Panzer Voran material request in exchange for copy of my research guide

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Simon Trew 1
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Posts: 11
Joined: 29 May 2017 07:46
Location: UK

Panzer Voran material request in exchange for copy of my research guide

Post by Simon Trew 1 » 30 May 2019 16:48

Hello, please forgive my clunky attempt at a post but although I look at this forum fairly often and find the contents fascinating, I am not the most adept user of such things and fear that I've put this in the wrong place or breached various protocols. If so, I can only apologise.

Anyway, here goes.

I'm approaching the end of the first phase of a big project, which involves producing a series of research guides to the 1944 Normandy campaign. The first volume, to be self-published later this year (I've had enough of mainstream publishers and in any case this project is fairly niche) is an annotated bibliography of sources on the German perspective on the campaign. At the moment, the draft runs at about 220 pages of single-line-spaced A4, with well over a thousand separate entries (books, articles, dissertations, unpublished and published primary sources) in English, French and German languages. The word count is about 110,000 words and rising each day.

I still have a bunch of things to add and describe. But I can see the light at the end of the tunnel and I think the list will be ready to go within a month or two. Of course, new things are appearing all the time, and it is in the nature of most bibliographies to be out of date the moment they appear. But if this was a sufficient deterrent to action, none would ever appear at all. To me at least, it appears that there is so much stuff out there about the Germans in Normandy that it is high time it was listed and organised properly. One can always revise and publish a new edition five or ten years from now.

The current version of the bibliography is organised alphabetically. Once I've finished adding the remaining entries, I will re-organise the material under thematic headings. That won't be too intellectually challenging, although it will take a bit of time and some things will end up appearing under more than one sub-heading. But in short, I know how I want to do that and I just need the hours to throw at the task.

Anyway, my problem is this. I can't source copies of the material about German forces that fought in Normandy from almost all the copies of Alain Verwicht's 'Panzer Voran' (PV). There is one exception - the material on 716 ID that appears in Edition number 51. I managed to buy that one. But 24 out of the first thirty PVs contained at least one piece on German unit/s that fought in Normandy, and I just can't track these down. For a long time this didn't matter too much, as there were hundreds of hundreds of things I did have that I could get on with summarising. But now I'm trying to fill the remaining few gaps, and this is probably the most prominent among them.

I have a complete list of the articles I'd like to see. Does any user of this forum have a set of PV, and if so might they be willing to copy the relevant pieces and send them to me?

In exchange, I will be happy to provide that person with a free copy of the bibliography when it appears later this year. I hope this is not an unattractive offer. The price point for the bibliography is not yet determined, but it will not be cheap. That reflects the fact that I've thrown a huge number of hours at the project and have bought/procured almost everything listed in it (admittedly over a 25 year period but with particularly heavy expenditure recently). I do need to make at least some of these costs back, and in any case I'm pretty sure it will be a genuinely useful thing - at least, for members of forums like this and others who share similar interests. My market may be niche, but it is passionate and well informed.

I'm adding below the material listed under 'S' in the current, alphabetic version of the bibliography, basically as evidence that I'm not making this up! As mentioned above, the final version of the source guide will spread the contents under thematic headings, but at least this shows the sort of thing I'm doing. Also, you'll notice some incomplete items. These are either things I don't yet have (but I have a plan to get them) or things I do have, but which I haven't yet had time to describe (some of these are sitting on my desk as I type). Also, there are a few things I haven't even added. So if you see the list and think there's some obvious source I've missed, (a) you might be right, or (b) I might already know about it but I just haven't got around to adding it!

Well, thanks for reading this. I hope regardless of whether you can help with my specific request, I've whetted your appetite and that when it finally emerges, you'll think about buying the bibliography and the other publications that will follow it.

If you can help (and want to do so), please tell me here and I can find some way of letting you know how. I work in the Department of War Studies at The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst (i.e. the UK's initial officer training establishment) and I guess it's vaguely possible one or two people might recognised the name already. No offence taken if not - I'm a pretty tiny fish in a massive pond.

Bye for now,

Simon (Trew)

Here's the 'S' entries:

PS That didn't work first time around - I see I'm only allowed 70,000 characters and if I include all the 'S' entries it's 105,000+. This explains why it stops well before the end of the stuff I've done under 'S'!!

S

Sakkers, Hans (Ed.): Normandie 6. Juni 1944 im Spiegel der deutschen Kriegstagebücher: der Großangriff auf den Atlantikwall (Biblio Verlag, Osnabrück 1998; 413pp., maps, illustrations). This German-language book brings together many of the surviving German documents relating to the D-Day landings. It provides biographical information about senior German commanders (pp.397-411), as well as lists of command and staff appointments (pp.91-102). It also includes detailed information about coastal defences and Allied air attacks against these positions before D-Day (pp.104-75), daily weather reports for the period 10 April – 6 June 1944 (pp.178-81), and numerous German official reports relating to the activities of their air, sea and ground forces before and on D-Day (pp.7-90). The main section of the book (pp.182-359) provides a minute-by-minute account of events on 6 June, seen from the German perspective and based on original war diaries and other sources. Conspicuous by their absence are tactical-level accounts from ground forces (mostly because such documents did not survive the war), although the book does include interesting post-invasion analyses by staff officers from 352nd and 716th Infantry divisions (pp.66-81). There is also a short but interesting account (pp.82-3) of 642nd Ost Battalion’s experiences on D-Day against British and Canadian airborne forces east of the River Orne.

Salewski, Michael: Die deutsche Seekriegsleitung 1935-1945, Band II: 1942-1945 (Bernhard & Graefe Verlag, Munich 1975; 701pp., maps, illustrations).

Salomon, Gerhard: Die 3.Fallschirmjägerdivision in der Normandie: Ein Beitrag zu ihrer Geschichte (self-published, 1995; 111pp., maps). This German-language book describes the role and experiences of the German 3rd Parachute Division during the Normandy campaign. The structure is chronological, with most of the content appearing as numbered paragraphs under daily headings. The battle for St-Lô is covered on pp.22-51, with the subsequent fighting withdrawal, breakout from the ‘Falaise Pocket’, and final destruction of the division near Mons being described on pp.52-96. On pp.97-101 there is a list of abbreviations. The final section of the book consists of a series of maps that illustrate the division’s movements during summer 1944.

Santin, Eric: “Été 1944: les Tiger de Châteaudun”, in 39/45 Magazine, Number 157-8, July-August 1999, pp.2-15: This article describes the fate of five ‘King Tiger’ tanks belonging to Funklenk-Kompanie 316 (attached to the Panzer Lehr Division), which were encountered by US forces in and around the town of Châteaudun on 16 August 1944, during the breakout from Normandy. French text.

Saunders, Anthony: Hitler’s Atlantic Wall (Sutton Publishing, Stroud 2001; viii + 216pp., maps, illustrations). This is a general history of the origins, construction and employment of the defences built by the Germans along the coastline of north-west Europe during the Second World War. The book covers the area between Dunkirk in the north and the Franco-Spanish border in the south. References to defences in Lower Normandy are sprinkled throughout the text, with specific coverage of fighting in this area on pp.143-64.

Schack, Friedrich-August (trans. Otto, M.): ‘272 Inf Div, Normandy from 5-26 Jul 1944’ (22pp.). This is manuscript B-540 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written mostly from memory by the officer who commanded the German 272nd Infantry Division during the Normandy campaign. The report describes problems associated with the formation and training of the division from late 1943 onwards (pp.1-4), its transfer from southern France to the invasion front in July 1944 (pp.4-9) and its experiences in combat against British and Canadian forces during Operation ‘Goodwood/Atlantic’ and subsequent fighting south of Caen (pp.9-13). The final part of the manuscript includes an evaluation of the division’s performance and that of its enemies, plus an appendix listing command and staff appointments in 272nd Infantry Division during the campaign. There is a short commentary on the contents of Schack’s report, written by Genlt Max Pemsel (Seventh Army’s Chief of Staff), on pp.21-2.

