Thanks in advance

Xavier

the link scrounger

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Raquitico
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Post by Raquitico » 28 Sep 2003 00:02

Orok wrote:I might be wrong but I remember that the Brazilian government was openly sympathetic with the Axis causes until a number of their merchant ships were sunk by German U-boats. This made them change mind and Brazil eventually joined the Allied camp. :D

Regards!

This was a excuse that the brazilian gov. used to enter int the war.
The real reason to Brazil fight against the Axis is because the USA give a lot of money. This money, for example, was used to construct a great siderurgical park: the CSN - Compania Siderurgica Nacional.

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Jeremy Chan
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Post by Jeremy Chan » 06 Oct 2003 07:18

What equipment were the Brazilian forces using then?

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Von_Mannteufel
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Post by Von_Mannteufel » 09 Oct 2003 08:44

in 1940-1941 Brazil stoped trading with germany (only the weapons bought were still "traded"). in 42 Brazil ceeded an airbase to the Allies and cut relations with germany and in '43 it declarred war on the axis. Brazillian troops fought in Italy under US 5th army.

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tigre
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Re: Brazil

Post by tigre » 22 Jun 2020 18:54

Hello to all :D; just a little on this................................

Brazil, the difficult march towards war.

Summer Wells emphasized that Brazil was a friend and an important ally of the USA and it was entitled to receive on loan all the appropriate military equipment for her needs, such as fighters, reconnaissance planes and medium-sized bombers, tanks, and coastal artillery. Roosevelt confirmed the accuracy of the position taken by his undersecretary and agreed with the Brazilian demands, albeit without enthusiasm.

When President Roosevelt broke the silence by assuring his commitment to supply updated equipment to the armed forces, Brazil finally broke diplomatic relations with Germany, Italy, and Japan on the last day of the Rio Conference on January 28, 1942. Later declared war on August 1942.

Sources: Getulio Vargas Depôe o Brasil na Segunda Guerra Mundial. Sérgio Oliveira. Outubro de 1996.
BRAZIL THE HARD ROAD TO WAR. RIO CONFERENCE JAN 42.
https://tokdehistoria.files.wordpress.c ... .jpg?w=474

Cheers. Raúl M 8-).
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Kingfish
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Re:

Post by Kingfish » 01 Jul 2020 01:50

Jeremy Chan wrote:
06 Oct 2003 07:18
What equipment were the Brazilian forces using then?
The Brazilians were equipped and organized as a standard US infantry division.
The gods do not deduct from a man's allotted span the hours spent in fishing.
~Babylonian Proverb

Infantryman Productions
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Re: Brazil

Post by Infantryman Productions » 05 Jul 2021 03:17

Brazil was Equiped with U.S Gear and Uniform with a Few Changes, Like the Canteen and the Boots. Also the Patch of Brazil and a Patch of the American 5th Army.

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Waleed Y. Majeed
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Re: Brazil

Post by Waleed Y. Majeed » 05 Jul 2021 07:55


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tigre
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Re: Brazil

Post by tigre » 26 Feb 2023 19:50

Hello to all :D; just a little more..............................

The Brazilian Navy in World War II.

Wartime Expansion.

Like most countries, Brazil was at first naturally confused by the prewar appeasement attitude of the European democracies, but intensified preparations began with the outbreak of fighting in Europe. The first step was the patrol of Brazilian coasts, and the expansion of naval technical abilities. Her fleet at that time consisted of 2 dreadnaught-type battleships (Sâo Paulo y Minas Geraes); 2 light cruisers (Bahia y Rio Grande do Sul; 10 destroyers (not all completed); 3 submarines; 12 corvettes; and 10 auxiliary, mine and river vesels. Additional craft were being completed abroad, but these were taken over by the various countries for their own use.

Brazil's merchant marine was sizable 305 vessels totaling 487,000 tons, which was increased to 652,000 tons before the end of 1941. Because many of these ships were carrying supplies destined for the democratic countries of Europe, vicious, indiscriminate Axis attacks by submarine and air began as early as March 1941.

