Articles published by members

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G. Trifkovic
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Articles published by members

Post by G. Trifkovic » 18 Sep 2016 12:27

In this thread our members will have the opportunity to present the articles they have authored (or co-authored), and which were accepted for publication in either academic journals or in edited volumes. In this way, our community will be kept abreast with the latest historiographical developments in the field of history of Axis powers and the Second World War, and will also raise the visibility of authors’ research. In addition to the basic bibliographic information (name of the author, full title, name of the journal/edited volume, volume number/year, page range), please add DOI (Digital Object Identifier), if available, and an abstract (if you wish to discuss an article, please do so in a separate thread).

I’ll start:

Gaj Trifković,

NEW - UPDATE JANUARY 2018

o „The Partisans’ Lost Victories: Operations in Montenegro and Bosnia-Herzegovina 1944-1945“ in: Journal of Military History Vol. 82/No. 1 (2018), pp. 95-124.
The essay at hand covers the operations on the southern flank of the German front in Yugoslavia from October 1944 to April 1945. During this period, the Germans managed to extricate their 21st Mountain Corps from virtual encirclement on two occasions (in Montenegro and the Bosna River Valley) and ultimately reinforce their hard-pressed main line in the Balkans with this battered, but still battle-worthy formation. This article will provide the reader with a brief description of this little-known campaign and explain the reasons behind what was probably the Yugoslav Partisans’ greatest “lost victory” of the war. The main argument is that such an outcome was largely the result of the Yugoslav leadership’s refusal to award sufficient attention to this sector of the front and the internal political considerations, but also of the German army’s skillfully conducted defense. The article will also dwell on the battlefield effectiveness of both sides, and the Partisans’ efforts to become a regular army in both their outlook and operational manner.

o „The German ‚Ultra‘: Signals Intelligence in Yugoslavia 1943-1944“ in: Journal of Intelligence History, January 2018, pp. 1-17.
https://doi.org/10.1080/16161262.2018.1425033
This article deals with the extensive signals surveillance program operated by the Wehrmacht and directed at their most dangerous enemy in the Balkans, the Yugoslav Partisans. This subject has so far received surprisingly little attention in academic circles despite the fact that it was one of the crucial pillars of the entire Axis counter-insurgency effort in Yugoslavia, and that it was one of the most successful actions of its kind conducted by the German intelligence. Based largely on previously unpublished primary sources, as well as post-war literature, this article will outline the workings of the program during its heyday in the years 1943–1944, and seek to establish its impact on the battlefield. As such, it will hopefully prove to be useful to both students of wartime events in the Western Balkans, and to researchers of intelligence services during the Second World War in general
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o „In a Search for a Good German“ in: Journal of Intelligence, Propaganda and Security Studies, Vol.5/No.1 (2011), pp. 77-86.
This article will examine the portrayal of the “other side” in socialist Yugoslavia’s war movies from 1945 to 1990. We shall see how these movies reflected social changes in the country, evolving from simple propaganda glorifying the heroic struggle against the German invader to more sophisticated artistic products with a nuanced picture of both the good and the bad guys. The portrayal of the Germans was also influenced by the changes in foreign policy of the socialist state. Until the Sixties, the depiction of the Germans was mostly based on war-time memoirs, and was correspondingly negative. As Yugoslavia's relations with the Federal Republic of Germany improved, and as the country began opening up to the world, a new and positive picture of Germany and its people emerged. Internal difficulties of the Eighties left their mark on war movies. The “Bad German” seemed a distant memory in the face of evil coming from within.

o „A Case of Failed Counterinsurgency” in: The Journal for Slavic Military Studies, Vol.24/No.2 (2011), pp. 314-336.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13518046.2011.572733
This article examines operations “Weiss” and “Schwarz,” two of the largest anti-guerrilla sweeps conducted by the German Wehrmacht during the entire Second World War. Four reinforced divisions with ca. 65,000 German soldiers and up to 100 aircraft took part in what is regarded as the most ferocious fighting of the whole war in Yugoslavia. Although conducted with maximum effort in material terms, they were doomed to failure because of the Third Reich's neglect of guerrilla warfare and the resulting lack of a sound counter-insurgency doctrine. Remarkably, operations “Weiss” and “Schwarz” are almost unknown to the public in the West, despite their sheer size. As the founding myths of socialist Yugoslavia, they were extensively written about, almost always from a Partisan perspective. This is the first article to describe the events from the German point of view, and to analyze the Wehrmacht's conduct of these operations in some depth. With the ongoing COIN campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, examining the lessons from the past can prove enlightening.
(see also related discussion with Klaus Schmider [UK Military Academy Sandhurst] in: The Journal for Slavic Military Studies, Vol.24/Nr.4 (2011), pp. 718-725; http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13518046.2011.624878, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13518046.2011.624879)


