Death of Jurij (Georg) Vega

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Locke
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Death of Jurij (Georg) Vega

Post by Locke » 05 Apr 2004 21:32

From Austria hungary quiz thread:
Glenn2438 wrote:Orok and Polona,

further to the death of Oberst-Lieutenant Georg Freiherr von Vega. It is reported in the history of the MMThO that following his death in the Danube later enquiries conjected that he had been murdered by a miller and thrown into the river!

Regards
Glenn


I got some new info on death of Freiherr von Vega. The strory that a miller killed Vega when he was buying a horse is not true, although some newspapers published this story as explanation for Vega's death. Historians who researched this matter didn't find any info on any trial for Vega's death. An article in Viennese newspaper "Vaterländischen Blätter" denied that Vega was killed ba a miller and criticizes a German newspaper which wrote this story.
The fact is that Vega died in suspicious circumstances, but there is still a question how he died.
(I got this from Slovenian newspaper Delo)

Regards,
Polona

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Orok
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Post by Orok » 05 Apr 2004 22:07

Polona,

Thanks for the infomation. Is there a good biography of the baron out there?

Best Regards!

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K.Kocjancic
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Post by K.Kocjancic » 05 Apr 2004 22:37

Orok wrote:Polona,

Thanks for the infomation. Is there a good biography of the baron out there?

Best Regards!


In Slovene army magazine "Slovenska vojska" / "Slovenian Army" they started with serie of articles on Vega.

Regards,
Klemen

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Post by Orok » 06 Apr 2004 00:30

Klemen,

Thanks for the info!

Best Regards!

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Post by K.Kocjancic » 06 Apr 2004 05:48

Orok wrote:Klemen,

Thanks for the info!

Best Regards!


If you want I can translate first part of the serie.

Regards,
Klemen

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Orok
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Post by Orok » 06 Apr 2004 15:44

Hi Klemen,

If you could kindly do that and post it here for us, we would be eternally grateful! :lol:

Thanks a lot!

Best Regards!

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250. Anniversary of Baron Jurij Vega (1. part)

Post by K.Kocjancic » 06 Apr 2004 16:25

Baron Jurij Vega (23. March 1754 - 17. September 1802), world know Slovenian mathematician, scientist and artilery Officer. In Slovenia, in different times, there were several excellent Artilery officers. Many of them are also know outside of our borders; amongst them was on of most important baron Jurij Bartolomej Vega (1), originally Veha (2).

From poor shepherd to engineer profession
Jurij Vega was probably born on 23. March 1754, definetly baptized on 24.3.1754 in village of Zagorica pri Dolskem, not far from Ljubljana (3).
So this year on March we will be celebrating 250. anniversary of birth one of the finest sons of Slovene nation, baron Jurj Vega. He was living and working in Austria, so we can't be surprised, that he signed his work in German language as Georg Freiherr von Vega. In this signature we can find answer, why someone are missled of his origin. (4)
Jurij Vega had already in primary school loved books and was extremely inteligent with spirit to study. This was soon noticed by his teachers and parents. Because of his family social status, they couldn't think to even send him to study, but Vega himself known that and had decided to make his live without any help. So at age 12 he already left home. He kept his memory on home until his death.
Jung Vega started his poor student life in 1767 in middle Jesuit school in Ljubljana. Inspiet being poor he was amongst best students and unmatched school champion in math (5).
After Jesuit order was disbanded Vega had attend state's School [don't know and couldn't find translation for word Licej; it was school in rang between High school and College - maybe Junior College?) from 1773 to 1775, where he was specialized into science and technik. His math professor was Josef Liberatus Maffei de Glattfort (7), physics professor Gregor Schoettl (8), art, geometry, mechanics and hydroulic [sp] Gabrijel Gruber (9). As his student he was probably involved into measuring of Barje [swamp south of Ljubljana] and tracing of channel [Gruber's channel was built for dewatering of Barje swamp). It's not known, if Gruber inspired Vega for profession of ferry engineering (10). With support of his professor of math Maffei he finished his study in 1775 with excelent mark (11) and with 21. years became Navigational engineer.

