Story of ...

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K.Kocjancic
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Story of ...

Post by K.Kocjancic » 19 Jul 2003 13:07

I would like to share a short story of my grand-father's uncle. Before the WWI he went to USA and got rich. When the WWI started, he came home, volunteered into army. And was send to Galicia. In first week of his duty he was KIA by direct mortar hit. A "friend" of his then cut off his fingers to get his golden rings, with an excuse, that he will send the rings to his family. Our family until now didn't get any of his rings.

Do you have any similar stories about your relatives in "Great War"?

Regards,
Kocjo

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Galicia
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Post by Galicia » 20 Jul 2003 21:17

Umm. Not as gruesome.

My great uncle was a Rittermeister, or something like that. It's the Austrian Cavalry equivilant of a Army Captain. He had died in 1915 while serving in the 17th Hussars, (I think, It's the Galician Hussars Regiment), and subsequently, his sword was lost.

On a trip to Vienna when I had been 14, I forced my mother to go into a small Militaria Shop on the Dorothystrasse. I lingered for about an hour until I started to look through a large pile of swords in a rack. On one side of the Sword had been "J v. P" and on the other side, my mother's family's coat of arms, identical to my Grandfather's sword.

It was found! Heavily rusted though, it really is a piece of junk.

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hunor
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Post by hunor » 21 Jul 2003 10:18

My great grandfather served at the Royal Hungarian Airforce in WWII. (I got his group photograph from 1942.) and he was sent to Russia and he survived the disaster on river Don. Unfortunately I don't know anymore about this story because he never wanted to talk about this topic. I asked him a lot of times but he was unable to speak about that. The only sentece I heard was: "Sometimes we were marching in blood and corpses".

TM2000
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Veteran stories...

Post by TM2000 » 27 Jul 2003 19:02

>>>>>Unfortunately I don't know anymore about this story because he never wanted to talk about this topic. I asked him a lot of times but he was unable to speak about that. The only sentece I heard was: "Sometimes we were marching in blood and corpses".>>>>>>>>

This is typical for the veterans that have experienced the real horrible things. It is known from the latest ex-Yu wars. The people that were witnessing the horrible events or were engaged in bloody combat do not want to speak about it. They only speak ocasionally in the circe where they are sure the others will understand them or with the people that were participating the events too. The loudest are usually those, who were acctually not witnessing the horrible things.

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hunor
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Re: Veteran stories...

Post by hunor » 28 Jul 2003 21:40

TM2000 wrote:>>>>>Unfortunately I don't know anymore about this story because he never wanted to talk about this topic. I asked him a lot of times but he was unable to speak about that. The only sentece I heard was: "Sometimes we were marching in blood and corpses".>>>>>>>>

This is typical for the veterans that have experienced the real horrible things. It is known from the latest ex-Yu wars. The people that were witnessing the horrible events or were engaged in bloody combat do not want to speak about it. They only speak ocasionally in the circe where they are sure the others will understand them or with the people that were participating the events too. The loudest are usually those, who were acctually not witnessing the horrible things.


Yes. But I'm sad that I couldn't hear the stories. I think it would be very important to know his experiences of war. But now unfortunately the stories are buried with him.

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Whisper
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Re: Veteran stories...

Post by Whisper » 28 Jul 2003 21:46

hunor wrote:
TM2000 wrote:>>>>>Unfortunately I don't know anymore about this story because he never wanted to talk about this topic. I asked him a lot of times but he was unable to speak about that. The only sentece I heard was: "Sometimes we were marching in blood and corpses".>>>>>>>>

This is typical for the veterans that have experienced the real horrible things. It is known from the latest ex-Yu wars. The people that were witnessing the horrible events or were engaged in bloody combat do not want to speak about it. They only speak ocasionally in the circe where they are sure the others will understand them or with the people that were participating the events too. The loudest are usually those, who were acctually not witnessing the horrible things.


Yes. But I'm sad that I couldn't hear the stories. I think it would be very important to know his experiences of war. But now unfortunately the stories are buried with him.


Are you sure that you really want to know what he went through, when he decided to, maybe protect you from what happened back then.
He maybe buried it inside himself to get along with it.
He was there, thats no movie we are talking about here.

Bw
Dennis

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tyskaorden
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Post by tyskaorden » 29 Jul 2003 15:49

Galicia wrote:Umm. Not as gruesome.