o „Making Deals with the Enemy: Partisan‐ German Contacts and Prisoner Exchanges in Yugoslavia 1941‐1945” in: Global War Studies, Vol. 10/No. 2 (2013), pp. 6-37.
http://dx.doi.org/10.5893/19498489.10.02.01
The prospect of prisoner exchange was often the only reason for sparing captives in irregular warfare fought on the edges of international law. During World War II, such prisoner exchanges were few, due to the totality of the war and the irreconcilable attitudes of the warring parties. Yugoslavia was an exception, as it witnessed massive and frequent exchanges of able-bodied prisoners between the communist-led Partisans and the Germans. What started as isolated cases, motivated by a spontaneous desire to save captured compatriots, soon evolved into a complex affair involving propaganda and intelligence issues, as well as political talks between two ideological arch-enemies. This article is the first attempt to provide a comprehensive, non-ideological survey of the topic, which is neglected in former Yugoslav historiography and is virtually unknown to the public in the West.

o „The Key to the Balkans: The Battle for Serbia 1944” in: The Journal of Slavic Military Studies, Vol.28/No. 3 (2015), pp. 524-555.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13518046.2015.1061825
The aim of this article is to analyze the operations in Western Serbia and the neighboring regions conducted from March through September 1944 by the Yugoslav Partisans on one side and the Germans and collaborationist troops on the other. Knowledge of these operations is important for understanding subsequent military and political developments, namely the joint Soviet-Partisan offensive on Belgrade and the establishment of the Communist-dominated government in Yugoslavia. Little is known about these events in the West, in particular the details of the military co-operation between the Germans and the Serbian Chetniks, which developed to its full extent during this period. By relying on a wide array of primary sources, the article will hopefully shed some light on these complex issues, as well as help settle the still-existing controversies surrounding the Serbian nationalist guerrillas’ role in the last year of the war.
o "Carnage in the Land of Three Rivers: The Syrmian Front 1944-1945" in: Militärgeschichtliche Zeitschrift, Bd. 75/Nr. 1 (2016), pp. 94-122.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/mgzs-2016-0004
The aim of this article will be to examine the operations of the Yugoslav Partisans and German armed forces in northern parts of Yugoslavia in late 1944 and early 1945. Since the summer of 1941, the communist-led guerrilla movement had conducted a massive guerrilla campaign against Axis forces, at the same time striving to build a regular army and thus gain recognition as a full-time member of the anti-Hitler coalition. The arrival of the Red Army and liberation of country’s eastern parts in September and October 1944 secured material foundations for a creation of a regular field force. Whether this nascent army would be capable of defeating its retreating, but still dangerous German foe remained to be seen.
o “’Damned Good Amateurs’: Yugoslav Partisans in the Belgrade Operation 1944” in: The Journal of Slavic Military Studies, Vol. 29/No. 2 (2016), pp. 253-278.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13518046.2016.1168131
On 16 October 2014, Russian President Vladimir Putin attended a parade in Belgrade marking the 70th anniversary of its liberation by the Red Army and the Communist-led Yugoslav Partisans. In addition to being a public display of the historic bonds and mutual friendship between the two states, the event also symbolically reaffirmed the role of the Yugoslav Partisans in these operations by parading their old battle flags. In light of strong revisionist tendencies in the past 25 years that sought to diminish or even deny the Partisans’ contribution to the liberation of the country, this represents a small but important gesture. The aim of this article will be to provide an overview of operations in Serbia from late September to late October 1944, to quantify the Partisans’ contribution to the campaign, and to briefly discuss Soviet-Yugoslav cooperation during this period.