Schack, Friedrich-August. ‘272d Infantry Division, 26 Jul – 12 Sep 1944’ (44pp.). This is manuscript B-702 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written by the officer who commanded the German 272nd Infantry Division during the Normandy campaign. The report describes the transfer of the division to the eastern flank of the Normandy bridgehead at the end of July (pp.1-5), defensive fighting in the Troarn sector in early August (pp.6-8), and the division’s attempt to resist Operations ‘Totalize’ and ‘Tractable’ from 8 August onwards (pp.9-16). Schack also describes the division’s subsequent defensive actions east of the River Dives and around Lisieux (pp.17-25) and the withdrawal of surviving elements to and across the River Seine at the end of August (pp.26-30). The final section of the report consists of an evaluation of the division’s performance and that of its enemies, and an appendix that lists command and staff appointments in the division during the campaign.

Schafer, Robin and Doyle, Peter: Desert Knight: The Memoirs of Leutnant Günter Halm, Knight’s Cross Holder, Panzergrenadier: From El Alamein to Normandy (Frontline Books 2019, 224pp., maps, illustrations). As its title suggests, this book describes the wartime experiences of a highly decorated German officer who served with 21st Panzer Division in Normandy. The subject was captured in the ‘Falaise Pocket’ at the end of the campaign.

Schaufelberger, W.: “Overlord: Die Landung der Westalliierten”, in Allgem. Schweizer Militarzeitschrift, Number 150, 1984, pp.00-00.

Scheidt, Wilhelm: ‘Preliminary Interrogation Report: Scheidt, Dr Wilhelm Heinrich’ (3pp.). The first two pages of this document were produced by the U.S. Seventh Army Interrogation Center (Ref. No. SAIC/PIR/210, dated 24 July 1945). The third page (‘Preliminary Interrogation Report No.18’, 18 September 1945) provides additional information about Dr Scheidt’s work. The report notes that its subject served during the Second World War as chief assistant to Generalleutnant Scherff, head of the Historical Section of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (Armed Forces High Command). In this role, Scheidt attended many of Hitler’s military conferences and received official documents from numerous sources. The interrogation report casts light on why Scheidt’s own account of the Normandy campaign (QV) should be regarded as an important historical document. The interrogation report can be found in the U.S. National Archives, Record Group 407, Box 1509, Folder 101-2.13.

Scheidt, Wilhelm: ‘The War in the West’. This is OI Special Interrogation Report 39 (ref. OI-SIR/39), dated 30 April 1947. It was produced under the supervision of U.S. Seventh Army’s Interrogation Center and can be found in the U.S. National Archives, Record Group 407, Box 1508, Folder 101-2.13. The manuscript was written by Captain Dr Wilhelm Scheidt, who served from June 1938 as a historian in the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (the German Armed Forces High Command). It was based partly on Scheidt’s own recollections as a senior historian with privileged access to official sources, and partly on notes made during 1944-5 by another German military historian, Major Percy Schramm (QV), which were temporarily made available to Scheidt after his capture (see Schramm, Percy: “An Interview with Major Percy Schramm: Preparation of History of Wehrmachtführungsstab”, ETHINT 14). The first five pages of the report describe German defence problems before 6 June 1944. D-Day and the Normandy campaign are covered on pp.7-28, with emphasis on events during August. The role of the Kriegsmarine and Luftwaffe, plus the V-1 offensive, are dealt with on pp.28-33. Pages 33-41 take the story to the end of August, including the final stages of the ‘Falaise Pocket’ fighting, the withdrawal to the River Seine, and the loss of Paris.

Scherer, Wingolf and Broch, Ernst-Detlef: Untergang: Kampf und Vernichtung der 277. Division in der Normandie und in der Eifel (Helios Verlags- und Buchvertriebsgesellschaft, Aachen 2005; 246pp., maps, illustrations). This is a German-language history of the German-Austrian 277th Infantry Division, which fought throughout much of the Normandy campaign. The book covers the entire war, from the division’s formation in southern France in early 1944 to its destruction east of the Rhine in May 1945. The division’s experiences in Normandy are described on pp.16-97 and in an appendix on pp.197-210.

Scherer, Wingolf (Ed.): Wiederkehr: Fotos und Aufzeichnungen von Infanteristen der 277.ID / VGD aus den Kämpfen in Frankreich (Normandie) und in der Eifel 1944/1945 (Helios Verlags- und Buchvertriebsgesellschaft, Aachen 2008; 124pp., maps, illustrations). This German-language book contains substantial extracts from the wartime diaries of two former members of the German-Austrian 277th Infantry Division, supplemented by editorial contributions that provide information about the division’s organisation and history. Pages 4-73 cover the Normandy campaign. Pages 74-118 take the story to the end of the war.

Schimpf, Richard: ‘Answers to Major Hechler’s Questionnaire’ (4pp.). This is manuscript A-906 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written in 1945 by the officer who commanded the German 3rd Parachute Division throughout the Normandy campaign. The content consists of written responses to questions put to Schimpf by two U.S. Army historians (Hechler and Ferriss) regarding 3rd Parachute Division’s tactics, losses and use of reserves during the campaign.

Schimpf, Richard (trans. May): ‘Normandy Campaign (6 Jun – 24 July 44)’ (8pp.). This is manuscript B-020a in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written in 1946 by the officer who commanded the German 3rd Parachute Division throughout the Normandy campaign. The content summarises 3rd Parachute Division’s role and experiences. It also provides some analysis of U.S. fighting techniques during the campaign.

Schimpf, Richard (trans. l’Orsa, Cilgia): ‘Operations of the 3 FS Div during the Invasion in France, June – Aug 1944’ (29pp.). This is manuscript B-541 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written from memory in 1947 by the officer who commanded the German 3rd Parachute Division throughout the Normandy campaign. The content describes the formation of 3rd Parachute Division, its activities in Brittany during early 1944 (pp.3-4) and its condition on the eve of the Allied invasion (pp.5-6). Pages 7-13 cover the deployment of the division to Normandy during June. Pages 13-16 deal with the defensive fighting in which it was involved for the next few weeks. The division’s role in the battle for St-Lô (11-18 July) is described on pp.16-18. Schimpf analyses 3rd Parachute Division’s weaknesses (e.g. lack of reinforcements, weak artillery) and the influence of the natural environment on fighting at the tactical level on pp.18-23. Finally, the author assesses U.S. combat performance in the battles of June – July (pp.24-5). At the end of the manuscript there is a two-page commentary by Genlt Max Pemsel, who served as Chief of Staff for the German Seventh Army during much of the 1944 campaign. Parts of the document are reproduced in David Isby’s ‘The German Army at D-Day: Fighting the Invasion’ (pp.161-3, QV). Additional extracts are included in Isby’s ‘Fighting in Normandy: The German Army from D-Day to Villers-Bocage’ (pp.89, 130-1, 233, QV).

Schlieben, Karl Wilhelm von (trans. Weber, G.): ‘The German 709th Infantry Division during the fighting in Normandy’ (174pp.). This is manuscript B-845 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It is one of the lengthiest of the reports written by German generals in post-war captivity that deal with the Normandy campaign. The author commanded the German 709th Infantry Division in Normandy. His account is preceded by an organisational chart that shows the 709th Infantry Division’s order of battle of at the start of the invasion. This is followed by a description of the division’s mission, deployment, and its strengths and weaknesses before D-Day. This section (pp.1-24) also describes the impact of Field Marshal Rommel’s decisions on the defence of the Cotentin peninsula, and the redeployment of some German units shortly before 6 June. Thereafter, the text takes the form of a narrative and analysis of events from D-Day to the author’s capture on 26 June (pp.25-119), within which many extracts from Army Group B’s situation reports, and from Seventh Army’s war diary and telephone log, are quoted. The author concludes by assessing the performance of his own and U.S. troops during the campaign. There are many appendices. One of these (p.125) describes weather conditions on 5-6 June, while others provide additional details about German forces in the Cotentin peninsula (pp.126-30). Appendix H (pp.158-67) includes additional information provided in response to a questionnaire submitted to Genlt von Schlieben by the U.S. Army’s Historical Division. This section focuses on the reasons for the failure of German counter-attacks during the first few days of the campaign. Finally, Appendix I (pp.168-74) contains a report (written in 1944) by Leutnant Werner Roesgen (QV), which describes the role of 709th Infantry Division’s anti-tank battalion from 5-23 June. See also entries under ‘Schoch, Herbert’ and ‘Staalhofer’ (no first initial). Parts of the document are reproduced in David Isby’s ‘The German Army at D-Day: Fighting the Invasion’ (pp.98-108, 189-91, QV). Additional extracts are included in Isby’s ‘Fighting in Normandy: The German Army from D-Day to Villers-Bocage’ (pp.18-20, 23, 55, 78-81, 104, 124, 144, 160, QV).

