More on Cruise's Stauffenberg film

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ChristopherPerrien
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Re: More on Cruise's Stauffenberg film

Post by ChristopherPerrien » 08 Dec 2009 23:52

P. J. G. Effer wrote:Does anyone know how I can find the name of the actress who played the very pretty nurse?
Welcome to the forum ,have you triedhttp://www.imdb.com/title/tt0985699/fullcredits#cast

Chris

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Walküre
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Re: More on Cruise's Stauffenberg film

Post by Walküre » 09 Dec 2009 00:17

P. J. G. Effer wrote:Does anyone know how I can find the name of the actress who played the very pretty nurse?
Which scene are you referring to?

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Adam Carr
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Re: More on Cruise's Stauffenberg film

Post by Adam Carr » 29 Apr 2010 14:45

I've now seen the 2004 German production "Stauffenberg" (marketted with English subtitles as "Operation Valkyrie"), starring Sebastian Koch as Stauffenberg. I won't say it's better than the Cruise film, because the fact that it's in German inevitably makes it seem more authentic and therefore better. But it's certainly no worse, and I'll bet it cost a great deal less to make. The cast includes Hardy Kruger Jr as Werner von Haeften, and he looks very like his father. Like the Cruise film, it gives only the sketchiest idea of the political background, and allows the viewer to think that the whole plan was Stauffenberg's idea, which of course is nonsense. Beck and Tresckow appear, but their roles are never explained.
Goerdeler doesn't appear at all.

What's astonishing, though, is how closely the Cruise film follows the scenario of the German film. Of course both films have to follow the chronology of the real-life events, but even so I would have expected a director making a new film only three years after the first one to make some effort to make a different film.

The one jarring note in the German film is Stauffenberg's little speech direct to the camera just before Fromm arrests him, in which he basically says "here's looking forward to the liberal democratic Germany of the future." That's no doubt very comforting for German audiences, but in fact Stauffenberg wasn't a liberal democrat at all, he was a mystical Catholic conservative and a German nationalist.

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valkyrie
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Re: More on Cruise's Stauffenberg film

Post by valkyrie » 29 Apr 2010 16:59

Hi Adam - I have to disagree. I think the casting and accuracy was very much superior in the Cruise effort. The only aspects of the German film I liked were the greater accuracy/completeness re. Beck's suicide/killing and the inclusion of Claus' brother Berthold. But in the Cruise film I really liked the inclusion of Tresckow's Macrh 1943 Flash attempt and the July 15 1944 Valkyrie misfire. To your point, both films essentially slander Olbricht and Fellgiebel the same way.

Interestingly, I believe the family rather hated the German verison while liking the Hollywood effort.

Similarly, Stauffenberg expert Peter Hoffmann (who was lead advisor on the Hollywood version and who is therefore a bit biased) savaged the Jo Baer film - I think long before the remake was even under consideration. I posted his review elsewhere on this site (see actual review posted a couple of messages down at http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic. ... 4&t=140660).

I guess the films are very similar because, absent taking a mini-series approach and significant time and $ budget increase, you have to focus on the Wolfsschanze bombing itself and the following coup misfire in order to tell the story. Then you essentially get the same film if you try to respect the historical record. As the producers' stated intent was to bring the Valkyrie story to a wider audience than the German film (and to make more money), I think they achieved their goals.

I actually can't watch the German film now without the many inaccuracies grating my nerves. But its personal taste.

Colin

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Adam Carr
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Re: More on Cruise's Stauffenberg film

Post by Adam Carr » 30 Apr 2010 02:23

Thanks for those comments and for directing me to that review. By coincidence I'm just starting to read Hoffman's "Stauffenberg." I hadn't realised some of those scenes were inventions. The real deficiency of both films, inevitable given the format, is the stripping away of the political context and history, leaving essentially an action drama.

Some gay filmmaker should make a film about the three young Stauffenberg brothers, the Stefan George "Secret Germany" circle and Berthold Stauffenberg's relationship with Frank Mehnert. Hoffman drops hints about all this but never tells the full story (whatever it is).

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Re: More on Cruise's Stauffenberg film

Post by Worldwarstoday » 09 Aug 2012 22:48

How historically accurate is Valkyrie?

Professor Brendan Simms from the University of Cambridge gives his opinion on the historical accuracy of the movie:

http://www.worldwarstoday.co.uk/2011/10 ... kyrie.html

I have to agree with him. I think the movie was well researched with only a few minor historical inaccuracies.

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Re: More on Cruise's Stauffenberg film

Post by Annelie » 24 Oct 2012 23:27

Sorry, I don't remember if someone has already posted this but I found it interesting.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/celebri ... kyrie.html

Tom Cruise refused to meet Hitler's former bodyguard during making of Valkyrie

Tom Cruise refused to meet Adolf Hitler's last surviving bodyguard during the making of Valkyrie, his new film about an assassination attempt on the Nazi leader.

Rochus Misch: At the time of the plot Misch was an Oberscharfuhrer in the SS and worked as a bodyguard, courier and telephone operator for Hitler Photo: CHRISTIAN JUNGEBOLT
11:10AM GMT 22 Jan 2009
Rochus Misch, 91, who still lives in Berlin was at Hitler's side from 1940 to 1945 and was with the Fuhrer in his bunker in the last days of his life.

