German ground to air rockets

Discussions on the equipment used by the Axis forces, apart from the things covered in the other sections. Hosted by Juha Tompuri
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T. A. Gardner
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Re: German ground to air rockets

Post by T. A. Gardner » 14 Jan 2021 01:29

Grzesio wrote:
13 Jan 2021 20:03
Rheintochter R 1 was a two stage rocket, the booster was to be jettisoned a second after launch or so.
The Taifun did have a solid fuelled variant too, offering roughly the same performace, just with slightly bigger weight, actually vast majority of ordered production rockets was solid fuelled.
Foehn in its basic 7,3 cm variant was a very poor weapon, what was clearly recognised by the Germans, who considered it as support for conventional light Flak only, but high performance variants were being developed. BTW, the rocket was never designated as the Hs 297 or Foehn.
No, the Rheintochter R 1 and 3 were two-stage engines but the missile didn't have booster separation. That's why the exhaust nozzles for the second-stage were in the side of the missile, not at the rear. Here's video of the missile being fired. You can clearly see that the booster doesn't drop away and that the second-stage motors have fired in it.


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Grzesio
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Re: German ground to air rockets

Post by Grzesio » 14 Jan 2021 09:23

No, the Rheintochter R 1 and 3 were two-stage engines but the missile didn't have booster separation.
Have you watched the video till the end? ;)
https://youtu.be/Fu5A7LZTgvI?t=86
That's why the exhaust nozzles for the second-stage were in the side of the missile, not at the rear.
The nozzles of the R 1 and R 3p were arranged around the fuselage, because the engine was located in the middle of the fuselage, with the guidance compartment in front of it and the warhead behind it. This layout was chosen to avoid CoG shift due to fuel being combusted. Liquid fuelled R 3f, in turn, had the combustion chamber at the rear end of the fuselage, but with the warhead relocated to the middle of the fuselage, between the propellant tanks.
You can clearly see that the booster doesn't drop away and that the second-stage motors have fired in it.
I can see, the booster is jettisoned in the third shot. ;) The second stage engine does not ignite in any of the three launches filmed, what can be seen, are just tracers located on the wings and tail. I think, these are very initial launches of the missile, testing the booster only and - the last one - stage separation.

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