Schlieben, Karl Wilhelm von: ‘709th Infantry Division (6-12 June 1944)’ (00pp.). This is manuscript D-331 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written in 1954 by the officer who commanded the German 709th Infantry Division in Normandy. Unlike many other reports in the same series, this one was not translated into English.

Schmeelke, Karl-Heinz and Schmeelke, Michael: German Defensive Batteries and Gun Emplacements on the Normandy Beaches: Invasion, D-Day June 6, 1944 (Schiffer Military/Aviation History, Atglen 1995; 52pp., maps, illustrations). This heavily illustrated study provides information about some of the fortifications and strongpoints in the area attacked by the Allies on D-Day.

Schmeelke, Karl-Heinz and Schmeelke, Michael: Guns on the Atlantic Wall 1942-1945 (Schiffer Military/Aviation History, Atglen 1998; 52pp., map, illustrations). Following a brief essay on the construction and features of the Atlantic Wall, most of this book provides technical information about artillery pieces used by the Germans in their coastal defences both in Normandy and elsewhere.

Schmetzer, Rudolf (trans. Edwards, L.): “Report on the Construction of the Atlantic Wall, Part IV: The effect of bombs and heavy naval guns on the fortified defense system of the Atlantic Wall”, in Detwiler, Donald; Burdick, Charles; and Rohwehr, Jürgen (Eds.): World War II German Military Studies – A Collection of 213 special reports on the Second World War prepared by former officers of the Wehrmacht for the United States Army, Volume 12: Part V. The Western Theater (Garland Publishing, Inc., New York & London 1979; 34pp.). This is manuscript B-669 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written by a senior German fortress engineer following a personal inspection (during June – July 1944) of defensive positions along the French coastline. The author states that the quality of their ferro-concrete construction was generally sufficient to allow them to survive even under very heavy air or naval bombardment.

Schmidt, Hans (trans. Rosenwald, A.): ‘275th Infantry Division (Dec 43 – Jun 44)’ (9pp.). This is manuscript A-975 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written in 1946 by the officer who commanded the German 275th Infantry Division during the Normandy campaign. The content describes the division’s formation and its defensive mission in Brittany during early 1944 (pp.1-3). It also covers its piecemeal transfer to the invasion front in June and July (pp.4-5) and its engagement against U.S. forces during Operation ‘Cobra’ (pp.6-8). The manuscript ends with Schmidt’s analysis of the influence of the natural environment on fighting methods in Normandy (pp.8-9).

Schmidt, Hans (trans. Rosenwald, A.): ‘Battles in Northern France, Part III’ (6pp.). This is manuscript A-973 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written by the officer who commanded the German 275th Infantry Division in Normandy. The content briefly describes the division’s experiences during the U.S ‘Cobra’ offensive in late July.

Schmidt, Hans: ‘Defensive fighting at Mortain: 275 Infantry Division’ (16pp., maps). This is manuscript B-370 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written by the officer who commanded the German 275th Infantry Division in Normandy. The content describes the division’s activities from 31 July to 12 August 1944, as well as the withdrawal of surviving elements across the River Seine later the same month. Two appended sketch maps illustrate the division’s deployments from 4-7 August.

Schmidt, Hans (trans. Clausen, Inger): ‘New Formation of the Division at Cambrai and Commitment at Peronne and St. Quentin, 20 Aug until 4 Sep 1944’ (22pp.). This is manuscript B-371 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written by the officer who commanded the German 275th Infantry Division in Normandy. The content describes the reconstitution and activities of the division in the immediate aftermath of the campaign.

Schmidt, Paul Karl: Sie kommen! Der deutsche Bericht über die Invasion und die 80 tägige Schlacht um Frankreich (Verlag Ullstein GmbH, Berlin 1960; 246pp., maps, illustrations). For details of this book’s content see Carell, Paul: ‘Sie kommen! Der deutsche Bericht über die Invasion und die 80 tägige Schlacht um Frankreich’.

Schmidt, Paul Karl: Invasion! They’re Coming! The German Account of the D-Day Landings and the 80 Days’ Battle for France (Schiffer Military History, Atglen 1995; 292pp., maps, illustrations). For a description of this book’s contents see Carell, Paul (trans. Johnston, David): ‘Invasion! They’re Coming! The German Account of the D-Day Landings and the 80 Days’ Battle for France’.

Schmidt, Rudi: Achtung – Torpedos Los! Der Strategische und Operative Einsatz des Kampfgeschwaders 26 - Löwengeschwader (Bernard & Graefe Verlag, Koblenz 1991; 381pp., maps, illustrations). This is a history of a Luftwaffe torpedo-bomber unit that served in various theatres during World War II. Its participation in the Normandy campaign is described on pp.194-205. A detailed list of personnel losses throughout the war appears on pp.338-69.

Schneider, Valentin: “Les divisions allemandes en Basse-Normandie pendant l’Occupation: étude quantitative et qualitative (19 juin 1940 – 5 juin 1944”, in Annales de Normandie, Number 5, 2005, pp.427-58. This French-language article describes the attitudes and behaviours of German occupation forces that were stationed in Normandy before D-Day. It includes an interesting section on Osttruppen plus a list of all German divisions that were deployed in Normandy from summer 1940 to 6 June 1944.

Schneider, Valentin and Talon, Alain: Une garnison en Normandie: La batterie allemande d’Azeville (1942-1944) (Orep Editions, Bayeux 2014; 80pp., maps, illustrations). This is a French-language history of the Azeville Battery, which on D-Day was one of the German artillery positions that defended the east coast of the Cotentin peninsula. The authors describe the genesis and construction of the battery, the experiences of the soldiers who were based there and relationships between the latter and the local French population. The text is heavily illustrated with maps and photographs, many of them published for the first time. The book contains several text boxes that provide English-language summaries of key content

Schneider, Wolfgang (trans. Steinhardt, Frederick): Panzer Tactics: German Small-unit Armor Tactics in World War II (Stackpole Books edition, Mechanicsburg 2005; xv + 352pp., maps, illustrations). Although this book is not especially concerned with events during with the Normandy campaign, it provides a useful source for understanding the theory of German armoured and combined arms warfare at the tactical level in 1944. It is arranged thematically, with chapters on subjects such as offensive & defensive operations, reconnaissance, and logistics & maintenance. The text is heavily illustrated with maps, diagrams and photographs. One or two examples from the Normandy campaign are mentioned.

Schneider, Wolfgang: Tiger im Kampf: Die Einsätz in der Normandie (Armour Research, 2004, 320pp., maps, illustrations). For details of this book’s contents see the English-language version, ‘Tigers in Normandy’.

Schneider, Wolfgang (trans. ‘Battle Born Books and Consulting’): Tigers in Normandy (Stackpole Books, Mechanicsburg 2011; vi + 377pp., maps, illustrations). This is the English-language edition of the author’s original ‘Tiger im Kampf: Die Einsätz in der Normandie’. As the title suggests, the book focuses on the role of German heavy (‘Tiger’) tanks during the Normandy campaign. Fewer than 140 Tiger tanks fought in Normandy, and this book clarifies the fate of almost all of them. Although the emphasis is on describing a series of tactical actions (using numerous quotations from personal accounts), there is plenty of analysis, plus a refreshing tendency to challenge widely held assumptions about some well-known incidents. There are several appendices, providing orders of battle, information about tactical markings applied to German vehicles, details of the numbers of Tiger tanks available to each heavy tank battalion during the campaign, and a list of every Tiger tank loss known to have occurred between 13 June and 30 August 1944. The book is heavily illustrated with photographs (among them, images of battle sites as they appeared at the time of publication) and maps. The book is thoroughly researched, although there are no footnotes, which makes it difficult to know from precisely which sources the author has derived information contained in his text.

