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SiG I
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Post by SiG I » 04 Jun 2005 17:18

Hi Musashi! The answer is:
4th Destroyer Flotilla (HMS Cossack, HMS Maori, HMS Sikh, HMS Zulu and Polish destroyer Piorun)
Bye!

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Musashi
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Post by Musashi » 04 Jun 2005 19:42

SiG I wrote:Hi Musashi! The answer is:
4th Destroyer Flotilla (HMS Cossack, HMS Maori, HMS Sikh, HMS Zulu and Polish destroyer Piorun)
Bye!
Hi SiG I!
Of course your answer is correct. Over to you :) BTW, Piorun means thunderbolt in Polish.

More detalis:
25 May, 1941
The 4th Destroyer Flotilla comprising the British destroyers HMS Cossack, HMS Maori, HMS Sikh, HMS Zulu and the Polish destroyer Piorun was escorting convoy WS-8B when they recieved an order to leave the convoy and take part in the hunt for the German battleship Bismarck.

26 May, 1941
At 11.00 AM Capt. Vian (in HMS Cossack) recieved a radio report about the position of the Bismarck. He realized that the 4th Destroyer Flotilla was only 50 miles away and ordered to chase the enemy. Due to bad weather and high waves, the destroyers were able to maintain 27 knots speed (only two knots more than Bismarck), but continued the pursuit. Fortunately, British aircraft managed to hit the enemy with two torpedoes. One of them jammed the rudder and damaged the screws. The allied destroyers steamed in line formation, one about 25 cables from another. In darkness, Piorun lost contact with her British partners. At 2214hours lookouts spotted a large ship which indentified herself as HMS Sheffield. At 2237 lookouts detected another large ship. The Polish commanding officer Cdr. Plawski was afraid of attacking the unidentified vessel, because it could be HMS Sheffield again. Piorun used an Aldis lamp to transmit a signal. The answer was 6" gunfire, The detected ship was the Bismarck!!! Cdr. Plawski ordered to open fire with the six 4.7" guns. During 59 minutes Piorun continued transmitting radio reports and traded fire with German battleship achieving several hits. Of course, 4.7" shells were able only to destroy some light AA guns, but not to penetrate heavy armor. The Polish destroyer was making lot of evasive manouvers, because Bismarck also used her 15" main armament. The British destroyers appeared on scene and conducted a torpedo attack against the Geran battleship. But all torpedoes missed the target. At 2336hours Piorun lost contact with the enemy.

27 May, 1941
Piorun continued searching for the German battleship, but only detected her own flagship HMS Cossack. At 05.00 AM Capt. Vian ordered Piorun to break off the action and return to base due to fuel shortage. However, the Polish destroyer tried to find the enemy for one more hour. At 06.00 AM Cdr. Plawski ordered to change course and head for Plymouth.

28 May, 1941
Piorun reached Plymouth with only 37 tons of fuel left in her tanks.
http://uboat.net/allies/warships/ship/5423.html

SiG I
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Post by SiG I » 05 Jun 2005 09:16

Thank you, Musashi!
New question: what was special about the No 7 bomber Squadron of the RAF?
Good Luck!

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Andy H
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Post by Andy H » 05 Jun 2005 11:22

It was a Pathfinder Sqn!

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SiG I
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Post by SiG I » 05 Jun 2005 18:48

Yes, but there was something that distinguished it from other pathfinder squadrons.
Hint: equippment.
Good Luck!

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Oracle
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Possible answer

Post by Oracle » 05 Jun 2005 22:01

At the outbreak of World War II, the squadron was equipped with Handley Page Hampdens, until August 1940, when it equipped with the RAF's first four engined bomber, the Short Stirling Mk I - becoming the first RAF squadron to be equipped with four engined bombers. The first raid by No.7 was 10th February 1941 on Rotterdam. The squadron settled down to a night bombing role, adding mine laying to its duties in 1942. Later with four other squadrons, it formed the nucleus of the new Pathfinder Force, its task to find and accurately mark targets with flares. In May 1943, the Stirling (which was handicapped by a low operational ceiling - it had to fly through flak rather than over it) was gradually replaced by the Avro Lancaster, which No.7 used in Peenemunde in August. From June1944 and until the end of the war, the squadron also undertook a daylight operational role in support of land forces in France and the low countries, and against V-1 and V-2 sites.
It would appear that they used Stirling III s from March 1943 until Lancaster I and III s were used from May 1943? So could the answer be 'Stirling III s used in the Pathfinder role' or am I totally barmy?