o "The Forgotten Surrender: the End of the Second World War in Yugoslavia" in: International Journal of Military History and Historiography, Vol.37/No.2 (2017), pp. 147-172.
http://dx.doi.org/24683302-03702002
English-language historiography has paid scant attention to the events in Yugoslavia in spring 1945, despite the fact that the combined strength of the armies pitted against each other amounted to around 800,000 men, and that it was the only front in Europe which was held independently by a junior member of the anti-Hitler coalition. This article provides an analysis of both the capitulation of the German Army Group E, and the widely diverging descriptions of the same event offered by German and Yugoslav authors. The main argument presented here is that the Yugoslav leadership, prompted by both internal and foreign policy considerations, did not shirk from using less-than-honourable methods to achieve its aims. In doing this, the article will also provide insights into the functioning of the historiography of the socialist era when dealing with potentially embarrassing issues.

o "’The German Anabasis’: The Breakthrough of Army Group E from Eastern Yugoslavia 1944", in: The Journal of Slavic Military Studies, Vol.30/No.4 (2017), pp. 602-629.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13518046.2017.1377014
The eastern parts of Yugoslavia were the site of savage fighting between October and December 1944, as the German Army Group E tried to force its way out of an almost desperate situation it had found itself in following the evacuation of Greece. Against all odds, this huge German formation managed to best three Allied armies, rugged terrain, and autumn rains and reach the relative safety of the Independent State of Croatia, where it joined the remainder of the Axis front in the Balkans. Although this dramatic episode had been extensively written about in the former Yugoslavia and Germany, it received next to no attention in the English-speaking academic community. The article at hand will provide an overview and an analysis of military operations based on a wide plethora of primary and secondary sources of all sides. It will also argue that the ultimate success of the breakthrough was as much due to the unwillingness of the Soviet high command to devote more resources to the Balkan Front, and the structural weaknesses of the Bulgarian and Yugoslav Partisans’ armies, as it was to the battlefield prowess of the Wehrmacht.

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G. Trifkovic
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Re: Articles published by members

Post by G. Trifkovic » 03 Oct 2016 23:38

Announcement:

o "The Long Way to Trieste: Operations in the Yugoslav Littoral 1944-1945" (appears in Global War Studies in 2017)
From September 1944 to May 1945, the Yugoslav Partisans carried out a series of successful large-scale operations along the Adriatic coast aimed at liberating the country’s coastal belt and claiming the territories awarded to Italy by the 1920 Treaty of Rapallo. From the military point of view, these operations represented the culmination of Partisan efforts to evolve into a regular army capable of facing the Germans in open battle. Politically, the campaign was marked by increasing tensions between the Partisans and the Western Allies, especially over the fate of the city of Trieste. While well known in the former Yugoslavia, the littoral campaign is almost unknown in the West. This article will seek to address this imbalance by providing an overview of these military operations and analyzing both the Partisans’ performance in battle and their attitude towards the Western Allies during this period.

James A Pratt III
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Re: Articles published by members

Post by James A Pratt III » 28 Dec 2016 21:20

These are articles I have wrote that were published in Over the Front magazine which deal with WWI aviation:

OTF 20-1 The Mexican Punitive Expedition deals with the first aero squadron with the Pershing Punitive expedition

OTF 23-1 B-Boats vs L-planes deals with the RN B-class submarines in the Adriatic and their actions with the KUK ships and aircraft

OTF 30-1 Attack on the Slava deals with the German air attacks on the Russian Battleship Slava lets just say the ship was a real bomb magnet.

Georges JEROME
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Re: Articles published by members

Post by Georges JEROME » 01 Jan 2017 16:52

Hello,

My first article was published in the Revue des Guerres Presses Universitaires de France

- les milices de la communauté allemande de Pologne 1939 1940 (Revue des Guerres Mondiales P.U.F. juillet 1991) the organisation and action of the militias of the folk german community living in South Poland

Then I choose to write articles on miscellaneous subjects not covered as such. All in the illustrated monthly "39 45 Magazine" published by the famous french editor Heimdal. Fully illustrated of documents and pics. Based on primary and referenced sources in a format of 10 - 16 pages.