Schoch, Herbert: ‘Preliminary Report on the Fighting of the 243d Infantry Division on the Cotentin Peninsula (6 June – 7 August 1944)’ (8pp.). This is Appendix F (pp.137-44) to manuscript B-845 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series (Schlieben, Karl Wilhelm von: ‘The German 709th Infantry Division during the fighting in Normandy’; QV). It was written by an officer from the German 243rd Infantry Division. The content focuses on the condition of the 243rd Infantry Division at the start of the campaign and its initial commitment to battle on the Cotentin peninsula. A small extract from the document is reproduced in David Isby’s ‘Fighting in Normandy: The German Army from D-Day to Villers-Bocage’ (p.23, QV).

Schramm, Percy: “An Interview with Major Percy Schramm: Preparation of History of Wehrmachtführungsstab”, in Detwiler, Donald; Burdick, Charles; and Rohwehr, Jürgen (Eds.): World War II German Military Studies – A Collection of 213 special reports on the Second World War prepared by former officers of the Wehrmacht for the United States Army, Volume 2: Part II. The ETHINT Series (Garland Publishing, Inc., New York & London 1979; ii + 16pp.). This is manuscript ETHINT 14 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It comprises the edited transcript of an August 1945 interview between Major Kenneth Hechler, a U.S. Army historian, and Major Percy Schramm, who served from March 1943 onwards as historian with the Wehrmachtführungsstab (Armed Forces Operation Staff) of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW; High Command of the Armed Forces). The document casts considerable light on the process by which Schramm’s semi-official account of the Normandy campaign came to be written (see Schramm, Percy: ‘Kriegstagebuch des Oberkommandos der Wehrmacht (Wehrmachtführungsstab), Band IV: 1. Januar 1944 – 22. Mai 1945’, pp.255-472). A supplement to ETHINT 14, written by Hechler in September 1945 and included on pp.11-16 of this document, describes work carried out by another OKW historian, Dr Wilhelm Scheidt. It reveals that Scheidt’s own account of the events of 1944 (QV) was based partly on Schramm’s draft manuscripts, which were temporarily in Scheidt’s possession before being returned to Schramm.

Schramm, Percy: ‘Notes on the Execution of War Diaries in the German Armed Forces’ (v + 14pp.). This is manuscript A-860 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written in autumn 1945 by Major Percy Schramm, who served from March 1943 as historian with the Armed Forces Operation Staff of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW; High Command of the Armed Forces). In spring 1945 Schramm produced a semi-official account of the Normandy campaign (see Schramm, Percy: ‘Kriegstagebuch des Oberkommandos der Wehrmacht (Wehrmachtführungsstab), Band IV: 1. Januar 1944 – 22. Mai 1945’, pp.255-364). Manuscript A-860 explains how the raw material on which Schramm’s report was based was produced and processed. The report also explains how German war diaries at all levels from company/battery upwards were supposed to be written and made accessible to official historians and others. Pages i-v of this manuscript provide an alternative (and superior) translation of material that appears later (pp.9-14) in the report.

Schramm, Percy: “OKW War Diary (1 Apr – 18 Dec 1944)”, in Detwiler, Donald; Burdick, Charles; and Rohwehr, Jürgen (Eds.): World War II German Military Studies – A Collection of 213 special reports on the Second World War prepared by former officers of the Wehrmacht for the United States Army, Volume 10: Part IV. The OKW War Diary Series, continued (Garland Publishing, Inc., New York & London 1979; 357pp.). This is manuscript B-034 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It consists of a draft English-language translation of a narrative of events in the West during 1944 written by Major Percy Schramm, who served from March 1943 as historian with the Armed Forces Operation Staff of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW; High Command of the Armed Forces). The original German-language version (which also contains material about the period January – March 1944) was published in 1982 in Schramm, Percy: ‘Kriegstagebuch des Oberkommandos der Wehrmacht (Wehrmachtführungsstab), Band IV’ (QV). Pages 1-98 of the manuscript cover the period 1 April – 18 August 1944. Included in this material is information about German anti-invasion preparations during April, May and early June 1944, and an account of most of the Normandy campaign. Events in northern France during late August, plus details of the Allied invasion of southern France and the fighting in Brittany, are described on pp.99-150. After a lengthy section that covers events later in 1944, pages 309-21 include the English-language translation of a chronology of battles in the West from 6 June – 21 August (pp.456-60 in the published edition). Finally, pages 329-57 reproduce the text of Walter Warlimont’s (QV) situation reports of 12, 18 and 26 August, plus a description of command and defence arrangements in the West dated 25 August (pp.462-72 in the published edition). Parts of the document are reproduced in David Isby’s ‘The German Army at D-Day: Fighting the Invasion’ (pp.169-70, QV). Additional extracts are included in Isby’s ‘Fighting in Normandy: The German Army from D-Day to Villers-Bocage’ (pp.15, 51-2, 75, 101, 123, 141, 159, QV).

Schramm, Percy: ‘Avranches and Falaise: Special Questions’ (1pp.). This is manuscript B-719 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written by an officer who served from March 1943 as historian with the Armed Forces Operation Staff of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW; High Command of the Armed Forces).

Schramm, Percy: Kriegstagebuch des Oberkommandos der Wehrmacht (Wehrmachtführungsstab), Band IV: 1. Januar 1944 – 22. Mai 1945 (Bernard & Graefe Verlag, Munich 1982; 971pp.). This German-language book reproduces various documents written during the war by Major Percy Schramm, a former professor of History at the University of Goettingen who served from March 1943 as historian with the Armed Forces Operation Staff of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW; High Command of the Armed Forces). The development of the situation in western Europe from 1 January to 31 March 1944 is described on pp.255-96. The period from 1 April to 5 June is covered on pp.297-310. The Normandy campaign from D-Day to 18 August is dealt with on pp.311-49 and the situation in northern France during the rest of August on pp.356-64. There are sections on the Allied invasion of southern France (pp.349-56) and the fighting in Brittany (pp.374-6). A chronology of the campaign in the West appears on pp.456-60, followed by the text of 12, 18 and 26 August 1944 situation reports by General Walter Warlimont (Deputy Chief of the OKW Operations Staff) on pp.462-8. A review of command and defence arrangements in the West, dated 25 August 1944, appears on pp.468-72. Despite the book’s title, Schramm’s manuscript is not a proper ‘war diary’, since it does not consist of a series of situation reports written on consecutive days during summer 1944. Rather, as explained in ETHINT 14 (QV above), the text was produced by Schramm after the events described, using notes made at OKW conferences and documents received over a period of months. According to manuscript B-034 (QV, p.5), material relating to the Normandy campaign was completed in March 1945. An English-language translation of most of manuscript B-034 can be found in Schramm, Percy: “OKW War Diary (1 Apr – 18 Dec 44)”, in Detwiler, Donald; Burdick, Charles; and Rohwehr, Jürgen (Eds.): World War II German Military Studies – A Collection of 213 special reports on the Second World War prepared by former officers of the Wehrmacht for the United States Army, Volume 10: Part IV. The OKW War Diary Series, continued (Garland Publishing, Inc., New York & London 1979).

Schuster, Kurt (trans. Schneider, G.): ‘Formation and Commitment of the 85th Infantry Division in the West (February to November 1944)’ (8pp.). This is manuscript B-244 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written from memory in 1946 by the man who served as the German 85th Infantry Division’s Operations Officer during the Normandy campaign. The report describes the formation of the division in northern France in early 1944 and its role as an operational reserve in the lower Somme sector until the end of July.

Schuster, Kurt: ‘Continuation to: Formation and Commitment of the 85 Infantry Division in the West (Feb to Nov 1944): B – The Commitment of the Division’ (8pp.). This is manuscript B-424 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written in early 1947 by the man who served as the German 85th Infantry Division’s Operations Officer during the Normandy campaign. The manuscript describes the division’s transfer to the invasion front from the Pas de Calais in early August 1944.

Schuster, Kurt (trans. Friedrich, no initial given): The ‘85th Infantry Division (Feb – Nov 1944)’ (62pp., maps). This is manuscript B-846 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written mostly from memory by the man who served as the German 85th Infantry Division’s Operations Officer during the Normandy campaign. The first part of the report (pp.1-10) describes the division’s formation in early 1944 and its condition in late July, when it was sent to Normandy. Its transfer to the invasion front is covered on pp.10-17, and its experiences in opposing the Canadian offensive towards Falaise, and during the final battles in the ‘Falaise Pocket’ area, are dealt with on pp.17-27. The remainder of the manuscript covers the division’s withdrawal to and across the River Seine, and operations during September. The report is accompanied by several maps, as well as organisational charts for July and late September 1944.