SiG I
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Re: Possible answer

Post by SiG I » 06 Jun 2005 19:40

Oracle wrote:
At the outbreak of World War II, the squadron was equipped with Handley Page Hampdens, until August 1940, when it equipped with the RAF's first four engined bomber, the Short Stirling Mk I - becoming the first RAF squadron to be equipped with four engined bombers. The first raid by No.7 was 10th February 1941 on Rotterdam. The squadron settled down to a night bombing role, adding mine laying to its duties in 1942. Later with four other squadrons, it formed the nucleus of the new Pathfinder Force, its task to find and accurately mark targets with flares. In May 1943, the Stirling (which was handicapped by a low operational ceiling - it had to fly through flak rather than over it) was gradually replaced by the Avro Lancaster, which No.7 used in Peenemunde in August. From June1944 and until the end of the war, the squadron also undertook a daylight operational role in support of land forces in France and the low countries, and against V-1 and V-2 sites.
It would appear that they used Stirling III s from March 1943 until Lancaster I and III s were used from May 1943? So could the answer be 'Stirling III s used in the Pathfinder role' or am I totally barmy?
Yes, you got it, the No.7 was the only Stirling equipped squadron in the Pathfinder force. Congratulations, the next question is yours!

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Oracle
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A first?

Post by Oracle » 06 Jun 2005 19:55

In the spring of 1940 at the funeral of Major-General Andersen, the Adjutant-General in the National Defence Headquarters, Ottawa, Canada, what was probably used for the first time to pull the gun carriage with the coffin on?

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Re: A first?

Post by Shuffler » 06 Jun 2005 21:08

Oracle wrote:In the spring of 1940 at the funeral of Major-General Andersen, the Adjutant-General in the National Defence Headquarters, Ottawa, Canada, what was probably used for the first time to pull the gun carriage with the coffin on?
Was it that the gun carriage was motor-drawn?

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Oracle
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Yes but...

Post by Oracle » 06 Jun 2005 22:05

... for the complete answer what type of motor vehicle? The clue is in the 'gun carriage'!! If there is no 1000% answer in two days then you have the next go as it was a very good answer.

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Re: Yes but...

Post by Shuffler » 06 Jun 2005 22:39

Oracle wrote:... for the complete answer what type of motor vehicle? The clue is in the 'gun carriage'!! If there is no 1000% answer in two days then you have the next go as it was a very good answer.
In that case I'd guess an artillery prime mover?

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Michael Emrys
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Post by Michael Emrys » 07 Jun 2005 04:49

Specifically the one commonly known as the Quad.

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Oracle
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Well done!

Post by Oracle » 07 Jun 2005 08:02

The pilot model Chevrolet Gun Tractor, Model 8440 was used to tow the gun carriage. This pilot model was indeed based on the Morris-Commercial C8/AWD and Guy Quad Ant 'Quad' Gun Tractors, and was know colloquially along with its cousin the Ford Gun Tractor as a 'Quad' as a consequence.

Over to you and out!

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Aufklarung
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Post by Aufklarung » 07 Jun 2005 11:53

Could that also have been called a FAT?

regards
A :)

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Oracle
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FAT!

Post by Oracle » 07 Jun 2005 12:42

The designation Field Artillery Tractor, or 'F.A.T.' was a War Department designation originally applied to 6-wheeler tractors or 'Dragons' since about 1928 with the Morris-Commercial C series, and Leyland Terrier, etc. By 1936 the 4-wheeler 4 x 4 FAT was being trialled as offering better performace if not comparable at lower price and by 1938 the 6-wheeler FAT was effectively obsolete although brought back for Light AA [40mm Bofors] Tractors and Breakdown trucks. The Chevrolet and Ford Canadian Military Pattern FATs were indigenous developments of the British designs.

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