What is everyone reading on WW2?

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lobosemcoleira
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Re: What is everyone reading on WW2?

Post by lobosemcoleira » 25 Feb 2018 23:02

I am reading A Memoir from Leni Riefenstahl. Any comments?

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Attrition
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Re: What is everyone reading on WW2?

Post by Attrition » 26 Feb 2018 20:28

Is it a Triumph of your Will? ;O)

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Attrition
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Re: What is everyone reading on WW2?

Post by Attrition » 26 Feb 2018 20:46

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v23/n08/lawrence-h ... e-bismarck

Map: http://cdn.lrb.co.uk/assets/edillus/hogb01_2308_01.pdf


Sinking the ‘Bismarck’ by Lawrence Hogben

...Force H – consisting of Admiral Somerville in Renown, the carrier Ark Royal and the cruiser Sheffield – was in Gibraltar, where on the Friday afternoon, as sports officer of Sheffield and captain of the ship’s hockey team, I was administering a drubbing to the Ark Royal pilots....

Interesting first-person account.

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Lamarck
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Re: What is everyone reading on WW2?

Post by Lamarck » 14 Mar 2018 21:56

I've started reading Alan Clark's Barbarossa: The Russian German Conflict: The Russian-German Conflict, 1941-45, so far, so good.

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Re: What is everyone reading on WW2?

Post by Ianus » 15 Mar 2018 20:29

I've been reading Hans-Ulrich Rudel's memoirs. He pulled off incredible feats and was very eager to get off the ground. There's no trace of Rudel the politician who would emerge in the post-WW2 period, aside from an ideologically driven opposition to Stalin's communism. It's hard to believe the Luftwaffe could produce someone of this caliber when it was the cause of much consternation at that time. I've gone through over 20 memoirs of surviving Nazis, only a few bothered to mention Rudel (typically former soldiers, including ones who got to know him). At least military historians give him some credit, it would be nice to list them all in one place.

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Attrition
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Re: What is everyone reading on WW2?

Post by Attrition » 15 Mar 2018 20:56

I read them in the 70s and found them rather more nazi than that.

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Re: What is everyone reading on WW2?

Post by Skarpskytten » 15 Mar 2018 21:26

I've read Angus Konstams Osprey-book on the Salerno landing. Very well written the first few pages, but when the operations starts Konstam gets bogged down in the details, it's a mess and he looses the broad picture. The maps are not very helpful (they seldom are in Ospreys WW2-books). The books also suffers from a serious case of anglo-centrism, another common Osprey-trait. Can't they find writers who read german?

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Truckman
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Re: What is everyone reading on WW2?

Post by Truckman » 15 Mar 2018 23:20

I just finished "The Fleet At Flood Tide" by James D. Hornfischer, and have started volume one of Adm. Samuel E. Morison's "History of US Naval Operations in WWII"...It's gonna be a long summer... 8-) ...Ben

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Attrition
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The American West and the Nazi East: A Comparative and Interpretive Perspective

Post by Attrition » 17 Mar 2018 18:43

Carroll P. Kakel III. The American West and the Nazi East: A Comparative and Interpretive Perspective. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013. 310 pp. $32.00 (paper), ISBN 978-1-137-35273-6.

Reviewed by Derrick J. Angermeier (University of Georgia)
Published on H-War (March, 2018)
Commissioned by Margaret Sankey (Air War College)

Carroll P. Kakel’s work The American West and the Nazi East applies the comparative model to the early American efforts to expel Native Americans from the West with the Third Reich’s war of extermination in the East. Both projects made use of nationalist rhetoric to gain territory at the expense of racial out-groups, out-groups who experienced severe brutality and genocidal projects of extermination. Kakel engages the topics of “transnational colonialism and comparative genocide” to addresses a significant gap in the scholarship that has failed thus far to fully consider these dark moments together (p. 6).

Kakel primarily argues that both the American push west and the German push east represented “national projects of territorial expansion, racial cleansing, and settler colonization” (p. 7). He divides his argument into three sections highlighting each of those concepts, a decision that does make his points repetitive, but ultimately allows for a clean analysis of both time periods and the topic at hand. Part 1 focuses on the American West and Nazi East as two examples of “continental imperialism” which Kakel, borrowing from Hannah Arendt, defines as “territorial expansion in close geographic continuity to the metropole” (p. 12). Both the American West and Nazi East relied on racial othering that merged imperialist expansion of nearby territory with “exclusionary nationalism” that proved fatal for the indigenous inhabitants (p. 13). Part 2 discusses settler colonialism, the idea that beyond conventional imperialist objectives, like military and trade, the Nazi East and American West “involved a settler population intent on land seizure” (p. 77). Settler colonialism, then, involved replacing the indigenous inhabitants with a settler population, a project which carried “an inherent genocidal imperative” (p. 78). Part 3 explores “frontier genocide,” the idea that the frontier, representing “the edge of empire” promoted expansionary war as a nationalist endeavor. Such wars then “provided both the cover and the pretext for genocidal assaults against allegedly inferior and unwanted out groups” (p. 177). Concluding, Kakel argues that the Holocaust was “a blend of several forms of mass political violence whose patterns, logics, and pathologies can be located in the Early-American settler-colonial project” (p. 217). Kakel acknowledges differences in scale and intensity between Western expansion and the Holocaust, the latter being a unique machination of terror and industry, but ultimately both projects demonstrate continuities in modern history that revolve around racial othering and imperialism.