Schweppenburg, Leo Freiherr Geyr von. All entries for material written by this officer, who commanded Panzer Group West during part of the Normandy campaign, are found under ‘Geyr von Schweppenburg, Leo Freiherr’.

Schwerin, Gerhard Graf von: “An Interview with Genlt Gerhard Graf von Schwerin: 116 Pz Div in Normandy”, in Detwiler, Donald; Burdick, Charles; and Rohwehr, Jürgen (Eds.): World War II German Military Studies – A Collection of 213 special reports on the Second World War prepared by former officers of the Wehrmacht for the United States Army, Volume 2: Part II. The ETHINT Series (Garland Publishing, Inc., New York & London 1979; iii + 22pp.). This is the English-language version of answers to questions submitted in 1945 by U.S. Army historians to the officer who commanded 116th Panzer Division during most of the Normandy campaign. It is manuscript ETHINT 17 within the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. The content of the report covers the organisation and initial engagement of 116th Panzer Division (pp.1-5), its transfer to fight U.S. forces in western Normandy at the end of July (pp.5-14), and its activities (including participation in the Mortain counter-attack) until the end of the campaign (pp.14-22). The original questions put to the author are omitted from the text.

Schwerin, Gerhard Graf von: “An Interview with Genlt Gerhard Graf von Schwerin: 116 Pz Div from the Seine to Aachen”, in Detwiler, Donald; Burdick, Charles; and Rohwehr, Jürgen (Eds.): World War II German Military Studies – A Collection of 213 special reports on the Second World War prepared by former officers of the Wehrmacht for the United States Army, Volume 2: Part II. The ETHINT Series (Garland Publishing, Inc., New York & London 1979; iii + 59pp., maps). This is the English-language version of a report written by the officer who commanded 116th Panzer Division during most of summer 1944. It is manuscript ETHINT 18 within the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. The content mostly covers the retreat of the author’s division through northern France, and fighting around Aachen, during September 1944. But pages 1-8 describe battles south of the Seine near Elbeuf at the end of August. The initial part of the report, therefore, is of interest to students of the Normandy campaign.

Seaman, Mark and Harris, Tomás: Garbo: The Spy who saved D-Day (The National Archives / Bath Press 2004 edition; 410pp., maps, illustrations). For details of this book’s contents see the description with Harris as first-named author.

‘Selected Intelligence reports, Volume I (June 1944 – November 1944)’ (Office of the A C of S, G-2, First United States Infantry Division, December 1944; 87pp., maps). This is a compendium of intelligence documents produced by the U.S. 1st Infantry Division during the first six months of the north-west European campaign. A digital copy can be found online in the Ike Skelton Combined Arms Research Library on the Fort Leavenworth website. About half the contents relate to the Normandy campaign. Among other interesting items, there is detailed information about 2nd Panzer Division’s order of battle, an account of the handover of eight captured nurses to German forces on 9 July, and a translation of a German withdrawal order from 12 August 1944.

‘Seventh Army High Command, Telephone Conversations, 3 to 16 August 1944’. This English-language translation of the German Seventh Army telephone log for the period 3-16 August 1944 can be found in the US National Archives, Record Group 407, Box 24154, folder ML 485. It is one of two translations of the same document. For details of the other version (which differs slightly in its wording and content) see ‘War Diary – Daily Reports, 7th Army High Command, 3-16 August 1944’. See also ‘War Diary, phone calls and conversations: Army Group B, 31 July – 19 August 1944’ and ‘Seventh Army War Diary, 4-16 August 1944’.

‘Seventh Army Telephone Log, 6 June – 25 July 1944’. This typescript document can be found in the US National Archives in Record Group 407, Box 24154, folder ML 487. It is an English-language translation of the German Seventh Army telephone log for June and July 1944. The contents include summaries of conversations between Seventh Army staff officers and senior personnel belonging to other German formations (especially corps headquarters). The log complements some of the entries contained in the Seventh Army war diary for the same period (‘Seventh Army War Diary, 6 June – 26 July 1944’, QV). After mid-July, entries become fewer in number and generally briefer than those covering the first six weeks of the campaign. The log stops on 25 July, although there are two additional entries for 31 July at the very end (several pages appear to be missing from the document). It is worth adding that a series of conversations from 16-18 July were omitted from this log and that they appear in a separate translation (see ‘Compilation of telephone conversations regarding estimates of the situation and decisions during the period 16-18 July 1944’). See also ‘Telephone Log of the German 7th Army from June 6 to June 30, 1944’. This is another (British, rather than American) translation of part of the same document. There are many differences between the two versions, a few of which are quite significant.

‘Seventh Army War Diary, 6 June – 26 July 1944’. This typescript document can be found in the US National Archives in Record Group 407, Box 24154, folder ML 488, pages 1-194. It is an English-language translation of the German Seventh Army Operations Section war diary, which was captured by Polish forces towards the end of the Normandy campaign. The document covers the period 6 June – 26 July, after which there is a gap until 4 August, when the diary re-commences in a more superficial form (see immediately below). Entries for each day’s fighting until 26 July are quite detailed (at least, down to divisional level). They include information on German plans and intentions, troop movements, the arrival of reinforcements, and operations outside Seventh Army’s zone of responsibility (which from late June was confined to the western part of Lower Normandy). See also a second translation undertaken by a retired U.S. Army officer, Mark Reardon, published in 2012 as ‘Defending Fortress Europe: The War Diary of the German 7th Army in Normandy, 6 June to 26 July 1944’, and also see ‘Seventh Army Telephone Log’.

‘Seventh Army War Diary, 4-16 August 1944’. An English-language version of this document can be found in the US National Archives at College Park, Maryland, in Record Group 407, Box 24154, folder ML 488, pages 194-211. Because this part of the Seventh Army Operations Section war diary is fragmentary and disjointed, its contents were excluded from Mark Reardon’s otherwise excellent ‘Defending Fortress Europe: The War Diary of the German 7th Army in Normandy, 6 June to 26 July 1944’ (QV). However, although there are many gaps in its coverage, the manuscript contains interesting information about Seventh Army’s activities during the later stages of the Normandy campaign. See also ‘War Diary, phone calls and conversations: Army Group B, 31 July – 19 August 1944’; ‘Seventh Army High Command, Telephone Conversations, 3 to 16 August 1944’; and ‘War Diary – Daily Reports, 7th Army High Command, 3-16 August 1944’.

Severloh, Heinrich: WN-62 – Erinnerungen an Omaha Beach Normandie, 6. Juni 1944 (H.E.K. Creativ Verlag, Garbsen 2000; 148pp., maps, illustrations). For details of this book’s contents see the English-language edition (‘WN62 – A German Soldier’s Memories of the Defense of Omaha Beach, Normandy, June 6, 1944’).

Severloh, Heinrich (trans. Le Franc, R.): WN-62 – Mémoires à Omaha Beach, Normandie, 6 Juin 1944 (Editions Heimdal, Bayeux 2000; 155pp., maps, illustrations). This is the French-language version of the author’s ‘WN-62 – Erinnerungen an Omaha Beach Normandie, 6. Juni 1944’ (QV). For details, see the English-language edition (‘WN62 – A German Soldier’s Memories of the Defense of Omaha Beach, Normandy, June 6, 1944’).

Severloh, Heinrich (trans. Wolf, Robert): WN62 – A German Soldier’s Memories of the Defense of Omaha Beach, Normandy, June 6, 1944 (H.E.K. Creativ Verlag, Garbsen 2007; 157pp., maps, illustrations). On D-Day the author served as a member of a German artillery forward observation team stationed in Widerstandsnest (resistance nest) 62 at Omaha Beach. His book describes his experiences from being drafted into the army in 1942, service on the Eastern Front, and his participation in the D-Day fighting. Severloh was captured early on 7 June and the rest of the book describes his experiences in captivity and during the post-war period. The book casts light on issues of commemoration, memorialisation and media representations of the D-Day landings. It also contains some interesting comments about people who join organisations dedicated to re-enacting the events of World War II. This English-language edition contains material not found in earlier (German- and French-language) versions of the book.