These increased sharply, after Brazil severed Axis relations following the Pearl Harbor attack upon the United States. It was evidently realized by Germany that her sympathy with the democratic cause were but indications of her coming declaration of war, which occurred in August 1942.

Convoy and patrol tasks.

Naval priority was at first given to the rushing of more troops and supplies to the new mainland and island bases along the northeast coast that bulged out toward Africa. Before the end of the year, even United States forces were operating at, or from, many of these bases. And for the sake of combat unity, the northern force of Brazil's Navy was voluntarily merged into the Allied Fourth Fleet (*). The principal base was at Recife, but numerous other, ports helped out considerably. Brazil's southern force, although smaller, also had a tremendous convoy and patrol job. It was based at Rio de Janeiro, where United States vessels happening through that area were sometimes serviced.

Although Brazil had over 4,000 miles of her own coast line to guard, nevertheless on 18 January 1943, her war vessels extended their convoy duty another 1,500 miles northward to Trinidad, where many great convoys were made up. Most of the gasoline and oil used in the North African and Mediterranean campaigns were among the valuable cargoes escorted. Yet the raw materials coming north to the United States from the south were probably of still greater importance. Eventually, all of the South Atlantic convoy duty was turned over to the Brazilian Navy, an act which relieved still other United States and British vessels for urgently needed service elsewhere.

The Brazilian Navy, alone, and in conjunction with the United States Navy guarded 3,167 ships in 614 convoys, totaling 16,500,000 tons - and this with a loss of not one-tenth of one percent.

To further illustrate the importance of the task, here is the national distribution of the tonnage covered:
Ship Nationality - Tonnage
American - 6,884,823
Brazilian - 6,138,506
British - 1,618,299
Panamanian - 933,082
Norwegian - 301.600
Swedish - 233,008
Dutch - 140,538
Lithuanian - 77,300
Belgian - 73.976
Greek - 27,793
Yugoslavian - 16.601
Polish - 6,606
Egyptian - 8.969
Uruguayan - 8,268
Peruvian - 2,7681942.

(*) U.S. 4th Fleet was first established in in 1943 when Adm. Ernest King announced a redesignation of U.S. Naval operating forces, with even-numbered fleets specified for the Atlantic and odd-numbered fleets in the Pacific. U.S. 4th Fleet’s mission was to protect the vital allied shipping lanes in the South Atlantic that was being terrorized by German U-boats. It was also responsible to combat surface raiders and blockade runners. It was first headquartered in Brazil, who were the only South American country to actively support the Allied effort.
https://www.jacksonville.com/story/news ... 649576007/

Sources: Military Review. January 1951.

Cheers. Raúl M 8-).

Lethl215
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Re: Brazil

Post by Lethl215 » 27 Feb 2023 18:50

Recife and Natal were being developed as bases before US entry. Patoka (AO9) was already at Recife on 7 Dec 41 acting as tanker, cargo and stores ship for TF-3 which was based out of Trinidad BWI at this time. During diplomatic visit by the USN prior to establishing bases the Brazilians were very averse to the British but more accommodating to the Americans. Before PH, Clemson (AVD4) was at Natal preparing to support VPBs. Thrush (AVP3) was at Para acting as a transport. She arrived Natal mid-month carrying the 18th Prov Marine Co. She was joined by Greene (AVD13) by the end of Dec which relieved Clemson to provide support for 6 VPB of VP-52 which arrived mid Dec 41. TG-3.6 (Omaha (CL4) and Somers (DD381)) were at sea enroute to Recife prior to PH also arriving mid Dec along with Davis (DD395). With a lot of moving parts, Brazil was already factoring into Atlantic war plans as a base of operations prior to US entry. The South Atlantic Force (TF-3) developed these bases further so that most ships operated out of Brazil as the war progressed.

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