The American West and the Nazi East is largely a consolidation of secondary material, so anyone reading this book looking for original research shall go wanting. Additionally, much of the German material provided was either written in or translated into English. That said, the sheer amount of material assembled to write this comparative history provides any scholar looking to mine the bibliography with a veritable treasure trove of relevant and up-to-date resources. Kakel’s stated objective was to target a wide audience, hoping to offer value to undergraduate students, postgraduate history specialists, researchers of genocide, and general readers. He delivers on all these accounts as this book provides a valuable and uncharted insight into two dark moments of history. Kakel deserves considerable credit for tackling such an important and scarcely addressed topic. This work would be particularly helpful as a model to students of what the comparative, transnational model can offer historical study. Kakel’s work provides a fascinating and detailed assessment of two atrocity-laden nationalist projects and does so by unearthing profound insight without obscuring the individual histories. Any scholar of transnational history would do well to read this work and incorporate its lessons and approach into their own work and teaching models.

If there is additional discussion of this review, you may access it through the network, at: https://networks.h-net.org/h-war.

Citation: Derrick J. Angermeier. Review of Kakel III, Carroll P., The American West and the Nazi East: A Comparative and Interpretive Perspective. H-War, H-Net Reviews. March, 2018.
URL: http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=44279

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JeroenPollentier
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Re: What is everyone reading on WW2?

Post by JeroenPollentier » 11 Apr 2018 09:23

Dan W. wrote:Image

The Liberator - Alex Kershaw

This book focuses primarily on Felix Sparks, a Captain in the 45th 'Thunderbird' Division, a Division that is often remembered for two things: It's unit crest was originally a Swastika (reflecting on its Native American roots as a National Guard unit from the Southwest) before it changed that to the 'Thunderbird' (also a Native American symbol) and their liberation of Dachau, where some soldiers cracked after over 500 days of battle and shot SS guards.

Kershaw is a great writer, his eye for detail and ability to weave the personal side of the story into the larger picture of an entire Army's advance (5th Army) gives you both an up close and personal view to compliment the much larger, operational view of the advance towards Germany. I've just started reading, and the 45th has recently landed in Sicily (July '43) as it battles Kesselring's well disciplined troops who, even without Italian support, are more than capable defenders. And yes, the book even has maps.

The 45th was originally christened into battle in North Africa against Erwin Rommel's troops, and that is where the book mainly starts, with a preceding chapter devoted to Sparks training.
I'm reading this book now and I've almost finished it. It's very, very good.

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Attrition
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Re: What is everyone reading on WW2?

Post by Attrition » 11 Apr 2018 15:49

~~~~~some soldiers cracked after over 500 days of battle and shot SS guards.~~~~~

Come off it, there's no need for exculpatory circumlocutions. Try

...some soldiers shot SS guards.

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Imad
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Re: What is everyone reading on WW2?

Post by Imad » 24 May 2018 19:56

Kursk The Greatest Battle by Lloyd Clark

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Re: What is everyone reading on WW2?

Post by Imad » 24 May 2018 19:57

The Battle of Britain by Christopher Bishop

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Re: What is everyone reading on WW2?

Post by Dutto1 » 28 May 2018 18:24

Currently reading Island of Fire by Jason D. Mark .

First class book and research.

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Javey74
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Re: What is everyone reading on WW2?

Post by Javey74 » 09 Jun 2018 01:46

I'm making my way through this lot, and I can tell you I'm just over half way at the moment.. :)

Adolf Hitler & Eva Braun on the Obersalzberg
Anne Frank: A History for Today
Auschwitz Death Camp: Rare Photographs from Wartime Archives
Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial [The] (Guidebook)
Auschwitz: A History
Auschwitz: Nazi Death Camp
Churchill War Rooms (Guidebook)
Compact Timeline of World War 2 [The]
Eden Camp - Modern History Theme Museum - The Peoples War 1939-45 (Guidebook)
Gestapo: The Story Behind the Machine of Terror (Kindle Edition)
He Was My Chief (Kindle Edition)
Hitler at Home
Hitler: A Short Biography
Hitler's Henchmen
Hitler's Last Day: Minute by Minute
Hitler's Last Witness: The Memoirs of Hitler's Bodyguard (Kindle Edition)
Hitler's Elite: The SS 1939-45
I Was Hitler's Chauffer: The Memoir of Erich Kempka (Kindle Edition)
Imperial War Museum - London (Guidebook)
Inside Hitler's Bunker: The Last Days of the Third Reich
Lost Album of Auschwitz: The 116 Images of Photographic Album of Karl Hocker
Nuremberg Trials[The]: The Nazis and their Crimes Against Humanity (Kindle Edition)
Oskar Schindler's Enamel Factory (Guidebook)
Story of the SS [The] (Kindle Edition)
Taming the Panzers
Terezin Ghetto [The] (Guidebook)
Terezin, Places of Suffering and Braveness (Guidebook)
Ultimate World War 2 Quiz Book [The]
Weird War Two
World War 2 Trivia (Kindle Edition)
World War 2 Visual Encyclopedia
Want to learn more about WW2? Click here>> https://www.facebook.com/WW2LearningZone

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