Shores, Christopher and Thomas, Chris: 2nd Tactical Air Force, Volume One: Spartan to Normandy, June 1943 to June 1944 (Classic Publications / Ian Allan Publishing Ltd., Hersham 2004; 192pp., maps, illustrations). This is volume one in a detailed war history of the RAF’s 2nd Tactical Air Force (TAF), which played an important role in delivering air support throughout the Normandy campaign. The book focuses on the role of the British, Canadian and other Allied squadrons that made up 2nd TAF. But it also includes a considerable amount of information about the Luftwaffe’s role during summer 1944. The book casts light on the achievements of German flak and fighter units, Luftwaffe aircraft and air crew losses during the campaign, and other subjects (e.g. the air attack on Panzer Group West’s headquarters on 10 June). The section covering June 1944 is on pp.123-89.

Shores, Christopher and Thomas, Chris: 2nd Tactical Air Force, Volume Two: Breakout to Bodenplatte, July 1944 to January 1945 (Classic Publications / Ian Allan Publishing Ltd., Hersham 2005; 192pp., maps, illustrations). This is volume two in a four-part history of the RAF’s 2nd Tactical Air Force (TAF) during World War II. Because it is the second volume in a series, page numbering begins at p.193 and ends at p.384. The book focuses on the role of the British and other Allied squadrons that made up 2nd TAF. But it also includes lots of information about the Luftwaffe’s role during the Normandy campaign. The book casts light on the achievements of German flak and fighter units, Luftwaffe aircraft and air crew losses, and other subjects (e.g. the debate about which pilot attacked Erwin Rommel’s staff car on 17 July). The section covering July and August 1944 is on pp.200-79.

Shores, Christopher and Thomas, Chris: 2nd Tactical Air Force, Volume Four: Squadrons, Camouflage and Markings, Weapons and tactics 1943-1945 (Midland Publishing / Ian Allan Publishing Ltd., Hersham 2008; 172pp., maps, illustrations). This is volume four in a multi-part history of the RAF’s 2nd Tactical Air Force (TAF) during World War II. Because it is the fourth volume in a series, page numbering begins at p.579 and ends at p.752. The book contains orders of battle for Luftflotte 3 – the Luftwaffe command that operated over France during the Normandy campaign - on pp.722-5.

Showalter, Dennis: “Throw them back: German planning and command”, in Penrose, Jane (Ed.): The D-Day Companion (Osprey Publishing Ltd., Oxford 2004), pp.89-110. This book chapter provides an overview of German defensive strategy in the West from 1942 up to the eve of the invasion. Rather bizarrely, the deployment map on p.105 omits 716th Infantry Division, which bore the brunt of the Allied assault on D-Day.

Shulman, Milton: Defeat in the West (Secker and Warburg, London 1947; xv + 336pp., maps, illustrations). This book represents one of the first post-war attempts to analyse the German war effort from a military strategic/operational perspective. It was written by a Canadian intelligence officer who served in north-west Europe and who interrogated many senior German commanders in its immediate aftermath. After a lengthy introduction that describes events up to 1943, Parts IV and V of the book (especially pp.88-177) are mainly concerned with the Normandy campaign. In this section the author quotes from translated documents and makes extensive use of material derived from interrogations to articulate the German perspective on the disasters that befell their forces during summer 1944. The rest of the book takes the story of the western European campaign to the end of the war. An appendix on p.320 lists all those German commanders personally interviewed by the author: it is an impressive collection.

Sierra, Olivier: Ils étaient Là! 1940-1944: L’Occupation vue par l’occupant en Basse-Normandie (Orep Editions, Bayeux 2014; 331pp., illustrations). This French-language book contains over 400 captioned photographs, almost all of them from the personal albums of German personnel who were stationed in Normandy from 1940 onwards. There are also a few photographs of documents, plus a handful of images recorded by French civilians after the Normandy campaign was over.

Sierra, Olivier: L’Ouest occupé. 1940-1944: L’Occupation dans l’ouest de la France à travers les photos personnelles de soldats allemands (Orep Editions, Bayeux 2017; 432pp., illustrations). This French-language book contains over 700 photographs, most of them recorded by German soldiers in western France from 1940-4. A large proportion originate from the initial invasion and occupation period, but there are many from the later years too. Some images were recorded in Lower Normandy, although the majority are from other areas. There are a few colour photos of items of German uniform and badges at the end of the book.

Sievers, Karl (trans. Christensen, no initial given): ‘My Attitude on the Possibility of an Invasion in the Netherlands Area’ (1pp.). This is manuscript B-011 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written by the officer who commanded the 16th Luftwaffe Field Division during the Normandy campaign. As its title suggests, this brief report lists reasons for and against a possible Allied invasion along the Dutch coast (where 16th Luftwaffe Field Division was stationed before D-Day) in mid-1944.

Sievers, Karl (trans. Mysing, no initial given): ‘Employment of the 16 Luftwaffenfelddivision in Holland from 1 Nov 1943 till 1 June 1944’ (9pp.). This is manuscript B-381 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written by the officer who commanded the 16th Luftwaffe Field Division during the Normandy campaign. The manuscript focuses on the division’s organisation and defensive mission in the Netherlands during 1943-44, before it was sent to Normandy.

Sievers, Karl: ‘Report of the commitment of 16th Luftwaffe Field Division in Normandy on both sides of the Orne River estuary, from 1 July to 23 July 1944’ (3pp.). This is manuscript A-959 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written in 1946 by the officer who commanded the 16th Luftwaffe Field Division during the Normandy campaign. This short report describes the organisation and condition of the division at the start of the Normandy campaign and its transfer to the invasion front at the end of June 1944. Despite its title, it contains nothing about combat activities thereafter.

Sievers, Karl: ‘Zeittafel für Antransport und Einsatz der 16.Lw.F.Div. in der Normandie beiderseits von Mitte Juni 1944 bis 22. Juli 1944, aufgestellt durch Kommandeur dieser Div., Generalleutnant a.D. Sievers’ (5pp.). This document is Appendix B to ‘Foreign Military Studies’ manuscript P-157 by Major Walter Carganico (QV). As the title indicates, it is a German-language summary of 16th Luftwaffe Field Division’s activities between mid-June and 25 July 1944. It was written in 1954 by the officer who commanded the division in Normandy. Although not especially detailed and lacking source references, in the absence of any significant publication that describes 16th Luftwaffe Field Division’s experiences in Normandy, it is worth mentioning here.

Simpson, Keith: “A Close Run Thing? D-Day, 6 June 1944: The German Perspective”, in RUSI Journal, June 1994, pp.60-71. This article describes German anti-invasion preparations and campaign planning, Allied invasion plans, German command and control in the West, and the events of D-Day. It concludes that even if the Germans had done some things differently on 6 June 1944, the Allies would still probably have achieved their main objectives.

‘Situation Reports by German Army Commanders in Normandy, May 15 – October 11, 1944’ (Air Ministry Air Historical Branch Translation Number VII/73, 31 July 1948, 76pp.). This is an English-language translation of Army Group B situation reports from May – August 1944, supplemented by some official correspondence from the late summer and autumn. A copy can be found in the UK National Archives, record group AIR 20, reference 7703. The entire text has been reproduced in James Wood’s ‘Army of the West: The Weekly Reports of German Army Group B from Normandy to the West Wall’ (QV).

‘Situation Reports issued by Luftflotte 3 (France), June 1944’ (Air Ministry Air Historical Branch Translation Number VII/126, September 1953, 25pp.). This is a British translation of official Luftwaffe reports on operations during June 1944. A copy can be found in the UK National Archives, record group AIR 20, reference 7708. Daily entries begin on 8 June and cover air, ground and sea operations. The material lacks detail but casts some light on German air force activities during the opening weeks of the campaign. See also ‘Air Operations over the Invasion Front in June 1944’ (Air Ministry Air Historical Branch Translation Number VII/32, 24 June 1947, 5pp.) and ‘The Normandy Invasion, June 1944’ (Air Ministry Air Historical Branch Translation Number VII/31, 23 June 1947, 12pp.).

