The official AHF other equipment quiz thread

Discussions on the equipment used by the Axis forces, apart from the things covered in the other sections. Hosted by Juha Tompuri
Steuner
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Post by Steuner » 22 Mar 2006 17:05

Enigma??

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Post by Huck » 22 Mar 2006 22:37

Steuner wrote:Enigma??


No, this computing device had no input keyboard, and it was quite larger than Enigma.

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Post by Huck » 23 Mar 2006 23:10

Another hint:

It was the first computer that could do differentiation in real time (in fact it could solve sets of differential ecuations that fast), a big achievement at that time!
Last edited by Huck on 23 Mar 2006 23:41, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Huck » 23 Mar 2006 23:12

And by the way, this device was mass produced.
Think of a military application that needed real time differentiation.

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Post by Steuner » 24 Mar 2006 16:58

Duno o;O

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Post by Huck » 24 Mar 2006 17:49

Steuner wrote:Duno o;O

Steuner


That doesn't matter, maybe the answer is not so easy, just try some more. And this is true for everybody, don't be afraid to voice an opinion.

I'll give another two details:

- it was the first electronic analog computer in the world, this is why it was so fast in what it was doing, the downside was that it was not programmable, it could compute only the thing it was built for (this is true for all analog computers).

- what it was computing was a set of differential equations needed for ballistics; there were other mechanical or electro-mechanical devices that could very roughly approximate the same equations (with simple linear or second degree polynomials), used for instance in naval gunnery, but this device could compute the result of actual equations, and made its unique application possible (without this precision computation its application wouldn't have worked)

So what is it? :)

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Post by Steuner » 24 Mar 2006 22:17

1) Calculate how a Tank should fire at enemy's to hit them

2) same as 1) only with a ship

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Post by Huck » 25 Mar 2006 00:43

Steuner wrote:1) Calculate how a Tank should fire at enemy's to hit them

2) same as 1) only with a ship

Steuner


Neither is correct. Large Kriegsmarine ships did have a (standardized) fire computer that took target data from radar and optical rangefinder and computed a fire solution, fire computer that was copied after the war for USN ships. But it was big compared with this one which was not larger than a cabinet, and it was nowhere as precise (despite that Kriegsmarine ships' fire computers were the most precise to that date). Tanks did not have real fire computers during ww2, only a few of them had reasonably good gunsights.

This device had to be this precise because a small error could lead to a few miles miss for the projectile. What could it be? :)

Now, I guess what is left of my original question is: what is the vehicle carring this computer?

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Post by Steuner » 25 Mar 2006 13:47

Hmm I must say Hard one !!

Its the first computer that allows German bombers to attack more precise...

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Post by Huck » 27 Mar 2006 10:15

Steuner wrote:Hmm I must say Hard one !!

Its the first computer that allows German bombers to attack more precise...

Steuner


No, but you are getting closer. It was used for a sort of aerial attack and more than 5000 were manufactured.
After the war its designer was involved in NASA's moon landing program.

Now it should be easy to name the carrier of this device :)

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Post by Jon G. » 27 Mar 2006 10:33

X-Gerät?

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Post by Huck » 27 Mar 2006 11:11

Jon G. wrote:X-Gerät?


No.

Last couple of hints:
Its designer was employed by NASA to design the flight computer of Saturn V.
The carrier vehicle of this device was at some point supersonic.

So what's the name of the carrier (the name of the device is a bit difficult to find but you are welcome to look for it)?

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Post by fredleander » 27 Mar 2006 11:25

V-2

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Post by Huck » 27 Mar 2006 17:35

leandros wrote:V-2


Yes, your answer is correct.
The device was called "Mischgerät" (Mixing Machine), and it was the "brain" of V-2.

It scored a number of firsts:
It was the first electronic analog computer, the first flight computer, the first computer that could solve sets of differential equations in real time. Mischgerät role was to constantly adjust V-2 trajectory with high accuracy.

The man who invented it was Helmut Hoelzer. After the war, he worked in US in von Braun's team.

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Post by fredleander » 27 Mar 2006 18:07

What is this?
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