The Restoration of S 130: The Last German Motor Torpedo Boat

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mahross
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The Restoration of S 130: The Last German Motor Torpedo Boat

Post by mahross » 23 Feb 2013 17:38

The Second World War Military Operations Research Group is pleased to announce the publication of the first in its series of occasional research papers. As part of its process of active engagement these papers are available to download on the website.

https://secondworldwaroperationsresearc ... ch-papers/

The first paper was written by Dr Harry Bennett of Plymouth University and is on the subject of ‘The Restoration of S 130: The Last German Motor Torpedo Boat of the Second World War’. Here is the abstract of the paper.
In 2009 S 130, British millionaire Kevin Wheatcroft acquired the last surviving German Schnellboot of the Second World War. The historical significance of the boat was considerable. The original design dated to the late 1920s and used ground breaking engineering to produce a boat capable of speeds in excess of 40 knots. From 1940 to 1944, the schnellboote had proved a highly effective weapon against the coastal convoys on which Britain’s war economy depended. This research paper explores the developing relationship between University of Plymouth and the Wheatcroft Collection as they collaborate to preserve sole surviving Schnellboot, S 130. It examines the processes involved in trying to realize this dream; the development of a relationship between the University of Plymouth and the S 130 team; the advantages to both parties, and the public, which have emerged because of a close working relationship around the rebuild. Most significantly, it has opened a door into the operational history of this weapons system that a traditional study of history may have overlooked.
This paper was delivered to the 46th Exeter Maritime History Conference at the Centre for Maritime Historical Studies, University of Exeter in September 2012.

G.H. Bennett, ‘The Restoration of S 130: The Last German Motor Torpedo Boat of the Second World War’, The Second World War Military Operations Research Papers, No. 1 (2012)

Ross

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fredleander
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Re: The Restoration of S 130: The Last German Motor Torpedo

Post by fredleander » 24 Feb 2013 16:56

I have followed the restoration for some years now, it has had its ups and downs but I hope they shall be able to complete it. It is interesting to read in the study some of the British public's negative reactions on the restoration. Does some of it stem from the fact that the S-boat was a much better weapon system than the British ones built to cover the same mission area - the MTB's? The British are a little fuzzy that way...:-)...That is maybe why they insist to call them "E"-boats ("Enemy"), too. A common denominator which could mean anything. The S-boats were faster, more reliable, more seaworthy, had a longer range, were less vulnerable and had a better weapons load in any given period.

John F. Kennedy, a not unknown US naval officer and MTB (PT) Commander, wrote this about the S-boats after his visit as a reporter for Hearst to Germany in 1945:

“Spent the day in Bremen talking to Navy officials and to heads of military government in this area. Among other things, the Navy had accurate reports on German E-boats which correspond to our PT boats. The German boat is approximately 105 feet - engines developed 6,000 horse power – had four torpedo tubes [Author note: This would be the late war S-700 Class which is the only model to have forward and rearward torpedo tubes] and a gun equivalent to our 40mm – a couple of 20mms and some light machine guns. In speed they range from 42 knots to 49 knots in actual trials. (Kennedy might also have miswritten 4 torpedoes for 4 tubes – auth. rmk).

Their cruising range was about 700 miles at 35 knots – their displacement about 115 tons – their engines were Diesels. These figures demonstrate that the German E boat was far superior to our PT boat. It was 25 feet longer, just as fast, nearly twice as heavy, and had a greater cruising range at high speed – in armament it was about equal. Their boat is a better heavy-weather boat, cheaper to operate because it burns oil instead of gasoline and, for the same reason, safer from fire or explosion.”


I had hoped to see S 130 in its proper element together with my former Swedish minesweeper during my planned visit to England in September 2015. A PR tour for a planned expanded redux of my book on Operation Sealion. With even more stuff on the S-boats, too.... :wink:

Fred

Fred
River Wide, Ocean Deep - a book about Operation Sealion:
https://www.fredleander.com
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Nautilus
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Re: The Restoration of S 130: The Last German Motor Torpedo Boat

Post by Nautilus » 05 Sep 2019 17:42

S-Boats were superior to the PT Boats because they were not PT Boats :D

Translation: the S-100 and further S-Boats had not been designed along the lines of a PT Boat or a MAS Boat from the start. They had been designed with "a very small destroyer" idea in mind.

Which meant a hull twice as big as a PT, heavy armament to withstand 2 or more opponents at once, hydrodynamic shape meant for sustained high speed in the roughest seas, Diesel operation which allows long patrols and is less prone to catch fire. Adding insult to injury, the draft of the S-Boats was only 1.5ft more than a PT, which allowed operations in the confined shsllow waters of the Baltic.

Nautilus
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Re: The Restoration of S 130: The Last German Motor Torpedo Boat

Post by Nautilus » 05 Sep 2019 17:43

Double post.
Last edited by Nautilus on 06 Sep 2019 11:26, edited 1 time in total.

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fredleander
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Re: The Restoration of S 130: The Last German Motor Torpedo Boat

Post by fredleander » 05 Sep 2019 21:05

Nautilus wrote:
05 Sep 2019 17:42
S-Boats were superior to the PT Boats because they were not PT Boats :D

Translation: the S-100 and further S-Boats had not been designed along the lines of a PT Boat or a MAS Boat from the start. They had been designed with "a very small destroyer" idea in mind.

Which meant a hull twice as big as a PT, heavy armament to withstand 2 or more opponents at once, hydrodynamic shape meant for sustained high speed in the roughest seas, Diesel operation which allows long patrols and is less prone to catch fire. Adding insult to injury, the draft of the S-Boats was only 1.5ft more than a PT, which allowed operations in the confined shsllow waters of the Baltic.
Or the Channel... :wink: ..

Fred
River Wide, Ocean Deep - a book about Operation Sealion:
https://www.fredleander.com
Saving MacArthur - an eight-book series on the Pacific War:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07D3 ... rw_dp_labf

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