‘Situation Reports issued by Luftflotte 3 (France), July 1944’ (Air Ministry Air Historical Branch Translation Number VII/127, October 1953, 41pp.). This is a translation of official Luftwaffe reports covering air, sea and ground operations during July 1944. A copy can be found in the UK National Archives, record group AIR 20, reference 7708. Daily entries summarise the land fighting in Normandy, the situation at sea, and partisan activities in the interior. There is also a description of air operations, broken down into two parts. The first part covers Allied air efforts and the second describes German operations. The reports are not especially detailed, but they do include information about German anti-shipping successes and some other interesting matters. See also ‘Calendar of Operations in North-west Europe, July 1944’ (Air Ministry Air Historical Branch Translation Number VII/84, 24 February 1949, 48pp.).

‘Situation Reports issued by Luftflotte 3 (France), August 1944’ (Air Ministry Air Historical Branch Translation Number VII/31, 10 June 1949, 32pp.). This is a translation of an official Luftwaffe document, written by a member of the German Air Historical Branch, probably in 1944. A copy can be found in the UK National Archives, record group AIR 20, reference 7704. Most of the daily reports are produced according to a proforma which summarises operations on land, at sea and in the air (the last sub-divided into Allied and German operations). There are also some entries on French resistance activities. For the last few days of August, the report contains the texts of several German orders and information about the strength of Luftwaffe units in the West.

Skinner, Ian: “The Naval Threat on the Western Flank of Operation Neptune, June 1944”, in The Mariner’s Mirror, Vol. 80, Number 2 (May 1994), pp.178-90. This article describes the activities of Kriegsmarine surface forces and submarines against the Allied invasion armada during June 1944. Close attention is paid to offensive operations by German motor torpedo boats based at Cherbourg. U-boat operations by ‘Group Landwirt’, which operated from Brest and ports in the Bay of Biscay, are also covered. Less attention is given to a destroyer action that took place on the night of 8-9 June off the Ile de Bas; instead, readers are referred to a separate article on that subject (see Watkins, John: “Destroyer Action, Ile de Bas, 9 June 1944”).

Smith, J. Richard and Creek, Eddie: Heinkel He 177 Greif (Chevron Publishing Ltd./Ian Allan Publishing Ltd., Hersham 2008; 209pp., maps, illustrations). This book provides a history of the Luftwaffe’s only proper heavy bomber, several dozen of which participated in the Normandy campaign. Most of the text is focused on the aircraft’s difficult design and development history, but material about the use of He 177s during summer 1944 can be found on pp.135-8. Information about the bomber’s role in air raids against the U.K. during early 1944, which resulted in heavy Luftwaffe losses and a considerable diminution in German offensive air capability by D-Day, appears on pp.114-19 and pp.126-34.

Smith, J. Richard and Creek, Eddie: Focke-Wulf Fw 190, Volume Three: 1944-1945 (Chevron Publishing Ltd./Ian Allan Publishing Ltd., Hersham 2013; 329pp., maps, illustrations). This is the third volume in a meticulously researched history of the Fw 190 fighter aircraft, which equipped many of the Luftwaffe fighter, ground-attack and reconnaissance units that participated in the Normandy campaign. Because it is the third book in a series, page numbering begins at p.679 and continues to p.1008. Part of Chapter 22 (pp.707-22) covers the summer 1944 campaign in the West, including several personal accounts and extracts from unit war diaries. An appendix on pp.978-9 provides additional information about Fw 190 losses during the Normandy campaign.

‘Some Aspects of the German Fighter Effort during the Initial Stages of the Invasion of North-west Europe’ (Air Ministry Air Historical Branch Translation Number VII/19, 18 January 1947, 5pp.). This is a translation of an official Luftwaffe report, written by Oberst Mettig of the German Air Historical Branch in November 1944. A copy can be found in the UK National Archives, record group AIR 20, reference 7700. Mettig served as Chief of Staff of Jagdkorps II during June 1944. His report is based mostly on his own recollections of the Normandy campaign. The text covers key events before and after the invasion, and analyses reasons for the Luftwaffe’s failure.

Sommer, Erich: Luftwaffe Eagle – A WWII German Airman’s Story (Grub Street 2018; 192pp., illustrations). This war memoir was written by a Luftwaffe reconnaissance pilot who served throughout the Second World War. On 2 August 1944 he flew the first jet-powered reconnaissance flight over the Normandy battle area. His experiences during summer 1944 are described on pp.130-5 of his book.

Souchay, Curt: ‘Report concerning my activity as commander of the Seventh and First German army rear area regions, August – September 1944)’ (12pp.). This is manuscript B-003 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written by a German officer who in summer 1944 held military administrative responsibilities in the Le Mans area of France. The author describes the functions carried out by his headquarters and its withdrawal via Chartres and Chalons-sur-Marne into Luxembourg, and finally into Germany, between 7 August and 9 September 1944. The report casts some light on German attempts to reorganise their defences following the U.S. breakout from Normandy at the end of July.

Spayd, P. and Wilkins, Gary (Eds.): Bayerlein: After Action Reports of the Panzer Lehr Division Commander from D-Day to the Ruhr (Schiffer Military History, Atglen 2005; 216pp., maps, illustrations). As its title suggests, this book includes the text of various documents produced soon after the war by Fritz Bayerlein, who commanded the Panzer Lehr Division throughout the Normandy campaign. Many of them relate to his experiences in Normandy, although others deal with events later in the war. All belong to the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. Those that cover the Normandy campaign include: ETHINT 66 (August 1945, ‘An Interview with Genlt Fritz Bayerlein, Panzer Lehr Division Jan – 28 July 1944’); ETHINT 67 (August 1945, ‘Critique of Normandy Breakthrough, Panzer Lehr Division from St. Lo to the Ruhr’); ETHINT 69 (November 1945, ‘An Interview with Genlt Fritz Bayerlein, Pz Lehr Div at the start of Operation ‘Cobra’); A-901 (February 1946, ‘Withdrawal from France’; A-902 (October 1945, ‘Panzer Lehr Division, 24-25 July 1944’); and A-903 (November 1945, ‘Panzer Lehr Division, 15-20 July 1944’). All of these can also be found in Steinhardt, Frederick (Ed.): ‘Panzer Lehr Division 1944-45: Helion WWII German Military Studies, Volume 1’ (QV). In addition, Spayd & Wilkins reproduce (pp.165-79) the text of a February 1946 interrogation report (‘Critical Study of Experiences gained in German Armored Operations’) in which Bayerlein describes the equipment, organisation and use of German panzer divisions on the Eastern and Western fronts, and (pp.180-97) an intelligence bulletin (31 May 1945) in which Bayerlein discusses the features of German tanks and their performance in various theatres of war (among them, Normandy). The book is well illustrated with photographs from official archives and private collections, as well as maps from U.S. official histories and the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ documents themselves.

‘Special Interrogation Report: Genlt Edgar Feuchtinger, Comd 21 Pz Div (6 June 1944 – 25 Aug 1944)’ (Canadian Military Headquarters Historical Section, 25 August 1945; 9pp.). This document was written by a Canadian officer (probably Milton Shulman) following an interview with the man who commanded 21st Panzer Division during the Normandy campaign. It provides information about the formation of 21st Panzer Division, its anti-invasion preparations and operations in Normandy (especially on D-Day). A copy can be found in the U.S. National Archives, Record Group 407, Box 1515. Extracts from pp.4-6 of the report are reproduced in a document located in the UK National Archives, record group WO 223, folder 10.

‘Special Interrogation Report: Field Marshal Karl Rudolph [sic] Gerd von Rundstedt, Commander-in-Chief West’ (Canadian Military Headquarters Historical Section, 1 February 1946; 14pp.). This Canadian interrogation report describes the career of the man who served as Commander-in-Chief West before and during the opening weeks of the Normandy campaign. A copy can be found in the U.S. National Archives, Record Group 407, Box 1516, Folder 101-2.13. The first page of the report describes the condition of the Field Marshal in 1945 (with an interesting reference to the effects of his heavy drinking). His career up to 1944 is covered on pp.2-4. German defensive strategy in the West, and associated issues such as command relationships, are analysed on pp.4-8. Rundstedt’s conduct of the opening weeks of the Normandy campaign are dealt with on pp.8-10. The rest of the report takes his story to the end of the war.

