Soldbuch: only filled out in Sütterlinschrift or sometimes regular cursive?

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DerFreiKorpMann
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Soldbuch: only filled out in Sütterlinschrift or sometimes regular cursive?

Post by DerFreiKorpMann » 10 Jan 2020 19:45

Were most Soldbuchs filled out in Sütterlinschrift or were there examples that were written in regular cursive? Was regular cursive a common or authentic way to fill out a Soldbuch?
Potz, Mohren, Blitz und Kreuzelement,
Wer den Fritz und seine Soldaten noch nicht kennt!"

Damn bloody hell
Upon anyone still not knowing Fritz and his soldiers!"

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hucks216
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Re: Soldbuch: only filled out in Sütterlinschrift or sometimes regular cursive?

Post by hucks216 » 11 Jan 2020 15:00

The vast majority of Soldbücher were filled out in normal handwriting. Not everyone could read Sütterlin so it wouldn't be much use when it came to inspecting the Soldbuch if the person couldn't make head nor tail of the entries. I dare say that there are some exceptions to the rule but they are rare to find.

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fusilier1944
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Re: Soldbuch: only filled out in Sütterlinschrift or sometimes regular cursive?

Post by fusilier1944 » 12 Jan 2020 04:39

Handwriting is a very personal/individual thing. (Mine is atrocious). It would be common to see Soldbuchs with multiple entries by multiple people. Sütterlin was taught in the German schools for most of the 1930s. Older generations may have been taught differently. What we call cursive is very similar to the Deutche Normalschrift of the 1940s. Kurrent was also an earlier but similar type of handwriting. You can find fonts for you computer that mimic many handwriting styles if you want to print out other faux handwritten documents.

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