Lieutenant-General Juliusz Rommel

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Benoit Douville
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Lieutenant-General Juliusz Rommel

Post by Benoit Douville » 26 Aug 2002 03:33

I am looking for info about this Polish General who was involved in the campaign of september 1939 against the Germans. He was commanding the Lodz and the Warsaw army and that's all i know. Anymore info, pics, or anything would be greatly appreciated.

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Graf von Dracula
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Post by Graf von Dracula » 26 Aug 2002 17:51

from: http://www.strategypage.com/cic/docs/cic83b.asp#two



Erwin Rommel is well known as the brilliant officer who commanded the German 7th Panzer Division during the 1940 Campaign, and then went on the earn the sobriquet "Desert Fox" at the head of the Afrika Korps in 1941-1943, before taking command of the forces occupying France on the eve of D-Day in 1944, only to be forced to suicide in the aftermath of the famous “July Plot” against Hitler’s life.

But there was another General Rommel in World War II, Lt. Gen. Juliusz Rommel, of the Polish Army.

During the last post-war years Rommel had actually served as Inspector General of the Polish Army, effectively the highest ranking officer in the service. When the Germans invaded Poland, on September 1, 1939, he commanded the “Lodz” Army, five infantry divisions, plus a brigade of infantry and two of cavalry, deployed on the central portion of the German-Polish frontier. Under pressure from the German onslaught, Rommel fell back to cover Warsaw, of which he was shortly appointed military governor. Given four more infantry divisions, weak units composed mostly of reservists, Rommel had orders to defend the city to the last. The Germans put enormous resources against Warsaw, virtually destroying the against the invading Germans until forced to surrender the devastated city on September 27, 1939, though not before arranging to organize an underground resistance army, what became the Polish “Home Army,” which staged an heroic but ultimately unsuccessful uprising in Warsaw in 1944.

Amazingly, this Rommel – more correctly “Rómmel” – survived nearly six years (1939-1945), as a prisoner of the Germans. Rommel was one of over 5,000 other Polish prisoners – including 22 other generals – liberated when American troops overran a large P/W camp at Murnau. Afterwards he lived in retirement, dieing in 1967, at well over 80 years of age.

It’s not know if the two Rommels were related. While the name is not as common as some, it isn’t exactly rare. Nevertheless, the German Rommel was from Swabia, a poor area in southwestern Germany from which many people migrated, not only to America but in earlier times to other parts of Europe as well.


BEST REGARDS!

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Benoit Douville
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Post by Benoit Douville » 27 Aug 2002 00:14

Thanks for the info my Spanish friend. Yep, there was another Rommel during World War II that a lot of people never heard of it unfortunately.

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Csaba Becze
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Post by Csaba Becze » 29 Aug 2002 13:51

I have heard about Juliusz Rómmel, but I found just this here:

http://www.generals.dk/Poland.htm

I have some other stuffz about he and the Polish campaign at home.

Csaba

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Benoit Douville
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Post by Benoit Douville » 29 Aug 2002 21:53

Csaba Becze,

What kind of stuff do you have? If you have other info about Rommel and the Polish campaign let me know.

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Csaba Becze
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Post by Csaba Becze » 11 Sep 2002 13:26

Rómmel was the commander of the Lódz Army. It contained 5 infantry divisions and two cavalry brigades. This Army fought against the german 10th Army (led by Gen. von Reichenau)

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Musashi
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Post by Musashi » 21 Dec 2002 14:00

Hola amigos!
Your informations are incomplete and little wrong.
Army "£ód¼" had not 5 infantry divisions, but FOUR. I AM COMPLETELY SURE.

1. elite 2nd Infantry Division of Legions from Kielce (that division fought successfuly against 3 German infantry divisions at the same time many times).
2. 10th Infantry Division from £ód¼
3. 28th Infantry Division from Warsaw
4. 30th Infantry Division from Polesie
and 2 cavalry brigades:
1. Wo³yñska Brygada Kawalerii (famous of Battle of Mokra, where it defeated German 4th Armoured Division).
2. Kresowa Brygada Kawalerii

The army had been attacked by WHOLE German 8th Army(10th, 17th, 24th, 30th Inf. Div.) and a half of big 10th Army (14th,18th,19th Infantry Divisions; 13rd, 29th Motorised Divisions; 1st Light Division; 1st, 4th Armoured Divisions).
OVERALL: 7 infantry divisions, 2 armoured divisions, 2 motorised divisions and 1 light division, supported by strong aviation. In the addition a few German infantry divisions were in reserve (probably three).

Don't forget about heroic defense of Modlin stronghold by Army "£od¼"
(until 29 IX).
In my opinion Juliusz Rómmel was a very brilliant general stopping for
many days so strong German forces.

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