‘Special Interrogation Report: General Eugen Meindl, Commander Second Parachute Corps’ (Canadian Military Headquarters Historical Section, 20 March 1946; 14pp.). This Canadian interrogation report describes the career of the officer who commanded the German II Parachute Corps throughout the Normandy campaign. A copy can be found in the U.S. National Archives, Record Group 407, Box 1516, Folder 101-2.13. Pages 1-5 of the report deal with Meindl’s early life and his military service to 1943. The text goes on to describe Meindl’s command of II Parachute Corps before and during the Normandy campaign (pp.5-7) and his experiences to the end of the war (pp.7-14).

‘Special Interrogation Report: General Günther Blumentritt, Chief of Staff C. in C. West, Commander Twenty-Fifth Army, Commander First Parachute Army’ (Canadian Military Headquarters Historical Section, 22 May 1946; 14pp.). This Canadian interrogation report describes the career of the officer who served as Chief of Staff to Commander-in-Chief West (OB West) before and during the Normandy campaign. A copy can be found in the U.S. National Archives, Record Group 407, Box 1516, Folder 101-2.13. After a short pen-picture of Blumentritt, pages 2-5 deal with his war service up to September 1942. Pages 5-6 cover anti-invasion preparations in the West between then and D-Day, and pp.6-9 describe Blumentritt’s perspective on the Normandy campaign. The remainder of the report takes his story to the end of the war.

‘Special Interrogation Report: Schweppenburg, Leo Frhr Geyr von, Gen, Comdr Pz Gruppe West’ (Canadian Military Headquarters Historical Section, 5 December 1946; 3pp.). This Canadian interrogation report describes the role of the officer who commanded Panzer Group West before and during part of the Normandy campaign. A copy can be found in the U.S. National Archives, Record Group 407, Box 1516, Folder 101-2.13. The report outlines the pre-invasion ‘Panzer Controversy’ and describes Geyr’s role in Normandy up to the time that he was sacked by Hitler in early July. The final few lines of the report note that when approached to support the assassination attempt against Hitler in July, he refused on the basis of his military oath.

‘Special Interrogation Report: General Heinrich Eberbach, Commander Panzer Gruppe West and Fifth Panzer Army’ (Canadian Military Headquarters Historical Section, 9 December 1946; 11pp.). This Canadian interrogation report is based on information provided by the officer who commanded one of the principal German formations involved in the Normandy campaign. It can be found in the UK National Archives, record group WO 208, folder 3167. The report reviews the circumstances in which Eberbach took over command of Panzer Group West from Leo Freiherr Geyr von Schweppenburg in early July 1944 (pp.1-3). It also describes fighting against British and Canadian forces during July and early August (pp.3-9). The final two pages jump forward to late August, describing Eberbach’s role in re-organising the German defence north of the River Seine and his capture by British troops on 31 August.

‘Special Interrogation Report: General Heinrich Freiherr von Lüttwitz, Commander 2 Panzer Division and 47 Panzer Corps’ (Canadian Military Headquarters Historical Section, undated; 8pp.). This Canadian interrogation report describes the role of the officer who commanded 2nd Panzer Division during the Normandy campaign. A copy can be found in the U.S. National Archives, Record Group 407, Box 1516, Folder 101-2.13. The report begins with a short biography of its subject (pp.1-2), followed by an account of his role as commander of 2nd Panzer Division in Normandy (pp.2-5). The last few pages cover General von Lüttwitz’s appointment to command XLVII Panzer Corps in September 1944 and his experiences up to the end of the war.

‘Special Tactical Studies No.27: Experiences from Allied Air Landings’ (MIRS/Lu/STS/27/44, 8 November 1944). See entry under ‘Experiences from Allied Air Landings (MIRS Special Tactical Studies No.27)’.

‘Special Tactical Studies No.29: German Views on Allied Combat Efficiency’ (MIRS/Lu/STS/29/44). See entry under ‘German Views on Allied Combat Efficiency (MIRS Special Tactical Studies No.29)’.

‘Special Tactical Studies No.30: German Views on the Normandy Landing’ (MIRS/Lu/STS/30/44, 28 November 1944). See entry under ‘German Views on the Normandy Landing (MIRS Special Tactical Studies No.30)’.

Mori
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Re: Panzer Voran material request in exchange for copy of my research guide

Post by Mori » 02 Jun 2019 21:11

Hello,

Interesting stuff you're doing. The real value you are adding is in the short summaries of what the sources say. And that's really good.

A piece of advice: you may shorten the narrative when it comes to describing the origin of the document. For example, just write "FMS A-860" instead of "This is manuscript A-860 in the ‘Foreign Military Studies’ series. It was written in autumn 1945 by Major Percy Schramm.", or "TNA AIR/7703" instead of "A copy can be found in the UK National Archives, record group AIR 20, reference 7703". Few readers are familiar with such sources and those who are don't need more than the abreviated reference - all the more since that's what the TNA or the sturmpanzer.com search engines use. (By the way, kudos for pointing both the NARA and the TNA references of some of the documents).

One other thing you could mention, about articles, is whether they are sourced or not. I see articles from amateurs magazine which typically lack any source and have zero value to scholars. It's worth mentioning the point.

Simon Trew 1
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Re: Panzer Voran material request in exchange for copy of my research guide

Post by Simon Trew 1 » 04 Jun 2019 08:12

Thanks Mori,

I appreciate the constructive criticism and encouragement. With many magazine articles I've tried to emphasise where genuinely original research has been carried out - Deprun's superb series in 'Normandie 44' magazine being one example. But I'll certainly have another look at the whole lot when it comes to grouping things under thematic headings. Likewise the references to FMS, which I agree might be shortened. (Incidentally, the bibliography will have an appendix about the FMS as well as including them in the main content - they are such an important source, but not easy to navigate and some of them are still unavailable online. I've paid for many to be scanned from the collection at the USNA.)

Thanks also to a reader of this forum for contacting me and offering to provide several of the Panzer Voran articles. I'm still looking for most of them, though. If readers of this post don't have the magazine themselves, but know somebody who might, I'd be very grateful if they could point that person towards this posting.

Best wishes,

Simon

Mori
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Re: Panzer Voran material request in exchange for copy of my research guide

Post by Mori » 04 Jun 2019 11:26

I know where to find the whole collection of Panzer Voran. It's in a library close to my place. But... I'm doubtful of their value, not to mention serious embarassement with how much the author was fascinated by the German army.

There was a story about the author having shelves and shelved of documents photocopied at BAMA or NARA. He never realized he could order the documents digital for no added price. He tried to sell everything 10 years ago. I don't think he found a buyer.

Simon Trew 1
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Re: Panzer Voran material request in exchange for copy of my research guide

Post by Simon Trew 1 » 04 Jun 2019 21:29

Thanks Mori,

Interesting stuff. I guess you might be right about the PV articles being of limited use. Unfortunately, having only been able to get hold of one to date (which I figured was reasonably interesting even if most of its contents can be found elsewhere) I can't really tell until/unless I see them. Hopefully you or other readers of my post will be able to help me out!

I'm probably including too much in the bibliography, but I'm trying to err on the side of caution and I'm a little bit obsessive about being as comprehensive as possible. I also think that some users of the bibliography will struggle to locate certain sources, and if I can provide alternative routes to the same information then that's no bad thing.

Shelves and shelves of documents? Sounds like heaven to me. My wife would probably disagree. Still, I'm old fashioned and always prefer to work with hard copy material than look at stuff on a screen.

Best wishes,

Simon

Mori
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Re: Panzer Voran material request in exchange for copy of my research guide

Post by Mori » 04 Jun 2019 21:47

Paper copies are more confortable than screens, no doubt. Until you want to share them...

Simon Trew 1
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Re: Panzer Voran material request in exchange for copy of my research guide

Post by Simon Trew 1 » 25 Jun 2019 11:35

Just a quick note to thank a contributor to this forum for contacting me and providing me with copies of a bunch of the Panzer Voran articles. That led to another contact (to my surprise, somebody I knew already) who has the whole set. Problem solved. I am most grateful.

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