What is everyone reading on WW2?

Discussions on books and other reference material on the WW1, Inter-War or WW2 as well as the authors. Hosted by Andy H.
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Big Vern
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Post by Big Vern » 17 Jan 2004 10:59

Hi Steve

[/quote] Posted: Fri Jan 16, 2004 10:10 pm Post subject:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi Vern,

Where did you buy 'I Survived' from.
I s it hardback.



I got it from E-bay. I was so lucky as it was a buy it now for less than a pound. Its well read and quite old.However it is very readable and is hardback. If your interested I'll scan a few pages to you if you PM me withyour email address.
Also got.

The Sword in the Scales. Hans Fritzsche. As told by Hildegard Springer, translated by Diana Pyke and Heinrich Fraenkel.
About the Nurenberg trial of auther, true story.

Swastika in the Air. Karl Bartz. The struggle and defeat of the German air force 1939 - 1945. All theatres covered.

Same source and both for less than a pound each.
Hope this info is useful my friend.

Big Vern
AAAAARRRRGGGGG I've messed up the quote thing...again.

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stevezz1
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Post by stevezz1 » 17 Jan 2004 20:10

Hi Vern,

Many thanks, i will be in touch.

Steve.

Anrhydedda
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Post by Anrhydedda » 19 Jan 2004 23:44

Panzer Leader by Heinz Guderian. Essential, I figure?

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herr oberst
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Post by herr oberst » 20 Jan 2004 10:39

Anrhydedda wrote:Panzer Leader by Heinz Guderian. Essential, I figure?


It is a must read!. I'm now reading two books, Philip warner's the battle of France, 1940 and Clausewitz's On War. I've been reading the latter for a complete month!

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Daryl Leeworthy
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Post by Daryl Leeworthy » 24 Jan 2004 22:32

"The Dark Valley" by Piers Brendon.

Also Eric Hobsbawm's The Age of Empire - fascinating read especially if you like the late C19th/ Early C20th. I like his genuine care for the social history.

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Beppo Schmidt
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Post by Beppo Schmidt » 25 Jan 2004 03:19

Just finished reading The Eagle Has Landed by Jack Higgins, which I found to be better than the movie, and now I'm reading Enemy at the Gates by William Craig. Some horrific stuff in that one about cannibalism among German and Italian prisoners in Siberia.

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Foelkersam
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Post by Foelkersam » 28 Jan 2004 16:31

Hello, I'm reading "Decision in Normandy" by Carlo D'Este. A good book but to much about the British and Montgomery for my taste. I think "Overlord" by Max Hastings is much better.
/F

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Richard Murphy
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Post by Richard Murphy » 29 Jan 2004 02:24

Foelkersam wrote:Hello, I'm reading "Decision in Normandy" by Carlo D'Este. A good book but to much about the British and Montgomery for my taste. I think "Overlord" by Max Hastings is much better.
/F


Cornelius Ryan's Longest Day is still one of the best D-Day books I've read, though Carell's Invasion: They're Coming! is also very good, and I like the chapter in Band of Brothers (I don't think I dare mention the Author!!!) dealing with the airborne assault is also excellent.

For a German point of view of the invasion, try Fighting The Invasion & Fighting In Normandy, both edited by David C. Isby and published by Greenhill and, in the US, Stackpole.

Regards from the Park,

Rich

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Petillon
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Post by Petillon » 29 Jan 2004 18:50

This month I've read four WW2 related books:

1) Barbarossa (Alan Clark): a good read on the Eastern Front

2) Flags of the Third Reich (Brian L. Davis): boring, but maybe useful as a reference

3) Soldiers of the Sun: the rise and fall of the Imperial Japanese army, 1868-1945 (S. Harries): great read, espically the first half. It describes the development of the Japanese army (and by extension of Japan) from the Meiji restoration to the end of WW2. A recommendation.

4) Hermann Göring (Wolfgang Paul): A little bit too pro-Goering and to less critical for my tastes. But certainly a quick read.

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Oberst Mihael
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Post by Oberst Mihael » 29 Jan 2004 21:29

Anrhydedda wrote:Panzer Leader by Heinz Guderian. Essential, I figure?


I'll say. Didn't quite finish it yet, got stuck half way through, a lot of names, hard to chew :)

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Oberst Mihael
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Post by Oberst Mihael » 29 Jan 2004 21:31

Petillon wrote:This month I've read four WW2 related books:

1) Barbarossa (Alan Clark): a good read on the Eastern Front

2) Flags of the Third Reich (Brian L. Davis): boring, but maybe useful as a reference

3) Soldiers of the Sun: the rise and fall of the Imperial Japanese army, 1868-1945 (S. Harries): great read, espically the first half. It describes the development of the Japanese army (and by extension of Japan) from the Meiji restoration to the end of WW2. A recommendation.