Screenwriter Christopher McQuarrie interviewed him as part of research for the film Valkyrie.

But Cruise told the Los Angeles Times: "I didn't want to meet him. Evil is still evil, I don't care how old you are."

In the film Cruise plays Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg, who led a failed plot to assassinate Hitler in 1944.

At the time of the plot Misch was an Oberscharfuhrer in the SS and worked as a bodyguard, courier and telephone operator for Hitler.

He travelled with Hitler from bunker to bunker during the Second World War.

On January 16, 1945, following the German defeat in the Battle of the Bulge he moved with Hitler into the Fuhrerbunker in Berlin, where he handled all direct communications with the outside world.

He saw Hitler's body after his suicide and then fled the bunker before being captured by the Red Army.

He was released in 1954 and has lived in Berlin ever since. He is the last survivor of the Fuhrerbunker.

Misch told The Sun: "Hitler was my Fuhrer like everyone else's and I was in awe of him.

"I knew Stauffenberg. He killed comrades. It's the worst thing a soldier can do. It was not the actions of an officer."


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valkyrie
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Re: More on Cruise's Stauffenberg film

Post by valkyrie » 25 Oct 2012 02:41

I have to admit I am with Tom on this one - although he overstated it when he called Misch evil (by implication). Can you imagine what the media wpuld have made of evil Scientologist Cruise playing court on an unrepentant Hitler admirer? It would have made couch jumping look like a minor scuffle.

And While I understand Misch's position, he is wrong. The other thing I don't get is why this man, who was a basic functionary in Hitler's HQ, gets all the attention and praise from autograph hunters. He gets talked up as if he had a Kight's Cross.

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Annelie
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Re: More on Cruise's Stauffenberg film

Post by Annelie » 25 Oct 2012 03:02

The other thing I don't get is why this man, who was a basic functionary in Hitler's HQ, gets all the attention and praise from autograph hunters. He gets talked up as if he had a Kight's Cross.
I can't answer for the others but I surmise that it could be because he is one of the last
people in the bunker, in essence the last piece of history still alive. Someone whom people
could connect history with?

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BillHermann
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Re: More on Cruise's Stauffenberg film

Post by BillHermann » 26 Oct 2012 08:49

Annelie wrote:
The other thing I don't get is why this man, who was a basic functionary in Hitler's HQ, gets all the attention and praise from autograph hunters. He gets talked up as if he had a Kight's Cross.
I can't answer for the others but I surmise that it could be because he is one of the last
people in the bunker, in essence the last piece of history still alive. Someone whom people
could connect history with?

As far as I'm concerned with veterans from all counties leave them in peace unless they want the attention. Even the more famous ones like Otto Carius or ones that gained some notoriety because they are the sole survivor deserve our respect. Give them their space as hunting them down for a signature simply for post war fame and personal gain is tragic. They were doing a job which was hard and in some cases awful. Here we are turning these people into stars when they were just regular people doing a job.

If you are lucky to have met veterans from any side of the conflict you will get more respect talking about football current events, simply treating them like people. I always find it entertaining when I see people salivating at the chance to have tea with Rochus Misch as it would be the best thing ever.

With Tom Cruise though I'm not surprised however I think it's unfortunate not because it was rude but because as an actor it goes with the territory. But it was his choice, move on. As for Rochus Misch its interesting how years after there is still the need to support Hitler and condone Stauffenberg however as we all know there were many, even some at the top that were itching to rid hitler from Germany, even some of his top supporters near the end.

As for the movie, it was well done, great direction, good locations with minor picks. For me the hardest part was Tom Cruise. Not that I have an issue with him, he was just out of place. Having studied the plot in detail it was one of the best versions so far. I found the character Otto Ernst Remer and his loyalty well depicted. I also found it interesting how the movie almost downplayed the SS in the story.

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Re: More on Cruise's Stauffenberg film

Post by Replicant » 11 Mar 2017 19:11

Adam Carr wrote:Thanks for those comments and for directing me to that review. By coincidence I'm just starting to read Hoffman's "Stauffenberg." I hadn't realised some of those scenes were inventions. The real deficiency of both films, inevitable given the format, is the stripping away of the political context and history, leaving essentially an action drama.

Some gay filmmaker should make a film about the three young Stauffenberg brothers, the Stefan George "Secret Germany" circle and Berthold Stauffenberg's relationship with Frank Mehnert. Hoffman drops hints about all this but never tells the full story (whatever it is).
I remember reading that Berthold and Frank Mehnert were good friends but nothing beyond that. Hoffmann hinted that Mehnert may or may not secretly have had deeper feelings for Berthold, but Berthold was deeply in love with his future wife Maria Classen and he waited 10 years to be able to marry her, since it was against his father's wishes. Most confusion about Mehnert in that regard comes from the fact that he was, like the circle's leader Stefan George, adamantly opposed to Berthold's marriage to her. To add to this confusion, it is known that because Frank Mehnert was fiercely loyal to Stefan George he took this defiance against the "Master" very badly and even stopped talking to Berthold after he married until about 1939, saying something like "how could you go against the Masters' wishes". But as Robert Boehringer (another member of the circle) wrote, Berthold apparently wasn't much phased by any of this because he had waited a long time to marry Maria Classen and that superseded the objections of his friends and all other considerations.

P.S.: Lol sorry for necroposting x_x I'm not sure if it is allowed or not (I just joined the forum).

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