Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Discussions on the equipment used by the Axis forces, apart from the things covered in the other sections. Hosted by Juha Tompuri
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sitalkes
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Re: Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Post by sitalkes » 27 Jun 2017 02:16

Once the beach obstacles had been cleared, the unloading could begin. To help with this, there was the Landwasserschlepper (Land-Water-Tractor, or LWS). Of this 7 were available in 1940, 14 made by 1941. This was huge tracked boat was ordered in 1935 for the German Army Engineers to aid river crossing and bridging operations. On the beaches, they would have been used for pulling ashore unpowered assault barges during the invasion and for towing vehicles across the beaches. They would also carry supplies directly ashore during the six hours of falling tide when the barges were grounded. This involved towing a Kässbohrer amphibious trailer (capable of transporting 10-20 tons of freight) behind the LWS. It carried a 3- 5 man crew and 20 passengers. A new version was introduced in 1944 based on the Panzer IV tank.

To enable supplies to get off the ships, there was they navy designed Heavy Landing Bridge and the Army’s Seeschlange floating roadway and Landebrüke 674. For the navy design 1 Krupp, and 1 Dortmunder prototype were built and, after it was found that the latter took a month to erect, eight Krupp units ordered (though later cancelled).
KruppLandingBridge.jpg
It consisted of a platform which was transported to the landing beach by means of 3 linked coasters. At the intended location the 4 legs of the platform were lowered to the sea bed and the platform was raised high enough to allow the coasters to float free. 8 rammed posts secured the legs before the platform was raised to the level required for unloading the ships. The spaces between the platforms and the distance to the shore were spanned by engineer bridges.It was possible (without the need for specialised personnel) to make the Krupp design ready for use at the landing beach within one day. The two prototypes were joined together and used as the “German Jetty” in the Channel Islands until 1979.

One Seeschlange was built and tested in France in 1941. Two others were used in North Africa, and others used in the Balkans and on the Eastern Front. This "floating roadway" was formed from a series of joined modules that could be towed into place to act as a temporary jetty. Moored ships could then either unload their cargo directly onto the roadbed or lower it down onto waiting vehicles via their heavy-duty booms. It could be transported by rail and it was intended to use it in Operation Hercules, the proposed invasion of Malta.

In the winter of 1940/41, the German16th Army (responsible for the largest part of the cross-Channel invasion force) tested a Landebruke 674 mobile prefabricated landing stage.
LandingBridge674.jpg
This was to be carried on the pontoons of the invasion’s first wave troops and assembled in about four hours on shore. It could cope with loads of up to 16 tons. VII Corps, part of 16th Army, planned to transport four of these ramps. Another 16th Army solution was fixed landing bridges which would take about eight days to build. Several wooden versions were tested which were capable of withstanding quite rough conditions for many weeks. The Army provided 600m long temporary bridges capable of carrying a 16-ton load; each first wave invasion division was to transport an 80m run of this bridge, plus a 120m run of an 8-ton bridge, 340m of a trackway for bridges of inflatable boats, and 400m for trestle bridges. In addition, although the British blew up one span of the fun piers at Hastings and Eastbourne, the Germans would have been fixed them with bridging equipment and run ships right up to the piers.

To help with getting over sea walls and crossing gaps or rivers, the Germans had four types of bridgelayers. Firstly, there was the Brückenleger auf Panzer II Ausf. B.
brueckenleger-panzer-ii-1.jpg
It is not known how many of these conversions were made, but four were known to have been in service with the 7th Panzer Division in France in May 1940 (this was one of the divisions that was planned to be used for the invasion). An attempt was made to also make a bridgelayer version of the Panzer 1 but it was decided that both these models were too small to be useful. Instead, the Brückenleger IV was made.

From February to May of 1940, 20 Pz IV Ausf C/Ds were converted by Krupp to bridge layers – the Bruckenleger IVb. 16 vehicles were mounted with bridging equipment by Magirus and 4 by Krupp. The Krupp version used a pivoted A-frame to swing the bridge span from its place on top of the tank across the gap. The Magirus version used hydraulic rams and a tipping frame to slide the bridge frame across the gap. They saw service in Belgium and France in 1940 with 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 5th and 10th Panzer Divisions (four per division, in one platoon in the 3.Panzer-Pionier-Kompanie (armored assault enginneers)). 60 were ordered but the contract was cancelled when it was found that they were rarely used and anyway tactical surprise and the coup de main were more effective tactics. In late 1940, most were converted back to ordinary Panzer IVs. In January of 1941, Krupp completed 4 newer Bruckenleger IVc bridge layers. They saw service in 1941 in Russia with 3rd Panzer Division. The bridge could span 9m (30 feet) and carry 30 tonnes. In the Russian campaign, the Germans were able to capture bridges through speed and bravado, but they must have missed having more of these vehicles, as they lacked the airborne troops used to seize many of the bridges in the Low Countries.