4) Hermann Göring (Wolfgang Paul): A little bit too pro-Goering and to less critical for my tastes. But certainly a quick read.


An excellent book! My friend also lent me Göring, so I guess I better start :)

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mikerock
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Post by mikerock » 29 Jan 2004 21:37

I recieved two books in the mail today and yesterday, the first one is for a research paper: "Storm of Steel: The Development of Armor Doctrine in Grmany and the Soviet Union, 1919-1939" and the second is "Wenn Alle Brüder Schweigen: Großer Bildband über die Waffen-SS," the last one has been in the mail for a month, I was beginning to suspect whether it was coming at all... I'm still picking through "Last Victory in Russia," and "With the Jocks."

--Mike

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Kunikov
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Post by Kunikov » 30 Jan 2004 02:20

"Soldier X" by Don Wulffson...a supposidly fictional story about an event that actually did occur during the war, although I have found some aspects of the book lacking. If anyone has read it or is reading it let me know, I would like some opinions. Since I'm an avid reader of "Eastern Front" books I can say I've read most of those which have been listed, starting from Clark's Barbarossa to Guderian's Panzer Leader as well as Beevor's books and "With our Backs to Berlin" as well. Clark's book is lacking, whomever thinks it is a 'great read' should check out John Erickson's two volumes on the war, "The Road to Stalingrad" and "The Road to Berlin" they are the definitive studies in both Russian and English to this day. As for 'with our backs to berlin' I read it a while ago, found it boring and redundent from what I can remember. Beevor's books are also lacking and biased, both Stalingrad and Berlin. "Enemy at the Gates" the book I found to be a better read than Beevors and as for his Berlin book, he contradicts himself and I rather liked Chuikov's account better than Beevors. I've branched off into more general history and fictional stuff "A Painted Bird" by Kosinksi (i believe that's how to spell his last name) is quite interesting but has risen a lot of controversy. Sorry about the rant, if anyone has questions about Eastern Front books I've probably heard of them or read them, so please don't hesitate to ask.

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Robert Rojas
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RE: What is everyone reading?

Post by Robert Rojas » 30 Jan 2004 05:33

Greetings to both brother Kunikov and the community as a whole. Well sir, in respect to your posting of Friday - January 30, 2004 - 2:20am, old Uncle Bob would like to convey my personal thanks for your enthusiastic willingness to share your opinions about the literature gravitating on the Eastern Front during the course of the Second World War. Now, when the time avails itself, you might want to peruse the following thread for your own edification. The thread in question is entitled as ARE RUSSIANS LESS WILLING TO SHARE W.W.II INFORMATION? and it is located within THE LOUNGE section of the forum. The author goes by the nom de plume of David C. Clarke and the thread's creation date is Tuesday - January 13, 2004 - 4:31am. I rather suspect brother Dave will have a wealth of questions for you. Finally, please forgive any presumptuousness on my part. Given the distinct ethnic flavor of your chosen moniker, I am assuming (rightly OR wrongly) that you might very well be an expatriot from what is now the Commonwealth of Independent States. Oh, and by the way, welcome to the neighborhood. In anycase, I would like to bid you a copacetic day over in the Empire State of New York.

Best Regards,
Uncle Bob 8)

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Kunikov
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Re: RE: What is everyone reading?

Post by Kunikov » 30 Jan 2004 14:44

Robert Rojas wrote:Greetings to both brother Kunikov and the community as a whole. Well sir, in respect to your posting of Friday - January 30, 2004 - 2:20am, old Uncle Bob would like to convey my personal thanks for your enthusiastic willingness to share your opinions about the literature gravitating on the Eastern Front during the course of the Second World War. Now, when the time avails itself, you might want to peruse the following thread for your own edification. The thread in question is entitled as ARE RUSSIANS LESS WILLING TO SHARE W.W.II INFORMATION? and it is located within THE LOUNGE section of the forum. The author goes by the nom de plume of David C. Clarke and the thread's creation date is Tuesday - January 13, 2004 - 4:31am. I rather suspect brother Dave will have a wealth of questions for you. Finally, please forgive any presumptuousness on my part. Given the distinct ethnic flavor of your chosen moniker, I am assuming (rightly OR wrongly) that you might very well be an expatriot from what is now the Commonwealth of Independent States. Oh, and by the way, welcome to the neighborhood. In anycase, I would like to bid you a copacetic day over in the Empire State of New York.

Best Regards,
Uncle Bob 8)


Thanks, I'll try to get to that thread as soon as I can. As for my 'moniker' I am from Ukraine although the name I've chosen has some significance. If you have ever read about "Little Land" you will know that "Tsezer Kunikov" was the Red Army Major that landed his troops there without suffering one casualty and it was in fact his diversionary operation that wound up being the main staging point for further Soviet actions against the Germans rather than the intended point of landing and attack.

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