Actors who fought during wartime

Discussions on WW2 and pre-WW2 related movies, games, military art and other fiction.
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Brian Ross
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Post by Brian Ross » 28 Nov 2006 13:37

D. Löwenhamn wrote:Once again. Please respect the focus of this section. Post-world war two subjects should be discussed in other parts of the forum.

Best regards/ Daniel


Errr, that lets out most movies about WWII, as they were, afterall, made after WWII!

I am unsure why you're admonishing people in this way, actually. Would you care to explain your view a little better and provide examples of where "the focus" of "this section" wasn't being addressed?

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Daniel L
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Post by Daniel L » 28 Nov 2006 14:03

The description of the focus of this section is as follows "Discussions on WW2 and pre-WW2 related movies and games as well as fiction." This means that historical movies and games dealing with subjects up til the end of world war two is the focus. This includes fiction based on this period.

Best regards/ Daniel

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Brian Ross
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Post by Brian Ross » 28 Nov 2006 14:10

OK, I can see two references - Michael Caine and Roger Moore who served post-WWII - but it should be noted have starred in numerous WWII related movies. So why have you got a bee in your bonnet?

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Daniel L
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Post by Daniel L » 28 Nov 2006 16:16

A bee in my bonnet? I'm trying to do my job as a moderator. It gets very tiresome to point out to members what the focus of this section is and needing to move threads from this section every week.

Best regards/ Daniel

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Post by Potsdamerplatz » 28 Nov 2006 19:21

Thanks to everyone for getting involved in the thread and providing such great information (especially Edward N. Kelly and Brian Ross)

Here are a few others:

Leo McKern
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0571674

Served as a Corporal in the Royal Engineering Corps in Victoria during World War II.


Lee Marvin
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001511

Enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps at the beginning of World War II. In the battle of Saipan in June 1944, he was wounded in the buttocks by Japanese fire which severed his sciatic nerve and received a medical discharge.


Donald Pleasance
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000587

During World War II he served in the RAF, was shot down and held in a POW camp. He later reprised this role as the forger Colin Blythe in "The Great Escape" (1963)


Gene Autry
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000810

During World War II he enlisted in the US Army and was assigned as a flight officer from 1942-46 with the Air Transport Command.


Burt Lancaster
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000044

Burt Lancaster served in the Army and it was the USO which first gave him the idea of getting involved in acting after the end of hostilities.

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Brian Ross
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Post by Brian Ross » 28 Nov 2006 22:55

D. Löwenhamn wrote:A bee in my bonnet? I'm trying to do my job as a moderator. It gets very tiresome to point out to members what the focus of this section is and needing to move threads from this section every week.

Best regards/ Daniel


I'm not disputing that you should do your job as moderator, what I'm trying to get a handle on is the reason for your sudden announcement. As I said, I can't see why you decided to make it. I'm very interested to see open and fair moderation and I could not see a reason for the pronouncement.
Last edited by Brian Ross on 28 Nov 2006 23:09, edited 1 time in total.

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Daniel L
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Post by Daniel L » 28 Nov 2006 23:07

I browsed through the thread. Observed Caine and Moore mentioned and thus my comment. Now, please continue the thread.

Best regards/ Daniel

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Post by Potsdamerplatz » 28 Nov 2006 23:12

Here is an interesting one:

Will Hay
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0370547

The British actor/comedian Will Hay was commissioned as a Sub-Lieutenant in the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve and instructed on navigation and astronomy to cadets. He was awarded a medal for his work. He also made the short documentary "Go to Blazes" (1942) in which he showed how to deal with incendiary bombs.

Best regards.

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edward_n_kelly
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Post by edward_n_kelly » 29 Nov 2006 02:03

D. Löwenhamn wrote:The description of the focus of this section is as follows "Discussions on WW2 and pre-WW2 related movies and games as well as fiction." This means that historical movies and games dealing with subjects up til the end of world war two is the focus. This includes fiction based on this period.

Best regards/ Daniel


Well the first post in this thread said:


I am hoping everyone can help compile a list of actors (both famous and not so famous) who fought during wartime whether it be World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm etc.



and answers were in reaction to that.

As to the:


The description of the focus of this section is as follows "Discussions on WW2 and pre-WW2 related movies and games as well as fiction."



Where is that stated (other than in your post)?

Edward

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Sewer King
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Post by Sewer King » 29 Nov 2006 05:35

Fallschirmjäger wrote:There is a good book is saw that was on this subject and there where lots in it,now what was the name?

There are several similar books, one of which is Stars in the Corps (Naval Institute Press, 1999), which counts all the Marine Corps veterans who went on to stardom or celebrity in film, sports, etc. It seems natural for history-conscious Marines to have compiled such a book. Spinoff volumes include Stars in Blue and Stars in Khaki for the Navy and Army respectively

Rod Serling is best remembered as creator, host, and narrator of his TV series The Twilight Zone. He was a paratrooper in 11th Airborne Division in the retaking of the Philippines. He was injured by shrapnel at the retaking of Corregidor's "Topside" and spent the rest of the campaign in hospital. The stories he wrote during his long convalescence led to a literary interest and became the basis for his famous show.

Toshiro Mifune, the "John Wayne of Japan", served in the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force. He was in air photo reconnaissance, in China.

Charles Durning had landed at Normandy, was wounded by a German S-mine and fought through to the Battle of the Bulge. There he was one of the three survivors of the infamous Malmedy Massacre, and his testimony was naturally important to its prosecution -- it might make interesting reading today. Durning seldom spoke of it in all the years after, although he worked off-screen in many veterans benefits. Besides his various films over the years (The Sting; The Final Countdown), he still appears on TV today, even as a cartoon voice (Family Guy).