My great uncle was a Rittermeister, or something like that. It's the Austrian Cavalry equivilant of a Army Captain. He had died in 1915 while serving in the 17th Hussars, (I think, It's the Galician Hussars Regiment), and subsequently, his sword was lost.


The Hussars of the Austo-Hungarian Army, was recruited in the Kingdom of Hungary and not in Galicia (Galizien) which belonged to the Austrian part of the Empire. The Army had only 16 Hussar Regiments so no 17th Hussars existed. Maybe your relative served in the Galizisch-Bukowina'sches Dragoner Regiment Erzherzog Albrecht Nr 9 garrisioned in Kamioka-Strumilowa, Brody and Kolomea. This was the only Dragoon Regiment recruited in Galizien. He could also had served in one of the 11 Uhlan Regiments, the majority of which was recruited in Galizien.

Best regards,
Marcus Kalsson a.k.a. Tyskaorden[/quote]

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Galicia
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Post by Galicia » 30 Jul 2003 02:55

Man.

You're probably right. I never met the man so that's the extent of my story really. I should try to find out though, it's not on his sword or his brother's however so it's a bit difficult since I don't speak German and I can't find the lists. Do you know where I could pick some up?

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Balrog
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Post by Balrog » 30 Jul 2003 03:59

hhmmm. this man was not a relative of mine, but he had an interesting background. i graduated from a military university called The Citadel, in south carolina(USA). one of my german language professors was hungarian. his name was josef gundel, his godfather was archduke josef, brother of the last hapsburg emperor. he graduated from a hungarian military academy in 1944, and was commisioned a lt. in the royal hungarian panzer corps. he was sent to fight on the russian front. the first day he arrived in his unit, the company commander was mising in action, presumed killed or somehow captured. he used to spend most friday classes talking about his war experiences, just little stories, small amounts of information at a time. he talked about how terrible the russian army behaved toward civillain populations(rapes, murders) and how desperate the hungarian/german army was to hold off the russian advance. he fought his way(retreating) and ended up surrendering in germany, i'm not sure which city. he said the axis troops wanted to surrender to the americans, not the russians, british, etc. he was captured by the british, sent to a POW camp in germany, and beaten badly and repeatedly by british military intelligence officers.(yes, he said the british did that) the jailer of the hungarian officers was a german(ex nazi sgt.) soldier who spoke perect hungarian, he was recriuted as a guard by the british and this german guy even carried a rifle!! he was told in 1946 that he was free to go ,but refused to leave the prison. the british had so badly mistreated him and the other hungarians that he was afriad the british would shoot him and claim he was "trying to escape". he told the camp commandant that he would walk out of prison only if a member of the clergy walked out with him, as a percaution. the british commander of the camp personally walked him out of the camp compound for a distance until he reached a place josef gundel felt relaxed enough. then the ommandant said good bye and walked back to the base. josef gundel had no more country to return too. the communist government had already started taking his family property, including the faily resturant"gundel's", a resturant which was supposed to be quite grand. he grandfather had been a famous hungarian chef. the gundel family had lost everything now. josef had no money, no family or friends that could help him. he lived in the ruins of germany. some germans helped him find work, he saved money, married a german girl, and finally emigrated to america in the late 1940's or early 1950's(i don't remember the whole story now). he retired from the citadel in 1991, teaching german for since the 1960's. he died in 1992, just before i graduated. he was a really good guy. an absolute gentleman who had "learned not to take himself to seriously". i even attended the funeral with other cadets. he told me his old miltary academy had been turned into a hospital by the communists, and that the family resturant was supposed to be returned to his family as private property again.( supposedly to have been returned in 1992, the resturant is in budapest)

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Glenn2438
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Post by Glenn2438 » 30 Jul 2003 07:41

Galicia,

if you give me the full name of your great uncle I will look him up. If he was a Rittmeister he will be listed in the Austro-Hungarian army lists.

Regards
Glenn

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hunor
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Re: Veteran stories...

Post by hunor » 01 Aug 2003 12:45

Whisper wrote:Are you sure that you really want to know what he went through, when he decided to, maybe protect you from what happened back then.
He maybe buried it inside himself to get along with it.
He was there, thats no movie we are talking about here.

Bw
Dennis


Yes i'm sure. I1m veryinterested in the event he lived so I'm sad that I couldn't hear his stories. i think to hear a story of WWII from great grandfather is more useful than hear the facts in school during the history class. isn't it?

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