- Ordnungspolizei en Moselle 1940 (39/45 Magazine décembre 1999) action of the Polizei Bataillons in the newly annexed area of Moselle in 1940
- Le Gouvernement Général de Pologne (39/45 Magazine octobre 2001) study upon the german political network and the central organisation
- Curt Daluege Chef de l’Ordnungspolizei 1933 – 1943 ( 39/45 Magazine 2005) biography of the first chief of the Ordnungspolizei 1936-1943
- Alfred Wunnenberg Chef de l’Ordnungspolizei 1943 – 1945 (39/45 Magazine 2007) bio of the second chief of the Ordnungspolizei 1943 - 1945
- Le Technische Nothilfe dans la Campagne de France 1940 (39/45 Magazine 2011) action of the various bataillons of the Teno during the Campaign of France
- L’invasion de la Tchécoslovaquie en mars 1939 (39/45 Magazine (2013) Operation South East the entry of the german in the remnants of Czechoslovakia. Detailled movement of troops of the lone day of 15 may 19
- Jüttner Chef du SS-Führungshauptamt 1940 – 1945 (39/45 Magazine 2014) bio of the chief of SS-Führungshauptamt
- Le commandement territorial de la Waffen-SS en Hollande (39/45 Magazine 2015) a study of the Befehlshaber der Waffen-SS, training units and Landstorm Nederland Regiment
and this month
- Berger Chef du SS-Hauptamt 1940 – 1945 (39/45 Magazine 2017) bio of the Chief of the SS-Hauptamt as well the organisation of the recruiting of Waffen-SS in the whole europe
next one
- Unternehmen Otto (Anschluss marz 1938). The detailled military operations of the 8.Armee in Austria

Georges

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K.Kocjancic
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Re: Articles published by members

Post by K.Kocjancic » 25 Jan 2017 07:06

In the latest "Journal of Slavic Military History" is my article on "Waräger" Regiment: "Between Vlasov and Himmler: Russian SS-Sonder-Regiment 1 ‘Waräger’ in Slovenia, 1944–45"

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10. ... 17.1271659

ABSTRACT
The aim of the article is to present the little-known Russian (Soviet) military unit that fought on the German side during the Second World War. Origins of this regiment go back to the Wrangel’s émigré army in the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, which provided the cadre for the future unit, working for the Germans against their old enemy — communists. First established as auxiliary police in Serbia, personnel were then sent to the Eastern front to perform commando-style actions in the Soviet hinterland. With the collapse of the German might, this unit was sent to Slovenia, reformed as a regiment, and used in warfare against local partisans.

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Der Alte Fritz
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Re: Articles published by members

Post by Der Alte Fritz » 13 May 2017 21:30

The Journal of Slavic Military Studies
Volume 30, 2017 - Issue 2 May 2017
The Influence of Railways on Military Operations in the Russo-German War 1941–1945
H. G. W. Davie

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10. ... 17.1308120

ABSTRACT
In common with much of the historiography of the Russo-German War of 1941–1945, there has been extensive study of the role of railways in the war, with either side concentrating on different aspects of the subject. But to date there has been little attempt to make a comparative study of the railways on both sides and to gauge the effect of differences in capacity on military operations and their outcomes. This lack has allowed one or both sides to obscure key failures and to deflect the influence on military operations away from railways. Yet the ubiquitous nature of railways for travel and transport in Russia, due to the large size of the country and the inability of motor vehicles to support operations beyond 300–400 km, meant that every military operation of the war was dependant on railways, and the way in which they were used was a key element in their success or failure. The current study aims to compare operating practices between Soviet and German military railways, to give estimates of the railway capacity available to both sides, and then to use this information to gauge the effect of this capacity on military operations.

J. Ryan Stackhouse
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Re: Articles published by members

Post by J. Ryan Stackhouse » 09 Sep 2017 18:04

J. Ryan Stackhouse, "Gestapo Interrogation Techniques: Myths and Realities," in Interrogation in War and Conflict: A Comparative and Interdisciplinary Analysis, eds. Christopher Andrew and Simona Tobia, (London: Routledge, 2014).