Don Adams, best remembered as Maxwell Smart, Agent 86 of the 1960s TV spy comedy Get Smart, had been a US Marine infantryman at Guadalcanal, where he became the only survivor of his platoon. Later he was a Marine drill instructor. A long way from "Agent 86" and his cartoon voices as Tennessee Tuxedo (1960s) and Inspector Gadget (1980s).

Eddie Albert, of another 1960s TV comedy Green Acres, had been US Navy Lieutenant Edward A. Heimberger at Tarawa. His rescue of seventy Marines under fire earned him a Bronze Star.

James Doohan is best remembered as starship engineer Scotty in the original Star Trek TV series and later movies. He fought at Normandy with the Royal Canadian Artillery, lost a finger on one hand and later served in the RCAF in spotter planes. He had a "bad boy" pilot reputation for doing things like flying slalom between telephone poles. Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry had himself served with the USAAF, in a B-17 unit out of Espiritu Santo in the South Pacific.

Humphrey Bogart had served as a lower-deck US Navy sailor during World War I, on board the transport USS Leviathan. One account has it that when his ship was attacked, he suffered a facial injury that scarred his mouth and thus added to his gangster and tough-guy film roles. Another version held that it was caused by a naval prisoner in his custody, who had injured his face in an escape attempt.

Tyrone Power, the classic movie idol, was commissioned in the US Marines in World War II, but was considered too old for combat aviation and became a transport pilot instead. His unit flew in support of the Marianas campaign, as well as Iwo Jima.

Henry Fonda had served as a 'keys" (quartermaster) on board destroyer USS Satterlee during World War II, later becoming an air intelligence officer in the central Pacific. I am not sure, but I think he found that if he had remained on board Satterlee he would likely have been killed, for when that ship was hit by a kamikaze later in the war, it demolished his duty station. Fonda put this experience directly to use in Mister Roberts, both on stage and on film, even wearing his original Navy uniform. While working in air intelligence he had to keep track of aviators missing in action -- including one Ensign George H.W. Bush, shot down over the Bonin Islands and rescued by submarine.

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Post by edward_n_kelly » 29 Nov 2006 05:52

Not to mention James Doohan of Star Trek who lost a finger at D-Day. He was a Lt in Royal Canadian Artillery when his finger was "detached" by 3 bullets on the night of the landing. Went onto be an AOP pilot apparently.

Edward

Forgot Roger Livesey ("Life and Death of Colonel Blimp" and "Ill met by Moonlight") - volunteered for flying duties in the R.A.F. He was turned down as too old to fly so went to work in an aircraft factory at Desford aerodrome near Leicester to 'do his bit for the war effort.'

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Post by edward_n_kelly » 29 Nov 2006 07:59

Phillip (or Philip) St John Basil Rathbone MC

"....enlisted 3/14 Btn (London Scottish) The London Regiment on 30th March 1916 declaring previous service with Repton School OTC. He served with them as a Private and applied for a Commission in the Territorial Force with the Liverpool Scottish (10th Kings Liverpools) which was granted 24th January 1917...."


He was awarded an MC as notified in the London Gazette Issue 30997 published on the 5 November 1918. Page 36.


Edward

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Fallschirmjäger
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Had that one

Post by Fallschirmjäger » 30 Nov 2006 05:28

Lee Marvin
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001511quote="[Potsdamerplatz"]

Enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps at the beginning of World War II. In the battle of Saipan in June 1944, he was wounded in the buttocks by Japanese fire which severed his sciatic nerve and received a medical discharge.

You know i mentioned that one already dont you Potsdamerplatz,but with no extra info shown,but mine was in the the link. :lol: .
Last edited by Fallschirmjäger on 30 Nov 2006 08:24, edited 4 times in total.

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Brian Ross
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Post by Brian Ross » 30 Nov 2006 06:02

Victor McLaglen - eldest of eight brothers, attempted to serve in the Boer War by joining the Life Guards, though his father secured his release. When the First World War broke out, McLaglen joined the Irish Fusiliers and soldiered in the Middle East, eventually rising through the ranks to the rank of Captain and serving as Provost Marshal for the city of Baghdad.

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Post by Potsdamerplatz » 30 Nov 2006 09:55

DIRK BOGARDE
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001958

In 1940 Derek Bogarde joined the Queen's Royal Regiment as an officer. He served in the Air Photographic Intelligence Unit and eventually attained the rank of major. Nicknamed "Pippin" and "Pip" during the war, he was awarded seven medals in his five years of active duty. He wrote poems and painted during the war, and in 1943, a small magazine published one of his poems, "Steel Cathedrals," which subsequently was anthologized. His paintings of the war are part of the Imperial War Museum's collection.

Similar to his character, Captain Hargreaves, in "King & Country" (1964), Derek Bogarde was called upon to put a wounded soldier out of his misery, a tale recounted in one of his seven volumes of autobiography. While serving with the Air Photographic Intelligence Unit, he took part in the liberation of the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, which he said was akin to "looking into Dante's Inferno".

In one of his autobiographies, he wrote, "At 24, the age I was then, deep shock stays registered forever. An internal tattooing which is removable only by surgery, it cannot be conveniently sponged away by time."

Bogarde also took part in D-Day (June 1944) and Operation Market Garden (September 1944)

In April 1945 he was one of the first Allied officers to reach the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany, an experience that had the most profound effect on him and about which he found it difficult to speak for several decades afterwards. His horror and revulsion at the cruelty and inhumanity that he witnessed in Belsen left him with a deep-seated hostility towards Germany; he wrote in the 1990s that he would get out of a lift/elevator rather than ride with a German. Ironically, three of his more memorable film roles would be playing a German, one of them as a former SS officer.


Best regards.

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