WW2 German Field Telephone Equipment… The Brustmikrofon

Discussions on the equipment used by the Axis forces, apart from the things covered in the other sections. Hosted by Juha Tompuri
User avatar
Rotwang M
Member
Posts: 52
Joined: 22 Jul 2021 20:10
Location: USA

WW2 German Field Telephone Equipment… The Brustmikrofon

Post by Rotwang M » 23 Nov 2022 13:57

The German armed forces sometimes used a chest microphone (brustmikrofon) with field telephone equipment. The microphones were primarily used by operators on large telephone exchanges with the großer feldklappenschrank and the 20-line switchboard. But, sometimes the microphones were used by operators on smaller 10-line switchboards. Occasionally, the microphones were used by commanders of artillery battalions.

Image

Each microphone plugged into the handset socket of a field telephone or switchboard. There were two, two-pin sockets in the sides of the microphone body to enable the operator to plug in a headphone (kopfhörer).

Image

A neck strap held the microphone on the operator’s chest, for hands-free operation. The operator could then use both hands to manipulate the switchboard, fill out message forms, etc.

Image

The back of the microphone has a clip for securing it to a tunic or great coat. The back cover slides off by turning a screw marked “öffnen” (open).

Image

With the back cover removed, the microphone capsule can be accessed. A regular handset microphone capsule is used.

Image

Image

Various types of headphones could be used with the chest microphone. Single or double speakers were used. All headphones for telephone use had a special two-pin plug. The plug pins were closer together than plugs used on radio sets and armored vehicle intercoms.

Image

Image

Image

The speakers for telephone headphones produce sound when an electro-magnet causes a steel diaphragm to vibrate. The magnet’s coils have a resistance of around 57 ohms. Radio and intercom headsets work the same way but have a much higher coil resistance… 2000 to 4000 ohms. They won’t work when connected to field telephone equipment.

Image

Image

Most WW2 German headphones sold by militaria dealers are for radios and intercoms. The dealers usually don’t list (or even know) what the headphones were used for. Some of the headphones are missing the plugs, so it is impossible to quickly tell if they were for field telephone use. Unless the dealer specifically states that the headphones were for use on field telephone systems, don’t buy them.

Check out my new book on WW2 German field telephone equipment…
https://www.lulu.com/en/us/shop/rotwang ... pageSize=4

Image

Return to “Other Equipment”