Addresses the frequency and targets of coercive "enhanced interrogation" techniques by the Nazi Secret State Police. Finds that both brutality as well as coercion were largely directed against non-German populations with rare exceptions for social and political outsiders defined as security threats due to their personal background. Suggests that the role of terror remains vastly overstated in our understanding of support for Hitler's dictatorship.

https://www.routledge.com/Interrogation ... 0415828031

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G. Trifkovic
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Re: Articles published by members

Post by G. Trifkovic » 31 Oct 2017 18:48

Update October 2017 - see the first post.

Cheers,

G.

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G. Trifkovic
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Re: Articles published by members

Post by G. Trifkovic » 02 Feb 2018 22:34

Update January 2018 - see the first post.

Cheers,

G.

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G. Trifkovic
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Re: Articles published by members

Post by G. Trifkovic » 29 Mar 2018 09:39

Update March 2018

"The Forgotten Surrender: the End of the Second World War in Yugoslavia" in: International Journal of Military History and Historiography, Vol.37/No.2 (2017), pp. 147-172.

Early Career Paper Prize 2018 - Free copy available at:

http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com ... 2-03702002

Georges JEROME
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Re: Books published by members

Post by Georges JEROME » 26 Apr 2018 12:00

my last article (in french) is dedicated to the military operations of the Wehrmacht during Anschluss just published in issue mai/juin 2018 of 39/45 Magazine. 16 pages fully illustrated of 37 pictures, 3 maps and 7 documents.
I'm gratefull to fellow members of the A.B.R. section for their kind help and assistance (Zinke, Graveland...) also most usefull posts of Askropp, Histan, Rossano...
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Best regards

Georges

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Adolf Hitler and German Military Intelligence on the Eastern Front (ARTICLE)

Post by anlaoch » 30 Jul 2018 17:25

Hello all,

I recently had an article on Hitler and the FHO published in the Journal of Slavic Military Studies. it deals specifically with military intelligence on the Eastern Front in 1942 (Adolf Hitler and German Military Intelligence on the Eastern Front: Operations Blau and Edelweiß (January–November 1942)). It is available free at https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10 ... 18.1487199

I hope you enjoy it!

Alan.

Mori
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Re: Adolf Hitler and German Military Intelligence on the Eastern Front (ARTICLE)

Post by Mori » 05 Aug 2018 07:56

anlaoch wrote:
30 Jul 2018 17:25
Hello all,

I recently had an article on Hitler and the FHO published in the Journal of Slavic Military Studies. it deals specifically with military intelligence on the Eastern Front in 1942 (Adolf Hitler and German Military Intelligence on the Eastern Front: Operations Blau and Edelweiß (January–November 1942)). It is available free at https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10 ... 18.1487199

I hope you enjoy it!

Alan.
It's an extract from your PhD, isn't? Your PhD is reported in the dedicated threat: viewtopic.php?f=19&t=198029&start=75#p2147384)

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266 Infanterie Division

Post by pionneer22 » 22 Sep 2018 14:47

Hello everybody,

have just finished my book on the history(story) of 266 Division infantry. This book redraws the history(story) of this static division in greatest detail from August, 1943 till August, 1944 of Côtes-du-Nord in Normandy including Finistère. You will find veterans' testimonies, new photos there and German maps colors engraved on CD to follow the movements of the units. You will teach it the number of made breads and the number of shot down animals, the armament and the names of the officers
Sold 29 Euros + postal charges (8.65 for France; 16.80 for Europe)
bon de souscription 1.jpg
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Der Alte Fritz
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Re: Articles published by members

Post by Der Alte Fritz » 24 Oct 2018 15:36

Journal article published 15th October 2018
The Journal of Slavic Military Studies
Volume 31, 2018 - Issue 4 Logistics of the Combined-Arms Army — Motor Transport
by HGW Davie
https://doi.org/10.1080/13518046.2018.1521360

Motor vehicles have always been regarded as an indicator of modernity, technological advancement, and industrial progress, right from the time of the first motor car in 1885. The Soviet Union was no exception, and there is an extensive Soviet historiography of the development of motor transport and its use during the German-Soviet War. The aim of this article is to put the wartime military and economic use of Soviet vehicles into a wider context, highlighting how mechanization was not the only important variable in successful logistics. The case study here will be the role of transportation in the logistics of a Soviet combined arms army (общевойсковая армия) utilizing detailed primary source material from the pamyat-naroda.ru website.

PM me if you do not have academic access to T&F journals

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