Nazi Third Reich Font

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Ken
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Nazi Third Reich Font

Post by Ken » 23 Feb 2003 07:41

In a lot of posters, propaganda, art and such.. you see a Nazi font used for the text.. It's almost always the same font.. and you can tell that it's a Nazi font just by looking at it..

Does anyone know where that came about from? How that started? Who did the art/calligraphy that became the Nazi font?

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Johannes
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Post by Johannes » 23 Feb 2003 07:44

I believe you meant the Gothic font. If I remember clearly it dates back the time even way before Skakespare.

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Nagelfar
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Post by Nagelfar » 23 Feb 2003 12:28

'Gothic' is more 'round' & wider than the german 'Fraktur', gothic is more associated with old english writing, sometimes called "black letter"..

I started a thread on this very topic awhile back:

Nazi Type Face Thread, Fraktur abolished in Nazi Germany

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Zachary
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Post by Zachary » 23 Feb 2003 15:34

I always wondered about that too. I always thought it was our "Old English" font.

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Nagelfar
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Post by Nagelfar » 25 Feb 2003 14:55

There is some cross over, but they have certain stylistic differences between them. gothic is more based on 'fleur de lis' going through the individual letters; fractur/fraktur is more based on sharp bends in the letter serifs themselves, solid, lacking any extraneous 'lines without beadth' interjecting the characters, whereas gothic can be rounded and still keep its effect by that means, fraktur usually couldn't.

some examples:
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