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Post by Orok » 06 Apr 2004 16:42

Klemen,

Great article, thank you very much for taking time to translate and share it with us! Pray continue! :lol:

As to the word Licej, there is an English word lyceum which is frequently used to translate this continental educational institute. I guess you can use this word and most English speakers would have understood it! :lol:

Best Regards!

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Post by K.Kocjancic » 06 Apr 2004 17:24

Dissatisfied with his profession
We know little about this period of his life, but we do know that he was working in Inner Austria (12), probably also in Slovenian in near-by, but not in Ljubljana. In that job he has no chance for promotion, so in 1780 he made important step in his life. (13) In those 5 years he improved his knowledge of physics and math and begune to use his knowledge in his life. Theory was best connected with military profession. Maybe this change was a litle surpising, because it was difficult to connect life od scientist and soldier. This was even more impossible in time, when Austrian army was always involved in wars and fights. If we study that period time, army and life in army, we would realized that his decision was based on life facts. Most of state's money was spent for wars, army,... In that time role of artilery was becoming more important, but it still had a status of militarized craft and not status of integrated militar profession. Development was in hand of craftsman and their knowledge and so it was impossible for physical-mathematical knowledge to be used for fast and reliable progress.

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Post by K.Kocjancic » 08 Apr 2004 18:53

From regular Artileryman to Math-Professor in Art.School
On base of his realistic life-view had Vecha, now with new surname Vega, volunteerly joined Artilery units as common Artileryman in 2. Field Art.Rgt. in 1780 (14). This step was very important for his future life, because he became great warrior, high military teacher, great artilery inventor and respected and world-known scientist.

Already after one-year's service he was promoted to Ltn. and became Math-Prof. in Regimental Art.School. In 1782 his first work "Mathematic lectures"/"Vorlesungen über die Mathematik" was published (15), which was very well accepted by other scientists. In his work he was writing about importance of basic and universal education on field of Math and physics. This he regarded as base for artilery development and good usage of cannons.

Incouraged by success of his first work he had already next year published his Logarithmic [sp] and Trygenometry [sp] tables. Next year he publish his third work, second volume of "Mathematic lectures".

Austrian army had realized importance on education in Art.branch, which was more imporatant in Siege Art., then in Field Art. So they decided to split Art. in two branches - Field and Siege Art. in 1786. Vega was placed in commison for preparation of education plan of Artilery units and appointed as first Math-Prof. in Corps.

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Post by Orok » 08 Apr 2004 18:59

Thanks Klemen,

Looking forward to more.

Best Regards!

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Post by K.Kocjancic » 09 Apr 2004 18:56

From Captain to Ltn.Colonel on Turkish, Prussich and French battle-field

In 1787 he was promoted to rank of Captain. Same year he had published "Practical instructions for throwing bombs"/"Praktische Anweisung zum Bombenwerfen", which puts Vega in beginners of scientifical based balistic. Manual was in use for a long time. When in 1788 war broke lose between Austria and Turkey (1788-1791) (16), was old Marschal Laudon given an order in 1789 to siege and occupay Beograd [Belgrade], which was with it's fort Kalemegdan very strong and hard-to-conquer fortification. Vega volunteered and joined his army in their siege. He went on battle-field in final time, when the last defence of Turks had to be break. With mission to check capability of Austrian artilery, he had assumed command of group of batteries of heavy mortars, 60- and 100-pounds mortars (17). With observation of bombardment and calculations, he figured out, that ellevacion angles and mortar's filling are wrong and don't match weight of missiles. He was walking from gun to gun and with help of branches he had set right ellevacion angles. With this he helped Austrian artilery to better hits of enemy positions on 7. and 8.10., so much, that fort had surrendered on 8.10. During this siege he showed his bravery for the first time. He went to field, where turkish bombs were falling. After 2 hours they sent soldiers to find him; they found him during calculations of turkish art. positions. Inspite of his importance with siege, all the glory went to senior officers.
After occupation of Belgrade, Prussia started to concentrate it's troops on border with Austria. Austria got involved in battles with Prussich king Friderik Viljem II. Companies, stationed in Moravian and Schlesia, joined also Vega, artilery expert. 2 years, he spent there, he used for study and math work. In Moravia he stayed until 1792, when he was promoted to Major. That year he had returned to Wien with planes for publishing logarytms tables.

