Kershaw: Hitler Biography, Opinions?

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R.W. Black
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Kershaw: Hitler Biography, Opinions?

Post by R.W. Black » 05 Aug 2002 18:12

I've completed both volumes of "Hitler" by Ian Kershaw. I found the two books rather un-insightful in the sense that I did not feel that Kershaw was pervasive enough in explaning Hitler's personality, I realise that he (Kershaw) stated that Hitler had no personality aside from politics, but it seems to me that these two books were elementary and seemed a rather dry introduction into 3rd Reich politics rather than the mind or personality of Hitler.

Would be interested to hear others opinions

Regards,
PWG

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Richard Murphy
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Post by Richard Murphy » 05 Aug 2002 20:36

I thought both were very good, but particularly the first (Hubris), which was full of infomation, particularly with regard to his early life (Up until WW I) that is not examined in the likes of Bullock, Fest, Toland etc.
I would recommend them to anyone, but would be interested in seeing which works (Preferably in English.) Mr. Black would suggest.

Regards from the Park,

Rich

Martin Månsson
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Post by Martin Månsson » 05 Aug 2002 23:00

Have those two books on order and would like to know if one of the sources about AH's early life is Ernst "Putzi" Hanfstaengl ? I'm currently reading an old book written by him about the early days and life of AH and the NSDAP. Very interesting indeed but feels like he overexagerates his own signification a little. However Bullock wrote that no other book covers the early life of Hitler better than this book. Written by a man who stood AH somewhat close and held a official post within the NSDAP until 1938 (Head of the NSDAP foreign media office).

Best
Martin

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Richard Murphy
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Post by Richard Murphy » 05 Aug 2002 23:55

Before reading Sir Ian (Quick dig in the ribs to Mr. Irving!)'s works, I had only come across Hanfstaegel's name in relation to a prank played on him by Göring during the Spanish Civil War, when he managed to convince the poor schmuck that the Führer wanted him dead, after which he fled (Eventually) to England, but his influence is graphically illustrated in Hubris.

Regards from a sleepy Park,

Rich

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Phil V
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Post by Phil V » 06 Aug 2002 06:47

I found HUBRIS excellent. Leart a lot of new information about Hitler's early life. Very well researched and written.

NEMESIS was good but not outstanding.

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R.W. Black
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Post by R.W. Black » 06 Aug 2002 18:47

Interesting responses, I agree somewhat with the assertion that there was information to be gained insomuch as the people that surrounded Hitler, but what about the man himself? In no way is this an attack on Kershaw, his reputation precedes him but could it be that there is sincereley a lack of sources on Hitler as a whole (especially in HUBRIS) that might have comprimised the first volume?

Regards,
-PWG

P.S: In regards to sources or books, I must admit the most amusing biography/freudian "analysis" of Adolf Hitler is "Adolf Hitler: The Psychopathic God". I forget who the authour is but if anyone wants a taste of the rediculous, I encourage you all to read it

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Richard Murphy
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Post by Richard Murphy » 07 Aug 2002 21:52

R.W. Black wrote:In no way is this an attack on Kershaw, his reputation precedes him but could it be that there is sincereley a lack of sources on Hitler as a whole (especially in HUBRIS) that might have comprimised the first volume?


Hubris has 169 pages of footnotes (My only grumble about the works is all that flicking back and forth!) and a thirty page list of works cited, so I can't see how one can complain about a "lack of sources". As to Hitler's early life, and how it influened his actions later, are very thoroughly examined.

Regards from the Park,

Rich

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