Another type of Panzer IV C bridge layer was the Infanterie Sturmsteg auf PzKpfw IV (Bruckenleger IV s / Sturmstegpanzer). This was a weird looking vehicle that used fire ladders to create a 56m long infantry assault bridge. Only 4 were made, but they saw service in France in 1940 and in Russia in 1941 with 3rd Panzer Division.
infanterie-sturmsteg-panzer-iv-2.jpg
infanterie-sturmsteg-panzer-iv-1.jpg
Finally, there was the Sd.Kfz. 251/7 mittlere Pionierpanzerwagen Ausf. C. This was a standard Sd.Kfz.251 armoured half-track converted for use by panzer pioneer companies .It was fitted with racks to carry a small assault bridge, heavy equipment and other military engineering gear such as mines and tools. The Sd.Kfz.251/7 used by HQ units was fitted with additional radio equipment. 559 Sd Kfz 251’s were built in 1939-40 and there were supposed to be six 251/7’s in each 1940 panzer pioneer company.
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sitalkes
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Re: Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Post by sitalkes » 27 Jun 2017 02:32

PzIVBridgelayer.jpg
PioneerwagenSdKfz251-7.jpg
LWStrailer.jpg
LWSa.jpg
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Clive Mortimore
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Re: Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Post by Clive Mortimore » 30 Jun 2017 18:28

sitalkes wrote:"The Panzer 38(t) Ausf. A mit Schwimmkörper was developed as a result of requirements for Operation Sea Lion the invasion of England late in 1940. The firm of Gebr Sachsenberg in Roslau was responsible for the pontoons which were attached to the sides and front of the Panzer 38(t). Propulsion was was achieved by transferring power from the drive sprocket, whilst in the water, it was capable of 10 km per hour."

150 were built

http://www.wehrmacht-history.com/heer/a ... oerper.htm

400 Panzer 38(t) Ausf. A mit Schwimmkörper, Panzer II Schwimmpanzers, Panzer III Tauchpanzers, Panzer III Befehlswagen Tauchpanzers, and Panzer IV Tauchpanzers were built. The Panzer 38(t) and Panzer II tanks used the same system of pontoons attached to the outside of the vehicle to make them float, with propulsion provided by propellers driven from the final drive system through rods in the pontoons. They could fire their turret guns if necessary. The Tauchpanzers were sealed up and altered to allow their engines to use seawater for cooling. They were to drive along the sea floor. Air was provided for both the crew and to the engine by a flexible 18m long snorkel with an attached buoy and aerial, allowing a maximum operating depth of 15m. Navigation was to be by compass and via instructions over the radio. Once the tank made it to shore, all covers and seals could be blown off and normal combat operations begu
Thank You
Clive

Sturm78
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Re: Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Post by Sturm78 » 18 Sep 2017 22:17

Hi all,

An image from Ebay: Bruckengerat B

Sturm78
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Re: Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Post by Sturm78 » 18 Oct 2017 20:13

Hi all,

An hungarian pontoon ferry. Any information about Hungarian bridge material will be welcome...

Sturm78
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Re: Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Post by Sturm78 » 11 Nov 2017 15:39

Hi all,

Any idea about this pontoon equipment ??

Image from Ebay
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Re: Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Post by SIS 5 » 11 Nov 2017 23:17

Hi Sturm 78,

that´s an interesting question. I think, that it is a ferry made with Brückengerät A. Here a pic with such a bridge building material.

Best regards

Bert
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Sturm78
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Re: Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Post by Sturm78 » 14 Nov 2017 22:31

Bert wrote
that´s an interesting question. I think, that it is a ferry made with Brückengerät A. Here a pic with such a bridge building material.
Uummhhh...I don´t think. The ends of the Brückengerät A pontoons are remarkably high, while the pontoons of my image do not...

Sturm78

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Re: Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Post by SIS 5 » 15 Nov 2017 17:23

Hi Sturm 78,

thank You for Your reply. As far as I know the ends of the Brückengerät A pontoons are not remarkably high, only the fronts. Here two pics and a drawing of Brückengerät A pontoons.

Best regards

Bert
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Sturm78
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Re: Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Post by Sturm78 » 15 Nov 2017 20:44

Bert wrote
thank You for Your reply. As far as I know the ends of the Brückengerät A pontoons are not remarkably high, only the fronts. Here two pics and a drawing of Brückengerät A pontoons.

Thanks for your clarification and your images, Bert. All the pictures I had of these pontoons were from the bow. :oops:
Now I can see that you are right...

Regards Sturm78

Sturm78
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Re: Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Post by Sturm78 » 17 Nov 2017 17:47

Hi all,

An image from Ebay:

Sturm78
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tigre
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Re: Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Post by tigre » 19 Nov 2017 14:09

Hello to all :D; a little more.......................

Landungsboot in action.

Source: http://www.ebay.de/itm/Wehrmacht-Kriegs ... 2509410715.

Cheers. Raul M 8-).
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Sturm78
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Re: Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Post by Sturm78 » 19 Nov 2017 20:37

Hi all,

Pontoon bridge:

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Re: Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Post by Sturm78 » 05 Jan 2018 20:22

Hi all,

An image from Ebay:

Sturm78
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Re: Pontoon Bridges and assault boats

Post by Sturm78 » 14 Jan 2018 12:40

Hi all,

Brückengerät A pontoon bridge ???

Imagef rom Ebay
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