More to come...

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Post by K.Kocjancic » 10 Apr 2004 10:45

Foot-notes:
1.) In Bapthism's book of Moravica we can find his name written in formal Latin: Georgius Bartholomaei Vecha.

2.) Original family name was Veha, but this word has a "bad-ring" to it, because it also means "unreliable man", which Jurij Vega wasn't. So he changed it.

3.) In that time was tradition to baptise new-borns already second day after birth, because of high mortality. So we can say that he was born on 23.3.1754 in small house Zagorica 10. Later they built a new house, but that burned during WWII. Now there is a memorial stone, which indicates probable location of his house.

4.) In some German military encyclopaedia from 19th Century is written, that baron Jurij Vega was of Spanish decent [ 8O 8O :roll: ], but you can also find statements, that he was from Germany or Swiss.

5.) Amongst his fellow school-mates, which were A students, was also first Slovene play-writer and scientifical historian Anton Tomaž Linhart.

6.) This institution started with some sort of College study in Slovenia.

7.) He also included logarithems in his work.

8.) He was expert on many field; his work was based on Newton and Bošković; which was also base for Vega.

9.) Gruber was one of most educated and creatful personalities, who were working in second helf of 18. Century in Ljubljana. He was excelent hydrotechican, who made plan for de-watering channel by Ljubljanica and leading work on it from 1772 to 1777.

10.) After completion of Gruber's channel, Vega decided to quit from this line-of-work.

11.) After 2 year's study he had to past final exam, which was made from 26 pages of math, 20 pages of physical and 6 pages of questions from logic and methaphysics.

12.) Inner Austria was divided to Krain, Steiermark and Görz.

13.) Vega was given as Navigational engineer 600 crown (Kronne) of pay, which wasn't leading excuse for switching jobs.

14.) At that time Vega mived to Wien.

15.) Study-book was published in 4 volumes:
- first in 1782; Math for High School, which was reprinted 7 times, last time in 1850; also was translated to Danish
- second in 1784; Geometry with Infinitesty [sp????] math and basic of land-surveying and mapping; 8th reprints and translation to Norwegian
- third in 1788; Mechanic of solid bodies with Parabola theory and chart for Mortar's projectile, systemathical description of machines of that time with unique theory of inside mehanism; five reprints
- fourth in 1800; mechanic of liquids and gases; 2 reprints

16.) In that time everyone was focused on France, Austria was in war with Turkey and had recapture Beograd (lost in 1521). This was last Austro-Turkish war.

17.) These were mortars, who used 60 or 100 pounds boms, which is 30 or 50 kg.

18.) He guided guns so well, that they were hiting fort-walls and also git main powder-storage. After fort's capitulation, Laudon let 6000 people to leave fort.


P.S. Yesterday I got new magazine, with second, final part of article. Which I'll translate in following days. :wink:

Regards,
Klemen

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Post by Orok » 10 Apr 2004 14:51

Hi Klemen,

Thanks for the efforts!

Interesting people would think the Baron's of Spanish heritage! :lol: Perhaps Vega is also a common Spanish surname. I have a colleague here who is a Vega, and one of my firends in college is a De Vega! Both are Hispanic.

Looking forward to the next segment.

BTW does the magazine article have any illustration/pictures? Any chance of posting them here?

Best Regards!

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Post by K.Kocjancic » 10 Apr 2004 15:09

Orok wrote:BTW does the magazine article have any illustration/pictures? Any chance of posting them here?


For first part of article go to:
http://www.mors.si/mors/pdf/revija_sv/sv04_06.pdf - page 10->

For second part of article go to:
http://www.mors.si/mors/pdf/revija_sv/sv04_07.pdf - page 28->

Regards,
Klemen

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