Was Austria-Hungary doomed to fail?

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MihaiC
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Post by MihaiC » 18 Jul 2003 12:05

much famous persons of this countries (croats, slovacs, slovens and cehs)

I know you meant nations, not countries. Those persons were representative for their nations? There were in any way elected?
And in 1917 AH still has an army and a police, so those persons could be thrown in prison if they were anti AH.

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SerbTiger
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Post by SerbTiger » 31 Jul 2003 09:13

The Corfu Declaration was merely the starting point of the domino effect which would result in the swift creation of a united Slavic state. This Declaration was followed by President Wilson's Fourteen Points on January 8, 1918. President Wilson's speech, points ten and eleven in particular, confirmed Serbia's high international prestige and its good standing among the Allies. Furthermore, Serbia was offered most of Slavonia and almost half of Dalmatia. Croatia and Slovenia on the other hand, found themselves in a no-win situation. They were disliked by the Allies for their alliance with the Central powers and as a result Italy had been promised vast amounts of Croatian and Slovenian land. Therefore, their only alternative was to become strong advocates of the new kingdom. Although they each wanted their own independent nation, at least this union would allow them to salvage some of their land that would otherwise be distributed to the Italians. At the same time, the Croatians and Slovenians could prosper from their alliance with the prestigious and highly regarded Serbs.

Source: NothPark University http://campus.northpark.edu/history/Web ... ngdom.html
Emphasis is my own.

The creation of the new state in the Balkans was reflected in international peace treaties in which this new state’s name had to appear among the names of Allied forces - victorious powers of World War I. This place had been intended for Serbia, but by the act of unification Serbia ceased to exist as an international legal entity. Hence, the name of the new state - the State of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes was entered in the peace treaties, and in the Pact of the League of Nations as a founding country.

As I said Croatia had a choice beetween joining Serbia or ceasing to exist, they joined Serbia who accapted them into the kingdom.

Regards,
Serb Tiger

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Windward
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Post by Windward » 01 Aug 2003 07:18

TransLeithania might be survived as an integrated Hungarian country with a peace treaty of mercy. At least it could keep Siebenburgen and Slovakia. But I do not think CisLeithania could be remained after the War.

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Orok
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Post by Orok » 15 Sep 2003 23:29

Gwynn Compton wrote:Franz Ferdinand believed in granting greater autonomy to the provinces from my knowledge. Does anyone else know what the Crown Prince planned to do?

Gwynn


Ferdinand was very pro-Croat and wanted to give the Croats more autonomy, perhaps eventually their own state within the monarchy. This could only be achieved at the expenses of the Hungarians, as Croat was then part of Hungary, not Austria! This would also dash the dreams of the Serbs who wanted a united kingdom of all the southern Slav ethnicities under the Serbian rule. So basically Ferdinand was facing fierce resistance from both inside and outside the dual monarchy, and his pro-Croat tendency was the direct reason why the Serbs wanted him eliminated before the ailing Franz Josef was dead!

So even if the assacination attempt somehow failed and he ascended the Austro-Hungarian throne, if he had a free hand to give the Croats what they wanted, the Hungarians would bolt and civil war would ensue. The result: the collapse of the dual monarchy.

But this course might be better for the Hungarians, for although they would lose Croatia, they most likely would still have most of Slovakia and Transylvania! :D

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